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    Hiya,
    I know people often ask how to get a first in the general uni section but I would like to know if any of the people here have any advice for foreign languages specifically - websites/techniques/good books etc...thank you
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    Emmm, study ****ing hard, learn vocab lists all the time, talk to natives regularly...
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    Lol, thanks. It's just when people say 'study', it's a bit vague. There are different methods of learning languages.
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    I'd like to know too
    I mean, if you're fluent in the language and your grammar is perfect, and your vocab is extensive, how wrong can you go?!?!
    =/
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    I'd assume it's just getting good enough marks/grades to warrent getting a first.

    Just practice on all the disciplines, speaking, listening, reading, writing, to make sure there are no gaps and I'm sure you'll be fine
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    (Original post by rakata)
    I'd like to know too
    I mean, if you're fluent in the language and your grammar is perfect, and your vocab is extensive, how wrong can you go?!?!
    =/
    I thought that, my Spanish is quite good. I have a conversation, I love grammar and I could write pretty much anything I wanted but missed out on an A at A-level because I find exam techniques/timing/writing essays a bit difficult.
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    If you're asking about specific study techniques that's pretty broad - it has to be a method that suits you. I find immersing myself in the language completely and trying to minimise english -> french translation, but rather working from what french I know works the best. My mums first language is french however, so I do have a large advantage in terms of speaking and assistance. Post up some vocab lists around the place, even labeling ordinary, menial household objects can be helpful.

    What language are you studying?
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    I'm doing Spanish and German ab initio. I'm a bit worried about the intensity of ab initio courses as well. I don't even remember starting Spanish, it was so long ago! My family don't speak any other languages whatsoever and I don't think they'd like me sticking notes on everything in the house lol! Thanks for your reply x
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    (Original post by Hylean)
    Emmm, study ****ing hard, learn vocab lists all the time, talk to natives regularly...
    :ditto:
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    (Original post by xJessx)
    I thought that, my Spanish is quite good. I have a conversation, I love grammar and I could write pretty much anything I wanted but missed out on an A at A-level because I find exam techniques/timing/writing essays a bit difficult.

    In which case, these are your weak spots and is something you should concentrate on. You'll be writing lots more essays at university- both in English and in Spanish- and whenever you get set an assignment put a lot of effort into structure and the arguments. When tutors give you feedback be sure to take it on board and follow their instructions on how to improve this.
    I know how you feel by the way- my spoken French is fluent but I'd never written formal essays as such. So I got essays titles and jst practiced as hard as I could, planning the structure, arguments and general content very carefully. Now my essay writing is up to scratch. Also, remember to keep the linguistic side of things flowing, read formal articles from newspapers/journals in Spanish and see how argumentative text is structured. This helped me a lot too! Good luck
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    (Original post by rakata)
    I'd like to know too
    I mean, if you're fluent in the language and your grammar is perfect, and your vocab is extensive, how wrong can you go?!?!
    =/
    Well, very wrong actually. Usually only a small part of the degree is actually language based - this year I'll be doing modules on the student movement of 1968, literature from 1990 onwards, to name only two. As you can see, these obviously require far more than just language skills.

    Making the time to study is going to be a big factor - doing all the extra reading they set - basically just not shirking off. I've just realised what a tough year this is going to be.
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    (Original post by Fillette)
    In which case, these are your weak spots and is something you should concentrate on. You'll be writing lots more essays at university- both in English and in Spanish- and whenever you get set an assignment put a lot of effort into structure and the arguments. When tutors give you feedback be sure to take it on board and follow their instructions on how to improve this.
    I know how you feel by the way- my spoken French is fluent but I'd never written formal essays as such. So I got essays titles and jst practiced as hard as I could, planning the structure, arguments and general content very carefully. Now my essay writing is up to scratch. Also, remember to keep the linguistic side of things flowing, read formal articles from newspapers/journals in Spanish and see how argumentative text is structured. This helped me a lot too! Good luck
    Thanks
 
 
 
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