Anonymous #1
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i am an american citizen that was born in the uk. I want to go and study law. I would like to go to an ivy league college. Is there any advice you would give and what tests and qualifications i could translate.
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PetitePanda
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#2
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You sure you want to study law in America? Why so?
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by PetitePanda)
You sure you want to study law in America? Why so?
Yes, I have family and have spent a lot of time there. I feel connected to the country.
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PetitePanda
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Yes, I have family and have spent a lot of time there. I feel connected to the country.
Fair enough then. What year are you in?
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Anonymous #1
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(Original post by PetitePanda)
Fair enough then. What year are you in?
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PetitePanda
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(Original post by Anonymous)
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That's good you are planning before then. I recommend finding about SATs and (what type of) ACTs and what you need to do for the application (e.g. common essay). You could find some useful threads if you look at previous threads on here and there is some websites they mentioned that will be more useful than here since this is mostly UK website so applying to America will be better to ask on more American help websites. I also recommend you look at sutton trust us programme because that's really helpful. What are you planning to do after GCSEs?
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Bill V2
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(Original post by PetitePanda)
That's good you are planning before then. I recommend finding about SATs and (what type of) ACTs and what you need to do for the application (e.g. common essay). You could find some useful threads if you look at previous threads on here and there is some websites they mentioned that will be more useful than here since this is mostly UK website so applying to America will be better to ask on more American help websites. I also recommend you look at sutton trust us programme because that's really helpful. What are you planning to do after GCSEs?
On the website for the sutton trust us programme, it says that applicants must not hold US citizenship
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PetitePanda
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(Original post by Bill V2)
On the website for the sutton trust us programme, it says that applicants must not hold US citizenship
Does OP have American citizenship or British citizenship or both??? (Also thank you for stating that btw
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Bill V2
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(Original post by PetitePanda)
Does OP have American citizenship or British citizenship or both??? (Also thank you for stating that btw
In the OP they said they said they were an American citizen, but idk if they hold both or what
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Anonymous #2
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HI! so i'm american, and about to start at an ivy next year. First off, if you want to study law right off the bat (meaning as an undergrad) you can't do that in the US, so you will have to study in the UK or elsewhere. In the US, you have to do four years of undergraduate degree, and then you can go to law school (which is three years). If you are from the UK, and that is your interest it might be best to keep that in mind. However, if you'd like to study undergrad in the US (in something maybe like PoliSci, English Lit etc. all subjects that easily lead into law school due to the heavy reading focus) you will have to take the SATs for a lot of schools (but not all), but certainly for the ivys. For your SATs, if you are in grade 10, now could be a great time to start studying, so you can take them in year 11 or the summer before year 12. Your SAT score will have to be quite high, although colleges do have a "hollistic" approach, meaning you aren't defined by only your scores. For an ivy you will want to aim for anywhere from 1400 or higher (you could also take the SAT but i'm not super educated on it because i didn't take it haha). If you can take some SAT IIs (this depends on which ivy you apply to because some STRONGLY RECOMMEND IT which basically means its a requirement unless theres an extenuating circumstance). You are also going to want to think about your essay. It's a much less direct/academic approach than in the UK (I also applied to UK schools), its a personal essay where they want to learn about you personally, if you have an advisor that knows about US colleges at your school I would highly advise speaking to them.

Also, in terms of your grades, i don't know if the UK has GPA, but whatever the equivalent is needs to be as good as it can be think oxbridge/lse/ucl difficulty. Your predicted scores don't really matter, you just need to pass.
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Anonymous #2
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(Original post by Anonymous)
HI! so i'm american, and about to start at an ivy next year. First off, if you want to study law right off the bat (meaning as an undergrad) you can't do that in the US, so you will have to study in the UK or elsewhere. In the US, you have to do four years of undergraduate degree, and then you can go to law school (which is three years). If you are from the UK, and that is your interest it might be best to keep that in mind. However, if you'd like to study undergrad in the US (in something maybe like PoliSci, English Lit etc. all subjects that easily lead into law school due to the heavy reading focus) you will have to take the SATs for a lot of schools (but not all), but certainly for the ivys. For your SATs, if you are in grade 10, now could be a great time to start studying, so you can take them in year 11 or the summer before year 12. Your SAT score will have to be quite high, although colleges do have a "hollistic" approach, meaning you aren't defined by only your scores. For an ivy you will want to aim for anywhere from 1400 or higher (you could also take the SAT but i'm not super educated on it because i didn't take it haha). If you can take some SAT IIs (this depends on which ivy you apply to because some STRONGLY RECOMMEND IT which basically means its a requirement unless theres an extenuating circumstance). You are also going to want to think about your essay. It's a much less direct/academic approach than in the UK (I also applied to UK schools), its a personal essay where they want to learn about you personally, if you have an advisor that knows about US colleges at your school I would highly advise speaking to them.

Also, in terms of your grades, i don't know if the UK has GPA, but whatever the equivalent is needs to be as good as it can be think oxbridge/lse/ucl difficulty. Your predicted scores don't really matter, you just need to pass.
*also take the ACT
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Anonymous #2
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(Original post by Anonymous)
HI! so i'm american, and about to start at an ivy next year. First off, if you want to study law right off the bat (meaning as an undergrad) you can't do that in the US, so you will have to study in the UK or elsewhere. In the US, you have to do four years of undergraduate degree, and then you can go to law school (which is three years). If you are from the UK, and that is your interest it might be best to keep that in mind. However, if you'd like to study undergrad in the US (in something maybe like PoliSci, English Lit etc. all subjects that easily lead into law school due to the heavy reading focus) you will have to take the SATs for a lot of schools (but not all), but certainly for the ivys. For your SATs, if you are in grade 10, now could be a great time to start studying, so you can take them in year 11 or the summer before year 12. Your SAT score will have to be quite high, although colleges do have a "hollistic" approach, meaning you aren't defined by only your scores. For an ivy you will want to aim for anywhere from 1400 or higher (you could also take the SAT but i'm not super educated on it because i didn't take it haha). If you can take some SAT IIs (this depends on which ivy you apply to because some STRONGLY RECOMMEND IT which basically means its a requirement unless theres an extenuating circumstance). You are also going to want to think about your essay. It's a much less direct/academic approach than in the UK (I also applied to UK schools), its a personal essay where they want to learn about you personally, if you have an advisor that knows about US colleges at your school I would highly advise speaking to them.

Also, in terms of your grades, i don't know if the UK has GPA, but whatever the equivalent is needs to be as good as it can be think oxbridge/lse/ucl difficulty. Your predicted scores don't really matter, you just need to pass.
also just remembered there are no transcripts in the UK, so do ensure your predicted score is high enough (even if, again, you don't have to actually reach it to attend).
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