lilnna3
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 3 months ago
#1
Hello, I am thinking of enrolling on one/both of the maths modules at open university essential maths 1 and 2 MST124 and MST125. I’m trying to decide which one would be best for me, I got an A* at A level maths 6 years ago and the main reason for me doing it would be to recap on everything and learn some new things. I’m thinking of applying to an online conversion MSc in computer science or AI and I will need to be confident in maths for this and will need to be able to prove my maths skills which is why I’m thinking of a module rather than just self learning. It would be good to have some structure and who knows maybe I can build up modules into another degree. I’m also interested in learning more maths since I really liked it at A level. It looks like MST124 starts at kind of AS level and progresses to further maths, and MST125 takes it further. I’ve heard of most of the things on the MST124 specification and got most of the questions right in the readiness quiz (with some researching!). The MST125 quiz I recognise stuff and can do some of the questions but I can’t do all of it without researching. Lots of stuff on the specification is new to me too. If anyone’s done either of these modules it would be great to get some advice about what sort of level they are. I don’t want it to be too ‘easy’ but also the point of doing it is to recap and practice. Similarly I don’t want to be completely lost. Also if anyone knows about the level of maths needed for conversion MSc in CS or AI. Thanks 😬
0
reply
artful_lounger
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 3 months ago
#2
If you did well in A-level Maths or equivalent relatively recently then you'll find MST124 quite straightforward, although some of the material will be new. I'd probably suggest you take both simultaneously. There is a specific "route" through the modules if you are taking both at the same time, in terms of the order in which you learn the material, and the deadlines for the assignments are structured in such a way that you can follow the syllabus in a linear fashion (you sort of move back and forth between each module depending on the topic(s) as you progress).

If you are very unsure of your background then you could start with MST124 then start up MST125 in the February session, which would give you longer to consolidate the earlier material in MST124 (and also means the exams would be taken in separate exam periods). If you had an A* in A-level Maths though I'm pretty sure you could easily manage both at the same time. The exams for those modules are a lot easier than the A-level exams generally, as you get to take the handbook in with "special annotations" (basically, you can write any notes you want that will fit on the pages of the handbook), and the exams themselves are multiple choice which makes some questions more straightforward (although it does mean you have to be careful with your algebra while more involved calculations as there are no method marks).

As far as what will be needed for the conversion, I couldn't really say, it would probably vary depending on the course. I'd suggest contacting the course provider and asking about what prior knowledge would be expected and/or useful. To my knowledge AI involves a fair bit of stats, and otherwise is a lot of control theory/systems engineering as I understand, which is elements of calculus and differential equations (how far into it they go can vary a lot though; a fully rigorous mathematical treatment could entail proper analysis, while they could also take a more practical approach which is a bit more handwavy).
0
reply
lilnna3
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 3 months ago
#3
Wow thank you for your reply that’s really helpful! I think I will go with them both then, but in October for MST124 and then February for MST125 (money reasons mainly and I work full time but from home at the moment luckily). That’s good to know about the exams as well, so do you have to go physically in somewhere to do the exam? Thanks for the advice about AI, the course I’m looking at says algebra and calculus mainly but I’ll look at stats too, I’ve just seen a probability OU module that looks good. I’m aiming for a course that has a good maths aspect to it.
0
reply
starofthesun
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 month ago
#4
(Original post by lilnna3)
Hello, I am thinking of enrolling on one/both of the maths modules at open university essential maths 1 and 2 MST124 and MST125. I’m trying to decide which one would be best for me, I got an A* at A level maths 6 years ago and the main reason for me doing it would be to recap on everything and learn some new things. I’m thinking of applying to an online conversion MSc in computer science or AI and I will need to be confident in maths for this and will need to be able to prove my maths skills which is why I’m thinking of a module rather than just self learning. It would be good to have some structure and who knows maybe I can build up modules into another degree. I’m also interested in learning more maths since I really liked it at A level. It looks like MST124 starts at kind of AS level and progresses to further maths, and MST125 takes it further. I’ve heard of most of the things on the MST124 specification and got most of the questions right in the readiness quiz (with some researching!). The MST125 quiz I recognise stuff and can do some of the questions but I can’t do all of it without researching. Lots of stuff on the specification is new to me too. If anyone’s done either of these modules it would be great to get some advice about what sort of level they are. I don’t want it to be too ‘easy’ but also the point of doing it is to recap and practice. Similarly I don’t want to be completely lost. Also if anyone knows about the level of maths needed for conversion MSc in CS or AI. Thanks 😬
Regarding the conversion course. In general a good AI course , with machine learning etc.., should contain a lot of mathematics. This will require knowledge in Calculus 1, differential calculus Algebra 1, Linear Algebra, Probability and statistics including probability distribution and bayesian statistics. In a Ms Cs conversion, they will teach you some basic computaitonal maths.

If you want my advice, I know there are a lot of Msc conversion courses out there. But a lot of them are a waste of time or money. Compare the syllabus of UCL, ICL, Queen Mary, Warwick with others and you will see the difference. I dont know your background. But if you have not studied a numerate degree such as physics, engineering etc, I would advise you against a conversion course. You will be at a disadvantage when compared to people who have a Bsc in the subject and it might be harder to get a job in the long run. It is just 2 extra years and you will learn much more than what people do in conversion courses. a Bsc in comp sci with a lot of maths involved is a good idea
Last edited by starofthesun; 1 month ago
0
reply
maven2k
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#5
Report 4 weeks ago
#5
(Original post by artful_lounger)
If you did well in A-level Maths or equivalent relatively recently then you'll find MST124 quite straightforward, although some of the material will be new. I'd probably suggest you take both simultaneously. There is a specific "route" through the modules if you are taking both at the same time, in terms of the order in which you learn the material, and the deadlines for the assignments are structured in such a way that you can follow the syllabus in a linear fashion (you sort of move back and forth between each module depending on the topic(s) as you progress).

If you are very unsure of your background then you could start with MST124 then start up MST125 in the February session, which would give you longer to consolidate the earlier material in MST124 (and also means the exams would be taken in separate exam periods). If you had an A* in A-level Maths though I'm pretty sure you could easily manage both at the same time. The exams for those modules are a lot easier than the A-level exams generally, as you get to take the handbook in with "special annotations" (basically, you can write any notes you want that will fit on the pages of the handbook), and the exams themselves are multiple choice which makes some questions more straightforward (although it does mean you have to be careful with your algebra while more involved calculations as there are no method marks).

As far as what will be needed for the conversion, I couldn't really say, it would probably vary depending on the course. I'd suggest contacting the course provider and asking about what prior knowledge would be expected and/or useful. To my knowledge AI involves a fair bit of stats, and otherwise is a lot of control theory/systems engineering as I understand, which is elements of calculus and differential equations (how far into it they go can vary a lot though; a fully rigorous mathematical treatment could entail proper analysis, while they could also take a more practical approach which is a bit more handwavy).
Will the M124 course be equivalent to A level Maths for most universities?
0
reply
artful_lounger
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#6
Report 4 weeks ago
#6
(Original post by maven2k)
Will the M124 course be equivalent to A level Maths for most universities?
I doubt it; you don't go into most topics in the same depth as A-level in MST124 (certainly they're examined at a much easier level than A-level), and some topics occur in the A-level syllabus that aren't covered in MST124 and vice versa. You'd need to contact universities directly to see how it would meet their requirements, but I believe they would probably expect you to take two or more maths modules with the OU to reach that level of equivalence (consider that there is little chance for a single 30 credit module to cover 2 years worth of A-level material!).
0
reply
maven2k
Badges: 13
Rep:
?
#7
Report 4 weeks ago
#7
(Original post by artful_lounger)
I doubt it; you don't go into most topics in the same depth as A-level in MST124 (certainly they're examined at a much easier level than A-level), and some topics occur in the A-level syllabus that aren't covered in MST124 and vice versa. You'd need to contact universities directly to see how it would meet their requirements, but I believe they would probably expect you to take two or more maths modules with the OU to reach that level of equivalence (consider that there is little chance for a single 30 credit module to cover 2 years worth of A-level material!).
Ah, that's unfortunate for me. I wanted to pick M124 after Extended Diploma in Computing to prepare myself for uni content, specifically for maths content. For some reason, I thought it will be accepted by most universities since they have quite a good amount of calculus there and it's definitely much harder than GCSE. I know that Bath university accepts M124 in lieu of A level Maths. I will email Exeter and Glasgow if they accept M124, because they only require B in A level Maths.
0
reply
artful_lounger
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#8
Report 4 weeks ago
#8
(Original post by maven2k)
Ah, that's unfortunate for me. I wanted to pick M124 after Extended Diploma in Computing to prepare myself for uni content, specifically for maths content. For some reason, I thought it will be accepted by most universities since they have quite a good amount of calculus there and it's definitely much harder than GCSE. I know that Bath university accepts M124 in lieu of A level Maths. I will email Exeter and Glasgow if they accept M124, because they only require B in A level Maths.
They might accept it, I'd recommend looking at taking two maths modules with the OU perhaps - you can do MST124 and MST125 concurrently, for example (they interweave the material from the two in a special timetable), or MST124 and one of the stats modules. That would give you a broader and deeper background in maths, and more experience developing your mathematical problem solving ability generally.
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Should there be a new university admissions system that ditches predicted grades?

No, I think predicted grades should still be used to make offers (675)
33.62%
Yes, I like the idea of applying to uni after I received my grades (PQA) (856)
42.63%
Yes, I like the idea of receiving offers only after I receive my grades (PQO) (386)
19.22%
I think there is a better option than the ones suggested (let us know in the thread!) (91)
4.53%

Watched Threads

View All