Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 2 months ago
#1
I was wondering whether anyone has any experience taking a sabbatical during training? Ideally, I want to do an F3 year (have a lot of things I need to do with the time off) but because I'll be applying for the ACF programme, I wanted to maximise my chances at getting a spot (which means applying as an F2).

Therefore, I've thought about taking a year out after the 1st year of ACF (given that I can't defer my start).

Is this a silly idea? I don't want to break the continuity of the training, especially early on, but I really want both things (acf + the year out).
0
reply
Olddreamer
Badges: 8
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 months ago
#2
I can't speak for the medical perspective but as a normal person I honestly think it's a grand idea lol After 5/6 years of medical school, two years of being a junior doctor then many more years of specialisation training a sabbatical is much needed! I found a thread where it's mentioned;
https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=2148414
0
reply
HHaricot
Badges: 9
Rep:
?
#3
Report 2 months ago
#3
(Original post by Anonymous)
I was wondering whether anyone has any experience taking a sabbatical during training? Ideally, I want to do an F3 year (have a lot of things I need to do with the time off) but because I'll be applying for the ACF programme, I wanted to maximise my chances at getting a spot (which means applying as an F2).

Therefore, I've thought about taking a year out after the 1st year of ACF (given that I can't defer my start).

Is this a silly idea? I don't want to break the continuity of the training, especially early on, but I really want both things (acf + the year out).
TBH I’m not sure why you have to apply for ACF as an F2? There are loads of interesting options out there for a more laid back f3. - teaching clinical fellows etc in UK and abroad - which allow you a break and also looking good on a cv? The thing you need to look at is the OOPP probably if once you’ve started ACF. Be aware that there isnt a ‘right’ to it, so it can be turned down. Not sure how often that happens in practice though - not very i would have thought!
Is there someone you can talk through the options with? Each deanery has an academic associate dean, so it seems to me they might be the right person.
0
reply
junior.doctor
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#4
Report 2 months ago
#4
The official term for a sabbatical in doctor-land for trainees is OOP - out of programme. Comes in lots of different kinds:

OOPE - experience. Generally time in an environment you can’t count as training, eg LMI country, or a teaching fellowship. This doesn’t count towards your CCT date.
OOPT - training. Another medical post that the Deanery are willing to count towards your training.
OOPR - research. PhD / MD etc.
OOPC - career break. To do something non medical. Can be for general life circumstances (I had a friend who used it to get through a divorce, another to go through fertility treatment, someone else who just wanted to collect thoughts and think through options). You’re generally limited to what if any locum work you’re allowed to do during this.
OOPP - pause. This is new, came about from Covid. Allows you to work in a UK non training post that’s not your training programme, to get some extra experience in something, and essentially get off the portfolio carousel for a few months.

You generally need to have a clear plan and apply for OOP reasonably well in advance.

None of the OOP are guaranteed when you apply. If you don’t get it first time then you can reapply the following year. I believe the Deanery then have to have an exceptionally good reason for not allowing it.

I don’t know enough about AFP and F3, except to say that taking an F3 is so common these days that I’d be surprised if you’d be penalised that much in an ACP application. But I don’t know.
1
reply
Anonymous #1
#5
Report Thread starter 2 months ago
#5
(Original post by HHaricot)
TBH I’m not sure why you have to apply for ACF as an F2? There are loads of interesting options out there for a more laid back f3. - teaching clinical fellows etc in UK and abroad - which allow you a break and also looking good on a cv? The thing you need to look at is the OOPP probably if once you’ve started ACF. Be aware that there isnt a ‘right’ to it, so it can be turned down. Not sure how often that happens in practice though - not very i would have thought!
Is there someone you can talk through the options with? Each deanery has an academic associate dean, so it seems to me they might be the right person.
Thanks, the reason I want to (not have to) apply in F2 is to maximise my chances - the ACF is what (I think) I want to do in the future. Also, I know that they judge you based on the number of years of experience you have too, so for e.g. they would expect more output from an ST3 applicant vs an F2 applicant.

(Original post by junior.doctor)
The official term for a sabbatical in doctor-land for trainees is OOP - out of programme. Comes in lots of different kinds:

OOPE - experience. Generally time in an environment you can’t count as training, eg LMI country, or a teaching fellowship. This doesn’t count towards your CCT date.
OOPT - training. Another medical post that the Deanery are willing to count towards your training.
OOPR - research. PhD / MD etc.
OOPC - career break. To do something non medical. Can be for general life circumstances (I had a friend who used it to get through a divorce, another to go through fertility treatment, someone else who just wanted to collect thoughts and think through options). You’re generally limited to what if any locum work you’re allowed to do during this.
OOPP - pause. This is new, came about from Covid. Allows you to work in a UK non training post that’s not your training programme, to get some extra experience in something, and essentially get off the portfolio carousel for a few months.

You generally need to have a clear plan and apply for OOP reasonably well in advance.

None of the OOP are guaranteed when you apply. If you don’t get it first time then you can reapply the following year. I believe the Deanery then have to have an exceptionally good reason for not allowing it.

I don’t know enough about AFP and F3, except to say that taking an F3 is so common these days that I’d be surprised if you’d be penalised that much in an ACP application. But I don’t know.
Thanks a lot, this information is new to me and really helpful. From what you've seen is the OOPC the hardest to attain?
0
reply
nexttime
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#6
Report 2 months ago
#6
Some ACFs are ST3 entry - I assume you've factored that in.
0
reply
Anonymous #1
#7
Report Thread starter 2 months ago
#7
(Original post by nexttime)
Some ACFs are ST3 entry - I assume you've factored that in.
As I understand you can apply for ACF even after you start ct training? Are there only ST1 or ST3 options?

So if i complete CT1 during which I am accepted for the ACF, can I move to ST2 as an ACF with a NTN (the following year)?
0
reply
junior.doctor
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#8
Report 2 months ago
#8
(Original post by Anonymous)
Thanks a lot, this information is new to me and really helpful. From what you've seen is the OOPC the hardest to attain?
To the best of my knowledge, there is no difference between the different types of OOP in terms of which is harder to obtain. Three main issue is from a Deanery logistics point of view in terms of them making sure that they still have enough remaining trainees per specialty / rota level to safely maintain staffing in that specialty whilst trying to accommodate OOP requests. So it sort of depends how many of your peers request OOP at the same time, and how many other people are off for eg maternity leave. I don’t know how they decide who gets OOP if there are too many requests.
0
reply
nexttime
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#9
Report 2 months ago
#9
(Original post by Anonymous)
As I understand you can apply for ACF even after you start ct training? Are there only ST1 or ST3 options?

So if i complete CT1 during which I am accepted for the ACF, can I move to ST2 as an ACF with a NTN (the following year)?
Erm I'm not sure. I suppose if its the same speciality it doesn't make too much difference if its ST1 or 2?

I was more thinking about the IMT1 level ACFs vs the ST3 oncology ones, for instance.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Current uni students - are you thinking of dropping out of university?

Yes, I'm seriously considering dropping out (165)
14.58%
I'm not sure (52)
4.59%
No, I'm going to stick it out for now (335)
29.59%
I have already dropped out (34)
3%
I'm not a current university student (546)
48.23%

Watched Threads

View All