bhavyab02
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I recently saw many posts and sources saying biomedical science isn't a good option in terms of job prospects and that healthcare science is more likely to get you a biomedical scientist post in the NHS than Biomed. how true is this and which one is better for career progression ie moving up the bands.

If neither works out I may join an accountancy/finance graduate scheme but again am unsure as to which would be the better one out of the two for this route
pls can you guys reply asap
thanks in advance
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QuentinM
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(Original post by bhavyab02)
I recently saw many posts and sources saying biomedical science isn't a good option in terms of job prospects and that healthcare science is more likely to get you a biomedical scientist post in the NHS than Biomed. how true is this and which one is better for career progression ie moving up the bands.

If neither works out I may join an accountancy/finance graduate scheme but again am unsure as to which would be the better one out of the two for this route
pls can you guys reply asap
thanks in advance
They are two quite different degrees in my experience. I did biomedical sciences, this would be a more "molecular" look at disease (e.g. lab research to find new treatments). Since the early 2000's the NHS has diversified its staff to allow more jobs that aren't nurses/doctors, but who can still help in hospitals, administering treatments etc....and healthcare science is a branch of this, offering training to work as a healthcare scientist in a clinical setting (biomedical sciences won't often work in clinical settings).

It really depends, are you more interested in lab work (to study disease and advance new treatments) or clinical work (e.g. working with patients to help diagnose/treat their illnesses?)? Biomedical sciences would focus generally more on lab work, healthcare sciences on the clinical side, although there may be limited opportunities for overlap between them
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bhavyab02
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(Original post by QuentinM)
They are two quite different degrees in my experience. I did biomedical sciences, this would be a more "molecular" look at disease (e.g. lab research to find new treatments). Since the early 2000's the NHS has diversified its staff to allow more jobs that aren't nurses/doctors, but who can still help in hospitals, administering treatments etc....and healthcare science is a branch of this, offering training to work as a healthcare scientist in a clinical setting (biomedical sciences won't often work in clinical settings).

It really depends, are you more interested in lab work (to study disease and advance new treatments) or clinical work (e.g. working with patients to help diagnose/treat their illnesses?)? Biomedical sciences would focus generally more on lab work, healthcare sciences on the clinical side, although there may be limited opportunities for overlap between them
I like the sound of both. my concern is which would be better for job prospects and a high salary.
p.s I know money isn't everything but its the only thing i can compare the two with
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QuentinM
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(Original post by bhavyab02)
I like the sound of both. my concern is which would be better for job prospects and a high salary.
p.s I know money isn't everything but its the only thing i can compare the two with
Honestly I wouldn't call either of them "well paying careers" but it depends on what you would consider one I guess.

Healthcare sciences is an unknown in that regard for me, as I said its still a relatively new career (only about a decade or so old) so I have no idea to what extent career progression is possible. For Biomedical sciences it depends which route you go down (industry vs academia), both are very competitive but lecturers can earn a reasonable salary IMO
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JDaveOH
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It depends on what you want to do.

If you want to be a biomedical scientist, that is, to work in an NHS pathology lab - you have to hold HCPC registration as a biomedical scientist.

Healthcare science degrees are typically a direct route for registration. The courses are accredited and you often get laboratory placements in order to complete your portfolio (and thus register). That way you can often enter the NHS as a band 5 trainee BMS or band 5 BMS.

You can still become a biomedical scientist without the accredited course but it takes longer as you have to complete a top up course and separate portfolio. You would enter the NHS as a band 2/3/4 if you are lucky.

In my case I studied Biochemistry, entered the NHS as a band 3 MLA; progressed to band 4, and am currently deciding whether or not to complete the top up course and portfolio or not.
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