Don't check first - is it illegal for shops to split multipacks?

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Poll: Is selling multipack items separately illegal?
Yes (21)
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No (11)
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Miss Maddie
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Some products say "Multipack product. Not sold separately"

Do you think this is illegal?




UPDATE: It's LEGAL

More people believe a falsehood. Now you know
Last edited by Miss Maddie; 1 month ago
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Nadim Chowdhury
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I already knew the answer I used to work in a newsagent before but I'll keep it to myself!
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Iñigo de Loyola
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I wouldn't think so. As I said in the Bar the items are the shop owner's personal property and he can do what he wants with them.
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Moonbow
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If they say not to be sold separately, I’d think so. My off licence does this all the time :K:
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londonmyst
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Not illegal.
But if each item contained within the multipack comes with an individual price visible on its packaging, then it may be illegal for the individual/business that resells individually to either: sell direct to customers in excess of the printed price or below minimum alcohol/set unit price (in the same currency).
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Desideri
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Nope. I did look this up before though since my corner shop always does it.
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spotify95
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(Original post by Miss Maddie)
Some products say "Multipack product. Not sold separately"

Do you think this is illegal?

Please don't check first. I want to know your initial thoughts.
If it says "multipack... not to be sold separately", or anything like that, on the item, then it should not be sold as a separate, single item, and must remain as it should be, i.e. a multipack of X items (e.g. multipack of 6 tins of coca cola).

Whether or not it is illegal, I am not so sure. I've purchased single cans of drink that were previously in multipacks, but this was not in a retail shop.

But in any case, if there is a set RRP on the product then this cannot be exceeded.
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DiddyDec
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I doubt there is any criminal law barring it.
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CoolCavy
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No , I did a product design degree and once someone owns a product it is theirs and they can do what they like with it (exceptions being if you signed a contract with whoever sold it to you to not sell separately).
Iirc you can sell multi pack items separately as long as the price is clear on each one (since some multi pack items have prices pre printed on them). The price doesnt have to be the same as the original printed number but the new price should be clear, so stuck over the original tag for example.
Last edited by CoolCavy; 1 month ago
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ANM775
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I sold my FIFA game that came with my ps4 and it said not to be sold seperately and the man at CEX didn't care and gave me £35 for it ...so i'm guessing this sort of stuff isn't illegal
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Catherine1973
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I’d say not illegal but breaking a contract you have with who you bought it from?
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CoolCavy
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(Original post by Catherine1973)
I’d say not illegal but breaking a contract you have with who you bought it from?
There is no contract with whoever you brought it from unless you explicitly sign one. In that instance it would be illegal but a regular transaction is not a contract.
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StriderHort
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(Original post by spotify95)

But in any case, if there is a set RRP on the product then this cannot be exceeded.
They cannot exceed a recommended retail price? The clue is in the first word.
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vix.xvi
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(Original post by Miss Maddie)
Some products say "Multipack product. Not sold separately"

Do you think this is illegal?




Please don't check first. I want to know your initial thoughts.
wait whats the answer?

i put No
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CoolCavy
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(Original post by spotify95)
But in any case, if there is a set RRP on the product then this cannot be exceeded.
It can :yes: it just needs to be made clear where the product is displayed that the RRP is not the price it is being sold for
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Catherine1973
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(Original post by CoolCavy)
There is no contract with whoever you brought it from unless you explicitly sign one. In that instance it would be illegal but a regular transaction is not a contract.
I meant the contact between shopkeeper and their wholesaler? Usually something would be signed as to terms, credit terms etc.
Even then, it would not be illegal? Just a breach of contract one could be sued for.
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RedGiant
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(Original post by Catherine1973)
I meant the contact between shopkeeper and their wholesaler? Usually something would be signed as to terms, credit terms etc.
Even then, it would not be illegal? Just a breach of contract one could be sued for.
That’s a civil matter if it’s a contractual obligation with a wholesaler. Definitely not illegal. Only potentially illegal if it’s somehow in breach of trading standards.
Last edited by RedGiant; 1 month ago
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CoolCavy
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(Original post by Catherine1973)
I meant the contact between shopkeeper and their wholesaler? Usually something would be signed as to terms, credit terms etc.
Even then, it would not be illegal? Just a breach of contract one could be sued for.
I meant the contract between the seller and the shop keeper also, most things brought in bulk dont need a contract. The worst thing that could happen in that circumstance (no contract) is the trader stops selling with you if they find out what you are doing and care enough about it.
Very few places require you to sign a contract before buying something off them as that is a huge waste of time and can put potential customers off from using your service. Usually only brands (a shop buying direct from coca-cola not a third party for instance) or patented products require a contract.
Signing for a delivery or a receipt isnt a contract.
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StriderHort
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(Original post by Catherine1973)
I meant the contact between shopkeeper and their wholesaler? Usually something would be signed as to terms, credit terms etc.
Even then, it would not be illegal? Just a breach of contract one could be sued for.
IME not really? most smaller shop keepers just buy from the cash & carries, they're not under any more weird rules than you or me.
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CoolCavy
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(Original post by RedGiant)
That’s a civil matter if it’s a contractual obligation with a wholesaler. Definitely not illegal. Only potentially illegal if it’s somehow in breach of trading standards.
That's good to know, thanks for the correction
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