firefly27489
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#1
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I’m thinking about doing a degree in management for three/ four years. After I have completed my degree I would like to do a GDL followed by an LPC.

Many people studying a law degree/ or any other general degree, have connections and contracts with law firms which in turn pay for the complete charge of the GDL and LPC and immediately start a traineeship with the student. I was just wondering, as someone who is going to start their first year of their management degree, how can I build a relationship with a law firm so that it’s contracted, thus they pay for my funds required for the GDL and LPC and I would in turn work in their firm as a solicitor once I have finished my training.

I have heard that a lot of firms do this but I am unsure as to how I am going to get there.
Would it be harder for me as a management student?
What would I have to do, how would I contact them, when would I contact them?
Do I have to be a law student (studying the traditional three year law course) to start shadowing lawyers at law firms and gaining experience/ rapport and a connection with big London firms (magic circle firms even) or would law firms not allow me since I am a management student and not going to be studying law as a degree?
If I can, would I start this in my first year?
When would I start calling up or sending applications to law firms?

So many questions, but I hope someone can offer some advice and provide answers!
Last edited by firefly27489; 11 months ago
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RV3112
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(Original post by emgx123)
I’m thinking about doing a degree in management for three/ four years. After I have completed my degree I would like to do a GDL followed by an LPC. Many people studying a law degree/ or any other general degree, have connections and contracts with law firms which in turn pay for the complete charge of the GDL and LPC and immediately start a traineeship with the student. I was just wondering, as someone who is going to start their first year of their management degree, how can I build a relationship with a law firm so that it’s contracted, thus they pay for my funds required for the GDL and LPC and I would in turn work in their firm as a solicitor once I have finished my training. I have heard that a lot of firms do this but I am unsure as to how I am going to get there. Would it be harder for me as a management student? What would I have to do, how would I contact them, when would I contact them? Do I have to be a law student (studying the traditional three year law course) to start shadowing lawyers at law firms and gaining experience/ rapport and a connection with big London firms (magic circle firms even) or would law firms not allow me since I am a management student and not going to be studying law as a degree? If I can, would I start this in my first year? When would I start calling up or sending applications to law firms?
You don't need to be a law student to obtain experience. Vac schemes will still be open for you, although some may require you to be in the final year of your degree as a non-law student.

If you have already made the decision to become a solicitor, it might be worth reflecting on your reasons for the management degree, especially if you are concerned with experience etc. Whilst plenty of non-law graduates become solicitors, as it requires an extra year of study to do the GDL (and it is more intense), ensure that this is the best path for your personally.
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999tigger
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(Original post by emgx123)
I’m thinking about doing a degree in management for three/ four years. After I have completed my degree I would like to do a GDL followed by an LPC. Many people studying a law degree/ or any other general degree, have connections and contracts with law firms which in turn pay for the complete charge of the GDL and LPC and immediately start a traineeship with the student. I was just wondering, as someone who is going to start their first year of their management degree, how can I build a relationship with a law firm so that it’s contracted, thus they pay for my funds required for the GDL and LPC and I would in turn work in their firm as a solicitor once I have finished my training. I have heard that a lot of firms do this but I am unsure as to how I am going to get there. Would it be harder for me as a management student? What would I have to do, how would I contact them, when would I contact them? Do I have to be a law student (studying the traditional three year law course) to start shadowing lawyers at law firms and gaining experience/ rapport and a connection with big London firms (magic circle firms even) or would law firms not allow me since I am a management student and not going to be studying law as a degree? If I can, would I start this in my first year? When would I start calling up or sending applications to law firms?
You will probably get more replies if you use paragraphs and break it down into specific questions you want answered.
Much easier for the reader to answer then. By the time you graduate the GDL and LPC wont exist for new candidates and you will be on the SQE.
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firefly27489
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(Original post by 999tigger)
You will probably get more replies if you use paragraphs and break it down into specific questions you want answered.
Much easier for the reader to answer then. By the time you graduate the GDL and LPC wont exist for new candidates and you will be on the SQE.
The SQE requires examinations in Stage 1, how can I supposed to do exams if I haven’t studied law? Since I am going to be a management student.

In addition to this, throughout the SQE process, I am going to be competing with law graduates. Given I will not have the same amount of experience and knowledge as a graduate of law, how am I supposed to prepare to do exams given I will know little about the subject of law?

Previously, through the GDL this was taught throughout a course of a year thus it had not been a problem. However, the SQE is not a course, simply just exams, putting non-law graduates at a disadvantage as we do not have the prior knowledge or education required to sit an exam in law.
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RV3112
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(Original post by emgx123)
The SQE requires examinations in Stage 1, how can I supposed to do exams if I haven’t studied law? Since I am going to be a management student.

In addition to this, throughout the SQE process, I am going to be competing with law graduates. Given I will not have the same amount of experience and knowledge as a graduate of law, how am I supposed to prepare to do exams given I will know little about the subject of law?

Previously, through the GDL this was taught throughout a course of a year thus it had not been a problem. However, the SQE is not a course, simply just exams, putting non-law graduates at a disadvantage as we do not have the prior knowledge or education required to sit an exam in law.
The GDL will continue to exist after the SQE is introduced, at least in substance. Some form of conversion course will be available. Its compulsory nature will be removed.
Last edited by RV3112; 11 months ago
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999tigger
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(Original post by emgx123)
The SQE requires examinations in Stage 1, how can I supposed to do exams if I haven’t studied law? Since I am going to be a management student.

In addition to this, throughout the SQE process, I am going to be competing with law graduates. Given I will not have the same amount of experience and knowledge as a graduate of law, how am I supposed to prepare to do exams given I will know little about the subject of law?

Previously, through the GDL this was taught throughout a course of a year thus it had not been a problem. However, the SQE is not a course, simply just exams, putting non-law graduates at a disadvantage as we do not have the prior knowledge or education required to sit an exam in law.
It will be harder, but thats something for you to sort out before. Presumably from pre reading and work. You will just have to study.

Your firm might allow you more time before you take the exams.
Stage one of the SQE will be based on legal knowledge, so similar to the GDL.
You might be employed or you might not but you will have to prepare for the part 1 exams.
Law students will have an advantage but so they should, its no different than it is now.
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