when will strength gains come bk

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username5194026
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so basically i was enjoying going gym everyday from oct last year up until around end of march and loved the gains i was getting. gained bout 20kg in 8 months and was finally looking beefy.

then quarantine happens and my dumbass just gamed all day and just 'quit' working out.
now i was watching sum yt vids and since i've got so much spare time might as well be productive and work out again.

my muscle is still there but my strength i've probs lost like 50%. so how long do i need to w/o again b4 it comes back.
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SuperHuman98
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I was active during quarantine and I still lost some strength. Probably because I also lost weight.

I’m doing Linear progression for a few weeks then back to normal training as linear progression isn’t sustainable for me. I’m about 2 weeks away from normal strength. Then back to my regular training.

I lost about 30kg on my squat and more on my deadlift. My OHP and bench press I lost around 10-15kg.

Tomorrow I am squatting 100kg and pre pandemic I was at 120kg so nearly there aha.

Muscle memory is legit so you will be fine give yourself 1-2 months
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username5194026
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(Original post by SuperHuman98)
I was active during quarantine and I still lost some strength. Probably because I also lost weight.

I’m doing Linear progression for a few weeks then back to regular training. I’m about 2 weeks away from normal strength. Then back to my regular training.

I lost about 30kg on my squat and more on my deadlift. My OHP and bench press I lost around 10-15kg.
squat pr was 80.
bench was 60
deadlift was 110.

im not bothered about my body/wanna get jacked. just need to be outside and not in my house all day.
hopefully end of year i can regain my stuff and get to 100 squat.

since i quit playing video games now i just wanna put all the extra time into gym and my college work. besides being tall and buff is pretty hot
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SuperHuman98
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(Original post by thatman100)
squat pr was 80.
bench was 60
deadlift was 110.

im not bothered about my body/wanna get jacked. just need to be outside and not in my house all day.

hopefully end of year i can regain my stuff and get to 100 squat.
Definitely possible just got to find a good programme. Good programme will help you get strong and jacked and out of the house

Also don’t be afraid to start light I had to deadlift 105kg on my first week even though I was doing 180 pre pandemic. Your muscles will remember what it’s like and you’ll improve quickly
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username5194026
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(Original post by SuperHuman98)
Definitely possible just got to find a good programme. Good programme will help you get strong and jacked and out of the house
i was on a good programme i forgot the name though. until sept imma train calves arms shoulders with my weights at home then do split workout at gym.

how long you been at it?
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SuperHuman98
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(Original post by thatman100)
i was on a good programme i forgot the name though. until sept imma train calves arms shoulders with my weights at home then do split workout at gym.

how long you been at it?
I’ve been going gym for 3ish years now but I only really learned how to train and diet properly last November and that’s the period I have made most of my progress (Nov to March). But the time before that I appreciate as it helped build consistency and okay technique and I’ve already gone through most of the mistakes
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username5194026
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(Original post by SuperHuman98)
I’ve been going gym for 3ish years now but I only really learned how to train and diet properly last November and that’s the period I have made most of my progress (Nov to March). But the time before that I appreciate as it helped build consistency and okay technique and I’ve already gone through most of the mistakes
damn thats sick. i was at it for just over 6 months. was doing well but i got lazy af. hopefully i can get back to 75kkg before school starts in sept probs 70 rn
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Nutritionist
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Nobody can give you an exact number but it will be faster than it took to originally develop them
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Khanthebrit
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Hey man, I was an intermediate/advanced novice by the end of March with a 180kg deads, 140kg squats, 100kg bench, and 65kg OHP all lifts x 5. Took me about 6 months on a hard Linear Progression scheme and I've regressed.

I've jumped back onto Linear Progression and recommended it for anyone. A few benefits:
1) You'll start off stronger than your last starting point on LP.
2) You'll be able to get away with 5kg jumps even longer before dropping to 2.5kg.
3) Mentally it's great. Getting stronger workout - to workout once again.
4) For me, I'll be able to get back to hit new PRs within 2-3 months. That's not a bad trade-off for a 4 month lay off and have lost 20lbs over quarantine.

Don't get disheartened for something that's out of your control. if you don't know anyone with a home gym or have the money to splash on one yourself, then there's nothing you can do but wait. Good news though is you'll only lose 2 months of getting back to where you were as opposed to spending thousands on a gym.
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username5194026
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(Original post by Khanthebrit)
Hey man, I was an intermediate/advanced novice by the end of March with a 180kg deads, 140kg squats, 100kg bench, and 65kg OHP all lifts x 5. Took me about 6 months on a hard Linear Progression scheme and I've regressed.

I've jumped back onto Linear Progression and recommended it for anyone. A few benefits:
1) You'll start off stronger than your last starting point on LP.
2) You'll be able to get away with 5kg jumps even longer before dropping to 2.5kg.
3) Mentally it's great. Getting stronger workout - to workout once again.
4) For me, I'll be able to get back to hit new PRs within 2-3 months. That's not a bad trade-off for a 4 month lay off and have lost 20lbs over quarantine.

Don't get disheartened for something that's out of your control. if you don't know anyone with a home gym or have the money to splash on one yourself, then there's nothing you can do but wait. Good news though is you'll only lose 2 months of getting back to where you were as opposed to spending thousands on a gym.
I was on the 5x5 novice programme. Do you think i should do lp first then 5x5?

I was adding weight 5kg every week on squats. 5kg on deads and 2.5 bench.
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Khanthebrit
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(Original post by thatman100)
I was on the 5x5 novice programme. Do you think i should do lp first then 5x5?
5x5 is a good Novice Linear Progression Programme. Something like Stronglifts will get you stronger. I don't see a problem with it, however, for me and most of the population, a 3x5 stress is more than enough to trigger the stress - recovery - adapt cycle workout to workout. For this reason, I prefer Starting Strength - it saves time in the gym, less stressful while still causing an adaptation and also less risk of overtraining. At some point on a 5x5 program, you would have to drop to 3x5 anyway because the volume will just become too much to recover from workout to workout. Not only that but mentally having to squat 5x5 130kg squats just doesn't board as well when you can create recoverable stress at 3x5 and make it easier for yourself. Also as much as people can hate on Mark Rippetoe for his wacky political views, he is an expert in the field of strength and provides an abundance of information in his books and videos on how to get strong and the science behind it.
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username5194026
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(Original post by Khanthebrit)
5x5 is a good Novice Linear Progression Programme. Something like Stronglifts will get you stronger. I don't see a problem with it, however, for me and most of the population, a 3x5 stress is more than enough to trigger the stress - recovery - adapt cycle workout to workout. For this reason, I prefer Starting Strength - it saves time in the gym, less stressful while still causing an adaptation and also less risk of overtraining. At some point on a 5x5 program, you would have to drop to 3x5 anyway because the volume will just become too much to recover from workout to workout. Not only that but mentally having to squat 5x5 130kg squats just doesn't board as well when you can create recoverable stress at 3x5 and make it easier for yourself. Also as much as people can hate on Mark Rippetoe for his wacky political views, he is an expert in the field of strength and provides an abundance of information in his books and videos on how to get strong and the science behind it.
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Size:  108.7 KB so instead of 5x5 these lifts i can do 3 sets of 5 and still get the same gains?

I eventually hated squats because 5 sets was so much once i was like 5 weeks in adding 5kg so hopefully 3x is better mentally 2
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Khanthebrit
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(Original post by thatman100)
Name:  20200809_123706.jpg
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Size:  108.7 KB so instead of 5x5 these lifts i can do 3 sets of 5 and still get the same gains?

I eventually hated squats because 5 sets was so much once i was like 5 weeks in adding 5kg so hopefully 3x is better mentally 2
Yes. If you switch them to 3x5 you will still certainly see gains. The stress is enough, you will just have to ensure you allow for optimum recovery - lots of sleep, food and protein etc. Also if you're 5 weeks in you should probably revert to smaller incremental increases - 2.5kg per session for all lifts but perhaps the deadlift, which can go up to 5kg jumps for a bit longer.

Adding 15kg each week to the squat in Novice LP is only supposed to go as far for maybe 1 - 2 weeks, perhaps 3 if you started off very light to ingrain form.

Remember, It's easier to not get stuck than to get unstuck.
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username5194026
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(Original post by Khanthebrit)
Yes. If you switch them to 3x5 you will still certainly see gains. The stress is enough, you will just have to ensure you allow for optimum recovery - lots of sleep, food and protein etc. Also if you're 5 weeks in you should probably revert to smaller incremental increases - 2.5kg per session for all lifts but perhaps the deadlift, which can go up to 5kg jumps for a bit longer.

Adding 15kg each week to the squat in Novice LP is only supposed to go as far for maybe 1 - 2 weeks, perhaps 3 if you started off very light to ingrain form.

Remember, It's easier to not get stuck than to get unstuck.
Ye i went from 40kg to 65kg. I got stuck a few times and kept the weight for like an extra week or lowered it for a few days.



Yea when i get to like 80kg x5 ill probs lower it i feel like ive got more in me i can continue doing 5kg a week



Thanks for the help bro appreciate it
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SuperHuman98
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thatman100

Linear progression is a good idea for regaining your strength.

However SL5x5 is not a good overall programme. For many reasons as listed here https://thefitness.wiki/faq/starting...t-recommended/

I would do LP but then change to something more intermediate once you get close to your old strength. I made way better progress with periodisation.

My advice is based on my experience with these ‘beginner programmes’
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(Original post by Khanthebrit)
5x5 is a good Novice Linear Progression Programme. Something like Stronglifts will get you stronger. I don't see a problem with it, however, for me and most of the population, a 3x5 stress is more than enough to trigger the stress - recovery - adapt cycle workout to workout. For this reason, I prefer Starting Strength - it saves time in the gym, less stressful while still causing an adaptation and also less risk of overtraining. At some point on a 5x5 program, you would have to drop to 3x5 anyway because the volume will just become too much to recover from workout to workout. Not only that but mentally having to squat 5x5 130kg squats just doesn't board as well when you can create recoverable stress at 3x5 and make it easier for yourself. Also as much as people can hate on Mark Rippetoe for his wacky political views, he is an expert in the field of strength and provides an abundance of information in his books and videos on how to get strong and the science behind it.
Here are a list of the issues with SL5x5. Let me know what you think. Personally I am not a fan of it and Rippetoes programme

https://thefitness.wiki/faq/starting...t-recommended/
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Khanthebrit
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(Original post by SuperHuman98)
thatman100

Linear progression is a good idea for regaining your strength.

However SL5x5 is not a good overall programme. For many reasons as listed here https://thefitness.wiki/faq/starting...t-recommended/

I would do LP but then change to something more intermediate once you get close to your old strength. I made way better progress with periodisation.

My advice is based on my experience with these ‘beginner programmes’
I agree that if you're solely looking for a hypertrophy programme, SS and SL are not the way to go about it. The rep ranges and rest times aren't adequate enough to specialize in increasing muscle size. However, a bigger cross-sectional muscle belly correlates as a stronger muscle. Starting Strength will offer hypertrophy, but its main focus is increasing force production against a loaded barbell, correlating to strength and an increased force against the environment. This is why it prescribes sets of 5. Bang in the middle of strength and hypertrophy.

However, anyone I see, of really any relative non-obese mass, overhead pressing 70kg - 80kg x5, something Starting Strength can offer, or it's intermediate TM (or other strength-related programs), does have big arms. I'm not necessarily talking bodybuilding pure muscle, but visible mass to show that they can lift such a weight above their head.

Someone looking solely to go into hypertrophy, shouldn't be benching 60kg x 8 - 12. He should be benching 100kg+ x 8 - 12. What could take years to get to can be accomplished in SS within 6 - 12 months. Once a novice exhausts his LP, he puts himself in a prime position to then actually play with the big weights necessary for increasing muscle mass.
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SuperHuman98
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(Original post by Khanthebrit)
I agree that if you're solely looking for a hypertrophy programme, SS and SL are not the way to go about it. The rep ranges and rest times aren't adequate enough to specialize in increasing muscle size. However, a bigger cross-sectional muscle belly correlates as a stronger muscle. Starting Strength will offer hypertrophy, but its main focus is increasing force production against a loaded barbell, correlating to strength and an increased force against the environment. This is why it prescribes sets of 5. Bang in the middle of strength and hypertrophy.

However, anyone I see, of really any relative non-obese mass, overhead pressing 70kg - 80kg x5, something Starting Strength can offer, or it's intermediate TM (or other strength-related programs), does have big arms.

Someone looking solely to go into hypertrophy, shouldn't be benching 60kg x 8 - 12. He should be benching 100kg+ x 8 - 12. What could take years to get to can be accomplished in SS within 6 - 12 months Once a novice exhausts his LP, he puts himself in a prime position to then actually play with the big weights necessary for increasing muscle mass.
All good programmes will give you strength and hypertrophy because stronger muscle is bigger muscle. (Which we agree on).

i don’t think I agree that 5 is the best amount of reps. There should be a mix of rep ranges and that is one of SS’s flaw.

also I highly doubt the majority of people on SS or SL can get to 100kg bench for 8x12.There is not enough bench volume. (Especially under 83kg beginners)

I compete (Well it got cancelled in April) in powerlifting and I am lucky to have a friend coach me. Once he showed me periodisation I made much better gains than I ever did on LP.

I think the GZCL method and also 5/3/1 Are good methods that require some reading (and just download a spreadsheet for free online).

Calgary Barbell programmes are good too, and Candito’s programmes.

The authors are so much more credible than Mehdi and Rip.

Also for most people at best they run LP for 3 months. Especially the type of Lp in SL and SS which is every workout. It seems like you have had great success with SL but I think your a minority case especially since you managed it for 6months good job
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(Original post by SuperHuman98)
All good programmes will give you strength and hypertrophy because stronger muscle is bigger muscle. (Which we agree on).

i don’t think I agree that 5 is the best amount of reps. There should be a mix of rep ranges and that is one of SS’s flaw.

also I highly doubt the majority of people on SS or SL can get to 100kg bench for 8x12.There is not enough bench volume. (Especially under 83kg beginners)

I compete (Well it got cancelled in April) in powerlifting and I am lucky to have a friend coach me. Once he showed me periodisation I made much better gains than I ever did on LP.

I think the GZCL method and also 5/3/1 Are good methods that require some reading (and just download a spreadsheet for free online).

Calgary Barbell programmes are good too, and Candito’s programmes.

The authors are so much more credible than Mehdi and Rip
I think the whole point of linear progression though is that there doesn't need to be such a high amount of volume. It's the intensity which is driving up progress - 2.5kg added to the barbell every workout, down to perhaps 1kg each time on the upper body during late stages. Novices respond very easily to training stress quickly, and sets of 3x5 (I think) seem to be enough.

Once you get to an intermediate programme, applying that stress through volume becomes a little more necessary. For instance, the Texas Method implements the first workout as 5x5 volume day, and bloody hell, that certainly does get very hard. Especially when squatting in the 400lbs (I had a friend on it, I myself had only transitioned but yeah he hated Mondays).

I don't think volume is the problem. I think the problem is once people exhaust their Novice gains, they don't increase the volume. At that point it needs to be done, but people complain it's not working because there's not enough volume when in reality they're on the wrong programme and need to move into more intermediate territory.
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SuperHuman98
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(Original post by Khanthebrit)
I think the whole point of linear progression though is that there doesn't need to be such a high amount of volume. It's the intensity which is driving up progress - 2.5kg added to the barbell every workout, down to perhaps 1kg each time on the upper body during late stages. Novices respond very easily to training stress quickly, and sets of 3x5 (I think) seem to be enough.

Once you get to an intermediate programme, applying that stress through volume becomes a little more necessary. For instance, the Texas Method implements the first workout as 5x5 volume day, and bloody hell, that certainly does get very hard. Especially when squatting in the 400lbs (I had a friend on it, I myself had only transitioned but yeah he hated Mondays).
Yeah I guess that only driving growth through intensity is good for absolute beginners. However I just wouldn’t stick with it too long. When I was a beginner I saw it as the be all and end all and that if I wasn’t squatting 100kg then LP could still work (which wasn’t the case for me).

Ive made great gains through intermediate programming. Using the GZCL method. It splits exercises by T1,T2,T3. T1 being SBD. T2 = variations that strengthen your weakeness of T1. For example paused back squats. And T3 being basically stuff like tricep push downs, leg curls etc... I would then test my progress every 4 weeks because there is more to strength than just putting weight on the bar every workout. Instead I was getting stronger at different rep ranges and PR with AMRAP sets. Then at the 4th week I test my previous 95% and found that I always improved quite a bit

I made great gains on that more intermediate style. Adding in incline bench as a T2 helped both my OHP and Bench for example.

When I did that I was only at 90kg squat, 130kg DL, 80kg bench at 68kg bw (and had already stalled out Linear progression). After 16 weeks I got to 180kg DL, 100kg bench, 120kg squat. (Squats my weakest for some reason haha). Then gyms closed.

I do think tho that there are better programmes than SS and SL5x5 including better linear progression programmes
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