gravitational force depending on the distance between two astronomical objects

Watch
universalcj
Badges: 12
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 2 months ago
#1
hello guys so the force = Gmm/r^2 right?

but does this r mean the distance between closest facing surfaces or between the centre of two astronomical object
0
reply
Joinedup
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#2
Report 2 months ago
#2
it's between the centres of mass. you can think of the centre of mass of an object as being the average position of the mass of all the particles making the object up. large astronomical bodies are usually spheres (or close to being spheres) so take it as being the centre of the object for planets & stars.

or you could also think that there's a gravitational force on everyday objects sitting on the Earths surface where the distance to the surface is zero or close to zero.
1
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Current uni students - are you thinking of dropping out of university?

Yes, I'm seriously considering dropping out (176)
14.53%
I'm not sure (56)
4.62%
No, I'm going to stick it out for now (354)
29.23%
I have already dropped out (35)
2.89%
I'm not a current university student (590)
48.72%

Watched Threads

View All