Boring well-paid or satisfying low-paid job? Watch

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Jamie Frost
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I'm sure a lot of people here are quite ambitious and academic. Hence it is likely these sorts of people will go on to get high-paid jobs.
However, although jobs like programmers/analysts/accountants/lawyers/etc are highly paid, many such jobs are boring and/or stressful.
I used to be highly ambitious and wanted to get up as high as possible on the job ladder for some much-salary job. But I was talking to and old teacher of mine recently about my interests in becoming a (maths) teacher, and she said although her Cambridge friends had gone on to earn high salaries and obviously liked having the extra disposable income, they weren't nearly as happy and satisfied with their jobs as she was teaching.

So faced with the choice of having a lucrative high-paid job that is not all that satisfying, or a much lower paid job which you find satisfaction with, what would you choose?
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Lil' Miss Smiley
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Job satisfaction is the thing that keeps you going even when you feel a little of peak. So i would go with low paid
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rainjan_4now
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The fact that i want to be a research scientist says it all. Caring too much about how much you earn means that you want to look good in comparison to others- which is very superficial.
HOWEVER- if you earn alot, but enjoy what you do-i.e. being a doctor, then thats fine with me, it's just those people that choose where to work on a salary basis that grinds me up the grater. :hmpf:
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Howard
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(Original post by Jamie Frost)
I'm sure a lot of people here are quite ambitious and academic. Hence it is likely these sorts of people will go on to get high-paid jobs.
However, although jobs like programmers/analysts/accountants/lawyers/etc are highly paid, many such jobs are boring and/or stressful.
I used to be highly ambitious and wanted to get up as high as possible on the job ladder for some much-salary job. But I was talking to and old teacher of mine recently about my interests in becoming a (maths) teacher, and she said although her Cambridge friends had gone on to earn high salaries and obviously liked having the extra disposable income, they weren't nearly as happy and satisfied with their jobs as she was teaching.

So faced with the choice of having a lucrative high-paid job that is not all that satisfying, or a much lower paid job which you find satisfaction with, what would you choose?
I think you need to find a middle path. It's no good having a job you love but depending on the Salvation Army for meals.
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No Future
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I don't want to be a programmer personally, but many people do find that stuff interesting - but programming isn't very highly paid. You can move up to other computer related jobs though which can be more interesting and better paid. For example computer security.

Personally, I think being a lawyer IS very interesting! The pay is good too, but the competition is intense...
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Sam2k
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I agree with howard. You have to make as much as you need, but you should also find something you enjoy doing.
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HaggenDaZ
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I'd like to have good job satisfaction as well as a decent salary when I graduate: say £22,000

Can I just say that a Doctor earns all nowadays for what he or she does.
Alexander
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There are virtually no genuinely low-paid (by which I mean £5 or £6 an hour) jobs which are also interesting. I think what the thread starter means is extremely well-paid but boring jobs versus moderately well-paid but interesting jobs. However there are also plenty of people who think very well-paid jobs are also interesting (even if stressful and hard work at times).
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Howard
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(Original post by HaggenDaZ)
I'd like to have good job satisfaction as well as a decent salary when I graduate: say £22,000

Can I just say that a Doctor earns all nowadays for what he or she does.
What does he/she do that warrants such high reward?
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HaggenDaZ
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(Original post by Howard)
What does he/she do that warrants such high reward?
Job satisfaction from helping people.
Natalie Lane
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(Original post by cindy)
Job satisfaction is the thing that keeps you going even when you feel a little of peak. So i would go with low paid
agreed...
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Howard
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(Original post by HaggenDaZ)
Job satisfaction from helping people.
Bit of a cliche isn't it?

I'd have thought that spending day after day signing off sick notes for the same old faces could potentially be pretty soul destroying stuff. I seriously doubt the average GP returns home each night with a spring in his step. It's hardly "ER"
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Bilal
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(Original post by Howard)
Bit of a cliche isn't it?

I'd have thought that spending day after day signing off sick notes for the same old faces could potentially be pretty soul destroying stuff. I seriously doubt the average GP returns home each night with a spring in his step. It's hardly "ER"
They diagnose patients mate.

How does one find out that they've got cancer etc?
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Howard
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(Original post by Bilal786)
They diagnose patients mate.

How does one find out that they've got cancer etc?
I don't think GP's diagnose patients with cancer as a rule. That I think would be a cancer specialist.

The GP would rather cleverly recognize the fact that a visitor to his clinic wasn't very well ("Cripes......you look awful!") and refer him to a consultant ("I'm making an appointment for you to see Dr.Ingham at the Imperial Testical Ward") That's about the extent of the GP's contribution to the diagnosis.

For the remainder of the morning's surgery our talented GP will sign about 200 sick notes for the work shy congregation sitting in the waiting room and another 200 prozac prescriptions for the "depressed".

Not my idea of a fun and glamorous way to make a living.
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Weejimmie
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Most people have boring and badly-paid jobs. You're pretty lucky not to end up in one.
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Bilal
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Ok maybe try other conditions like Diabetes etc.

What about hospital doctors work? What do you think of them?
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Howard
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(Original post by Bilal786)
Ok maybe try other conditions like Diabetes etc.

What about hospital doctors work? What do you think of them?
I'm not talking about hospital doctors. Or astronauts. I'm talking (very tongue in cheek) about how I perceive the day to day work of a GP and how I fail to see how any job satisfaction can be derived from it.
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Bilal
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(Original post by Howard)
I'm not talking about hospital doctors. Or astronauts. I'm talking (very tongue in cheek) about how I perceive the day to day work of a GP and how I fail to see how any job satisfaction can be derived from it.
You shadowed any GP's then?
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Howard
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(Original post by Bilal786)
You shadowed any GP's then?
No. I just said it's a tongue in cheek perception. Can you read or is this coming out in Mandarin at your end?
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Sarky
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(Original post by Howard)
I'm not talking about hospital doctors. Or astronauts. I'm talking (very tongue in cheek) about how I perceive the day to day work of a GP and how I fail to see how any job satisfaction can be derived from it.

I see why you think it might be like that, but a lot of people depend on their GP's for more than just sick notes. They hold a position of trust, they are able to diagnose people with a wide range of conditions in around 10 mins. I watched a GP figure out a girl had had a Transient Aschemic Attack (a mini stroke) in 5 mins based very little evidence. They also provide emotional support and have continued relationships with people, many over decades.

I know you were being tongue in cheek, just thought i'd give my take on what i've seen as i once had a similar opinion.
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