Username123489
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Will law firms allow COVID 19 as mitigating circumstances for lower alevel grades as I am currently awaiting them and have not sat any exams for them.
Also will law firms lower their alevel requirements
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999tigger
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(Original post by Username123489)
Will law firms allow COVID 19 as mitigating circumstances for lower alevel grades as I am currently awaiting them and have not sat any exams for them.
Also will law firms lower their alevel requirements
Law firms and not unis?
If you really mean law firms, then its up to them.
Unless theres soemthing exceptional then wouldnt it be the same for everyone?
I dont really see law firms lowering entry requirements as they will get enough applications from those with the grades.
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RV3112
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(Original post by Username123489)
Will law firms allow COVID 19 as mitigating circumstances for lower alevel grades as I am currently awaiting them and have not sat any exams for them.
Also will law firms lower their alevel requirements
Probably not, without anything more substantial. All students have been affected by COVID-19 so it wouldn't really make any difference to take it into account.

It's unlikely, given the process that it is being followed this year, that firms will lower their A-level requirements. It really wouldn't make any sense for them to do so. Standardisation will mean that the distribution of grades will not be that different from previous years.
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Username123489
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(Original post by RV3112)
Probably not, without anything more substantial. All students have been affected by COVID-19 so it wouldn't really make any difference to take it into account.

It's unlikely, given the process that it is being followed this year, that firms will lower their A-level requirements. It really wouldn't make any sense for them to do so. Standardisation will mean that the distribution of grades will not be that different from previous years.
I would have thought they would have excused this year due to no one sitting exams also as it looks from the Scottish sqa most grades were unfair
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RV3112
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(Original post by Username123489)
I would have thought they would have excused this year due to no one sitting exams also as it looks from the Scottish sqa most grades were unfair
Students are still receiving grades though, despite no exams. In theory, because of standardisation, a similar amount of students should get AAA under this process, as have done in previous years. Therefore, it doesn't really make sense that they would adjust their expectations.

Regarding the potential for unfairness, it's an interesting and valid point, but i don't expect (the majority at least) of firms to try and engage in an analysis of whether or not your individual grades were fair or not.

However, there is no way to be absolutely certain what firms will do until it comes time for them to consider this year's cohort, so this is just guesswork.
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999tigger
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(Original post by Username123489)
I would have thought they would have excused this year due to no one sitting exams also as it looks from the Scottish sqa most grades were unfair
Mitigating circumstances is mostly for school and university.
Law firms are businesses and not a group of social workers.
Everyone has had covid to deal with in some form.
Expect top firms to have enough candidates who made the grades anyway.
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Username123489
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(Original post by Username123489)
Will law firms allow COVID 19 as mitigating circumstances for lower alevel grades as I am currently awaiting them and have not sat any exams for them.
Also will law firms lower their alevel requirements
So just a quick update guys I got my alevel results on Thursday and let’s say it didn’t go to plan I got BCE but I am going to appeal against the E and if not do the exam in October
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Wossh
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(Original post by Username123489)
So just a quick update guys I got my alevel results on Thursday and let’s say it didn’t go to plan I got BCE but I am going to appeal against the E and if not do the exam in October
If you are only appealing the E presumably you are satisfied with the B and C. I think you have bigger worries for securing a TC than mitigating circumstances.
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Username123489
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(Original post by Wossh)
If you are only appealing the E presumably you are satisfied with the B and C. I think you have bigger worries for securing a TC than mitigating circumstances.
I have appealed against all my grades as I don’t feel it’s a fair representation but however I will not need a training contract as I will be going through the SQE
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(Original post by Username123489)
I have appealed against all my grades as I don’t feel it’s a fair representation but however I will not need a training contract as I will be going through the SQE
Hi. With regards to the SQE I think you might have been misguided. I think its largely down to the awful marketing by the SRA and LPC providers. The law firms who stipulate A-Level grade requirements tend to be the larger corporate firms. When the SQE eventually comes in those same firms will still be just as ruthless in recruiting for their Period of recognised training.

It will largely be a case of that where you train will be hugely important quite similar to what it is now. Having been to a few sixth forms to present firm events alot of students are under the impression that the SQE is some sort of gateway to the magic circle or Kirkland without the need for the competitive application process. Those firms will STILL use the same recruitment method and if anything it will be a bigger candidate pool than before.

There are HUGE issues with the SQE and I wouldnt be surprised if it is delayed further or ultimately scrapped. It is an awful method to increase diversity when it will create an even bigger divide just two years later than what it does currently.
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Username123489
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(Original post by JYP17)
Hi. With regards to the SQE I think you might have been misguided. I think its largely down to the awful marketing by the SRA and LPC providers. The law firms who stipulate A-Level grade requirements tend to be the larger corporate firms. When the SQE eventually comes in those same firms will still be just as ruthless in recruiting for their Period of recognised training.

It will largely be a case of that where you train will be hugely important quite similar to what it is now. Having been to a few sixth forms to present firm events alot of students are under the impression that the SQE is some sort of gateway to the magic circle or Kirkland without the need for the competitive application process. Those firms will STILL use the same recruitment method and if anything it will be a bigger candidate pool than before.

There are HUGE issues with the SQE and I wouldnt be surprised if it is delayed further or ultimately scrapped. It is an awful method to increase diversity when it will create an even bigger divide just two years later than what it does currently.
So what would you recommend I do ?
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Username123489
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What would you suggest I do them in terms of my alevels
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username5375630
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(Original post by Username123489)
What would you suggest I do them in terms of my alevels
Okay so without knowing much about your situation or the how this absolutely awful A-level system works, I would suggest you appeal. I really do not know how well you did at GCSES or what you were expecting from your A-levels but if you were one of those students who could/should have got A*AA/AAA and similar top marks then you could look at sitting the exams in October. Again, this is very much dependent on your situation.

Law is and has been for years a very competitive field. A lot of people seem to forget that its not "am I good enough" the real question is am I within the top 100 candidates of the 3,000 applying here. Similarly am I within the top 12 of the 1,500 candidates applying here (as is the case at some US firms).

When your application is reviewed it will be looked at from every aspect from grades to career commitment. Grades can sometimes be offset by commitment elsewhere but it again goes back to the above point, where there are 3,000 applications will that application be within the top 100. There are numerous ways to improve it past your grades and especially A-levels, maybe if you score 70% in every module from a top university you will have offset the A-levels. Similarly if you get a first from a top university and had 11A* then again you can show your potential.

All of this is very flaky information as I simply do not know if you even want to work at these firms and if you want to go into the corporate law route. Happy to help further if you require.
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Username123489
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(Original post by JYP17)
Okay so without knowing much about your situation or the how this absolutely awful A-level system works, I would suggest you appeal. I really do not know how well you did at GCSES or what you were expecting from your A-levels but if you were one of those students who could/should have got A*AA/AAA and similar top marks then you could look at sitting the exams in October. Again, this is very much dependent on your situation.

Law is and has been for years a very competitive field. A lot of people seem to forget that its not "am I good enough" the real question is am I within the top 100 candidates of the 3,000 applying here. Similarly am I within the top 12 of the 1,500 candidates applying here (as is the case at some US firms).

When your application is reviewed it will be looked at from every aspect from grades to career commitment. Grades can sometimes be offset by commitment elsewhere but it again goes back to the above point, where there are 3,000 applications will that application be within the top 100. There are numerous ways to improve it past your grades and especially A-levels, maybe if you score 70% in every module from a top university you will have offset the A-levels. Similarly if you get a first from a top university and had 11A* then again you can show your potential.

All of this is very flaky information as I simply do not know if you even want to work at these firms and if you want to go into the corporate law route. Happy to help further if you require.
Thank you very much for taking time and reviewing my situation tbh I do not have dreams of working for a magic circle law firm the amount of stress and lifestyle is completely different as to what I aspire and hopefully at university I will get a 1st or a 2:1 which will hopefully cover up my alevel grades which were given beyond my control
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(Original post by Username123489)
Thank you very much for taking time and reviewing my situation tbh I do not have dreams of working for a magic circle law firm the amount of stress and lifestyle is completely different as to what I aspire and hopefully at university I will get a 1st or a 2:1 which will hopefully cover up my alevel grades which were given beyond my control
No problem. A lot of people when they study law at university end up hating it, what I would say is GET SOME WORK EXPERIENCE!!! The best thing you can do is email local firms and see if they will keep you for a week or two during the holidays. Ring/email/go in (probably after Covid blows over) and see if they will have you.

Most will say no but stick at it and you will get someone who will give you a chance.
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(Original post by JYP17)
No problem. A lot of people when they study law at university end up hating it, what I would say is GET SOME WORK EXPERIENCE!!! The best thing you can do is email local firms and see if they will keep you for a week or two during the holidays. Ring/email/go in (probably after Covid blows over) and see if they will have you.

Most will say no but stick at it and you will get someone who will give you a chance.
Could you check your messages please?
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