Anyone else applying for Modern Languages at Oxford 2021?

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Culver
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Hi!
I can’t seem to find anyone else applying for modern languages at Oxford next year and I’d honestly love someone to share experiences with and make an encouraging group chat or something. I come from a family where no one has gone to university before and none of my friends are applying for modern languages. Please comment down below if you’re applying! ❤️
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04MR17
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(Original post by Culver)
Hi!
I can’t seem to find anyone else applying for modern languages at Oxford next year and I’d honestly love someone to share experiences with and make an encouraging group chat or something. I come from a family where no one has gone to university before and none of my friends are applying for modern languages. Please comment down below if you’re applying! ❤️
I've moved your thread to the Oxford forum now.

Best of luck with your application.
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qwertyuiop1993
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(Original post by Culver)
Hi!
I can’t seem to find anyone else applying for modern languages at Oxford next year and I’d honestly love someone to share experiences with and make an encouraging group chat or something. I come from a family where no one has gone to university before and none of my friends are applying for modern languages. Please comment down below if you’re applying! ❤️
Hey, nice to see some Modern Languages representation around here. What languages are you thinking of applying for? I did my undergrad and masters in French at Oxford and was an interviewer for my college, so if you have any questions about the application process then ask away
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(Original post by qwertyuiop1993)
Hey, nice to see some Modern Languages representation around here. What languages are you thinking of applying for? I did my undergrad and masters in French at Oxford and was an interviewer for my college, so if you have any questions about the application process then ask away
That’s amazing, thank you! I’m actually also applying for French and linguistics, and I think I’m going to apply to LMH. I was wondering if you were tested on speaking or just literature analysis in the interview? Thanks so much
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qwertyuiop1993
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(Original post by Culver)
That’s amazing, thank you! I’m actually also applying for French and linguistics, and I think I’m going to apply to LMH. I was wondering if you were tested on speaking or just literature analysis in the interview? Thanks so much
In the interview there is normally a short chat in the target language. At my college (Trinity) we would talk for a few minutes about a topic usually related to something in your submitted work or personal statement.

It's nothing too difficult and they're just checking what your general fluency is like. I got asked about my work experience in France, my friend got asked about a cellist he mentioned in his submitted essay, another was asked about Camus, whom he'd mentioned in his ps.

I'd say the literature / grammar part are probably more important, just because the course itself doesn't have a strong emphasis on speaking skills until the Year Abroad/4th year and also because people have had vastly different exposure to French speaking countries, so some will naturally be much more confident than others.
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(Original post by qwertyuiop1993)
In the interview there is normally a short chat in the target language. At my college (Trinity) we would talk for a few minutes about a topic usually related to something in your submitted work or personal statement.

It's nothing too difficult and they're just checking what your general fluency is like. I got asked about my work experience in France, my friend got asked about a cellist he mentioned in his submitted essay, another was asked about Camus, whom he'd mentioned in his ps.

I'd say the literature / grammar part are probably more important, just because the course itself doesn't have a strong emphasis on speaking skills until the Year Abroad/4th year and also because people have had vastly different exposure to French speaking countries, so some will naturally be much more confident than others.
Thank you so much, that’s super helpful! I’m actually a bit worried about the speaking as I’ve never had the opportunity to go abroad, let alone to France, simply because I don’t have the money and I was worried this would negatively impact me. Do you think it’s worth throwing in the fact that I haven’t had much exposure in my ps? Thanks so much again.
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qwertyuiop1993
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(Original post by Culver)
Thank you so much, that’s super helpful! I’m actually a bit worried about the speaking as I’ve never had the opportunity to go abroad, let alone to France, simply because I don’t have the money and I was worried this would negatively impact me. Do you think it’s worth throwing in the fact that I haven’t had much exposure in my ps? Thanks so much again.
No, I wouldn't worry about it. They are well aware of these things and as long as you can string vaguely coherent sentences together with an ok accent then I think you've done enough in the speaking department. As the course is so literature-heavy they are pretty concerned about literary analysis and grammar/vocab (so that you can read the books). You don't even have any speaking exams in first year. Obviously it would be good to practise speaking and gain confidence, but if you're short of time I wouldn't necessarily prioritise it.

Best thing right now is to be reading around the subject and brushing up on grammar for the MLAT.
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Culver
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(Original post by qwertyuiop1993)
No, I wouldn't worry about it. They are well aware of these things and as long as you can string vaguely coherent sentences together with an ok accent then I think you've done enough in the speaking department. As the course is so literature-heavy they are pretty concerned about literary analysis and grammar/vocab (so that you can read the books). You don't even have any speaking exams in first year. Obviously it would be good to practise speaking and gain confidence, but if you're short of time I wouldn't necessarily prioritise it.

Best thing right now is to be reading around the subject and brushing up on grammar for the MLAT.
Brilliant, thank you for all your help. It’s much appreciated, especially as I can’t seem to find any Oxford languages applicants on here at all!
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(Original post by Culver)
Brilliant, thank you for all your help. It’s much appreciated, especially as I can’t seem to find any Oxford languages applicants on here at all!
No worries! Haha, yeah unfortunately the number of Modern Languages applicants has gone down pretty drastically over the years. In some sense that's good news for you I guess?

If you have any queries further down the line or need help with submitted work / MLAT questions don't hesitate to ask. I was heavily involved in Access work as a student so I do enjoy mentoring people on the admissions process
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(Original post by Culver)
Thank you so much, that’s super helpful! I’m actually a bit worried about the speaking as I’ve never had the opportunity to go abroad, let alone to France, simply because I don’t have the money and I was worried this would negatively impact me. Do you think it’s worth throwing in the fact that I haven’t had much exposure in my ps? Thanks so much again.
Honestly don't worry about that, I'd been to France on a school trip but I still haven't been to Spain and I'm going into my second year studying at Oxford now! My first real life experience will probably be flat hunting....
In the language part they might ask you if you've ever been, but if you haven't it doesn't matter, they might just ask something like where you'd like to visit if you could
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(Original post by qwertyuiop1993)
Hey, nice to see some Modern Languages representation around here. What languages are you thinking of applying for? I did my undergrad and masters in French at Oxford and was an interviewer for my college, so if you have any questions about the application process then ask away
Classy. Go for it Culver
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(Original post by Oxford Mum)
Classy. Go for it Culver
Thank you!!
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(Original post by Espançais)
Honestly don't worry about that, I'd been to France on a school trip but I still haven't been to Spain and I'm going into my second year studying at Oxford now! My first real life experience will probably be flat hunting....
In the language part they might ask you if you've ever been, but if you haven't it doesn't matter, they might just ask something like where you'd like to visit if you could
Thanks, that’s super helpful. I’m more confident about saying I haven’t been before now
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Thanks, that’s super helpful. I’m more confident about saying I haven’t been before now
No worries! Lots of people haven't - after all, even if people do have foreign holidays with family, they won't necessarily have been to the right country, and school trips aren't always offered/ can be expensive, so it's really not something they expect. I just said I'd like to go to Barcelona bc that was where my teacher was from, first name that popped into my head
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(Original post by Culver)
Thanks, that’s super helpful. I’m more confident about saying I haven’t been before now
It's flair they are looking for, and keenness to read and appreciate literature, rather than visiting Mummy and Daddy's villa in Deauville.

The tutors realise that some students have these advantages and it's not your fault if you don't.

Keep up with the literature, and reflecting on what you have read when you put your book down. Look back at your grammar, for the MLAT (where often the English to the target language sentences are actually built round a grammar point).

Oxford likes you to get the grammar right, and I second that. If you speak and make too many grammatical errors, it doesn't just sound unprofessional, but it distracts the listener from what you are trying to say.

Here's a story... my son went for a German speaking job. It was about cruise booking, which he knows a enormous amount about. He did a "brilliant" interview apparently, but didn't get the job. The interviewer, a Southampton languages graduate, was asking him questions, littered with grammatical errors. Without thinking, son answered back in correct German, so he was unconsciously correcting his own interviewer's mistakes. The interviewer pointed this out in feedback about why he didn't get the job (which suddenly required Spanish as well as German, which he didn't have).

Maybe the interviewer would have preferred my son to flatter him by using the same errors in his reply, I don't know.
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(Original post by Oxford Mum)
It's flair they are looking for, and keenness to read and appreciate literature, rather than visiting Mummy and Daddy's villa in Deauville.

The tutors realise that some students have these advantages and it's not your fault if you don't.

Keep up with the literature, and reflecting on what you have read when you put your book down. Look back at your grammar, for the MLAT (where often the English to the target language sentences are actually built round a grammar point).

Oxford likes you to get the grammar right, and I second that. If you speak and make too many grammatical errors, it doesn't just sound unprofessional, but it distracts the listener from what you are trying to say.

Here's a story... my son went for a German speaking job. It was about cruise booking, which he knows a enormous amount about. He did a "brilliant" interview apparently, but didn't get the job. The interviewer, a Southampton languages graduate, was asking him questions, littered with grammatical errors. Without thinking, son answered back in correct German, so he was unconsciously correcting his own interviewer's mistakes. The interviewer pointed this out in feedback about why he didn't get the job (which suddenly required Spanish as well as German, which he didn't have).

Maybe the interviewer would have preferred my son to flatter him by using the same errors in his reply, I don't know.
😂 This reminds me of my Spanish A level exam. The speaking examiner was new (her first exam session) and she made so many errors! I'm sure I did too, being an A level student, but it wasn't half off-putting! She also didn't ask any deeper or extension questions, which meant I had to work really hard to get the right stuff in for the higher bands
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Prsom, at least you knew what you were doing!
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