Deluge of appeals expected with half of mocks higher than results at some schools

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username5243714
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"The Government’s last-minute change to A-levels and GCSEs is likely to trigger a deluge of appeals and unprecedented difficulties for universities in deciding who to award places and even court challenges.

In some schools, pupils may seek to have nearly a half of A-level results overturned because their mock exam grades were higher, i understands.

However, schools and pupils are still in the dark about how mock appeals will work, with the exam watchdog Ofqual saying details will not be available until next week.

On Tuesday night, the Education Secretary Gavin Williamson announced a “triple lock” – meaning pupils can accept the grades they are awarded on results day, sit a back-up exam in the autumn or appeal to be awarded their mock exam results.

No mocks detail

On Wednesday, Ofqual admitted it did not yet know how the latter would work. “We are working urgently to operationalise this as fairly as possible and to determine what standards of evidence will be required for the appeal,” it said. “We will provide more detail early next week.”


The schools minister Nick Gibb said the new right of appeal would “only apply to a small group of people”.

However, with schools receiving pupils’ results a day in advance, i can reveal that some schools believe they could challenge nearly a half of grades.

A head of sixth form in Hertfordshire – who asked not to be named – told i that 60 per cent of teacher predictions at his school had been downgraded by the exam boards’ moderation process.

‘Steam rollered’ pupils

“The statistical standardisation algorithm has steam rollered over a number of student’s futures,” he said.

But he said that 45 per cent of all grades would be higher if students were awarded their mock results. “Any student who did better in their mock, even a student with an A who had an A* in their mock will appeal,” he added.


A teacher at a school in Yorkshire said that of roughly 400 students, 96 scored higher in their mocks than their results day grade.

An academy leader in Oxfordshire said about a quarter of her students’ mock results were also higher.

Inconsistent tests

Other school leaders reported lower figures, which education experts said reflected inconsistency in how mocks are conducted.

Rachel Johnson, the head of PiXL – a network of over 1,400 secondary schools – told i: “A mock means about 35 different things.”

Schools set them at different times of the year, with varying levels of strictness and covering different content, she said. With schools often setting previous years’ papers, some pupils may have already seen the questions, Ms Johnson added.
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RogerOxon
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This is what happens when politicians try to please everyone. They may as well give all A*s.

I don't believe that there's a demonstrably fair way to decide grades, other than exams. It's not an easy situation, but trying to please everyone doesn't lead to credible grades.
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username5243714
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(Original post by RogerOxon)
This is what happens when politicians try to please everyone. They may as well give all A*s.

I don't believe that there's a demonstrably fair way to decide grades, other than exams. It's not an easy situation, but trying to please everyone doesn't lead to credible grades.
No one is asking for everyone to get A*s. They are asking for as fair grades as possible.
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(Original post by Lightning720)
No one is asking for everyone to get A*s. They are asking for as fair grades as possible.
I don't agree. The problem is that many people would not be happy with fair (i.e. exam) grades. Every year, many students are disastified with their achieved grades. This year, they will find it easier to dispute them.

It's a difficult situation, and I don't see a way to keep the majority happy, short of over-awarding grades.
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