Nadd
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So I just finished my degree in children’s nursing and after all these years of studying as a student I realized now I’m qualified it’s taken a big tol on my mental health and although I enjoy the job I don’t know if it’s what I want to do long term and am thinking about quitting...what shall I do? Am I making a mistake by quoting? Should I give it more time? 😭😭
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L-K
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(Original post by Nadd)
So I just finished my degree in children’s nursing and after all these years of studying as a student I realized now I’m qualified it’s taken a big tol on my mental health and although I enjoy the job I don’t know if it’s what I want to do long term and am thinking about quitting...what shall I do? Am I making a mistake by quoting? Should I give it more time? 😭😭
Only you can answer whether that is the right decision. Do you have a plan for what you might want to do instead?
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Nadd
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(Original post by L-K)
Only you can answer whether that is the right decision. Do you have a plan for what you might want to do instead?
Not really😪 I just feel this job is too much for my mental health, I don’t feel happy, most of my days off I don’t do much because I’m trying to recover from my shifts. I just feel like I want more out of life than do a job that clearly impacts on me this much.
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LeapingLucy
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(Original post by Nadd)
Not really😪 I just feel this job is too much for my mental health, I don’t feel happy, most of my days off I don’t do much because I’m trying to recover from my shifts. I just feel like I want more out of life than do a job that clearly impacts on me this much.
Have you ever considered being a practice nurse at a GP surgery?

The hours are much more friendly and consistent (daytime only & no shifting rotas) and the job is generally less intense than hospital nursing (in my opinion, at least).
Last edited by LeapingLucy; 1 month ago
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Nadd
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(Original post by LeapingLucy)
Have you ever considered being a practice nurse at a GP surgery?

The hours are much more friendly and consistent (daytime only & no shifting rotas) and the job is generally less intense than hospital nursing (in my opinion, at least).
Thanks for taking the time to reply. No I haven’t, but that sounds like something I’d be more interested in. Do you need any extra qualifications to do this? Because I specialise in children’s only.
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LeapingLucy
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(Original post by Nadd)
Thanks for taking the time to reply. No I haven’t, but that sounds like something I’d be more interested in. Do you need any extra qualifications to do this? Because I specialise in children’s only.
There's some information about the process of becoming a practice nurse here - I think you do need some extra training/qualifications, but a child nursing degree is perfectly acceptable.

(I'm not an HCP myself, but I worked as a GP receptionist last summer, so I got some insight into the roles of practice nurses)

https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/exp...practice-nurse
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futurechildnurse
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Hi @nadd,

Have you also considered children's day surgery? Admittedly,still 12 hour shifts but every weekend off.
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Emily_B
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(Original post by Nadd)
So I just finished my degree in children’s nursing and after all these years of studying as a student I realized now I’m qualified it’s taken a big tol on my mental health and although I enjoy the job I don’t know if it’s what I want to do long term and am thinking about quitting...what shall I do? Am I making a mistake by quoting? Should I give it more time? 😭😭
Just for another option, have you looked into school nursing? Or how to get into the courses to become a health visitor? You still have options without having to do hospital shifts, as other posts have proven
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Blackstarr
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Omds i feel the same and i am entering my 2nd year of uni studying childrens nursing.i want to quit and drop out but when i think of how far i have come i think is it worth it. The degree itself is tiring plus the placements.
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Nadd
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(Original post by Blackstarr)
Omds i feel the same and i am entering my 2nd year of uni studying childrens nursing.i want to quit and drop out but when i think of how far i have come i think is it worth it. The degree itself is tiring plus the placements.
Hey!
Trust me a lot of newely qualified nurses I’ve spoken to feel it’s a lot and it’s true it’s a difficult career, especially working in the hospital. On the plus side there’s lots of options if you decide 12 hour shifts are not for you. The leap between being a student and a nurse is massive and I guess I didn’t realize that until I actually qualified. Not to put you off or anything, it’s a very satisfying career and I’m sure there’s lots of pathways I can take, but it’s very intense because your dealing with someone’s health and well-being. I felt the same as you when I was a student and I never quit because I thought **** I’ve come so far, but if you feel it’s not for you then there’s nothing wrong with leaving the course or even taking time out. But you’ve got one more year left, I suppose it’s A harder decision when you’ve done majority of the course.
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Nadd
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(Original post by Emily_B)
Just for another option, have you looked into school nursing? Or how to get into the courses to become a health visitor? You still have options without having to do hospital shifts, as other posts have proven
Hi,
Thanks for the reply. I have thought about school nursing briefly but I think I’m more interested in working in a surgery or something similar. I think I defo need to explore my options because tbh I don’t know what else is out there. Any other suggestions?
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Nadd
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(Original post by futurechildnurse)
Hi @nadd,

Have you also considered children's day surgery? Admittedly,still 12 hour shifts but every weekend off.
Hi!
I think at the moment I just want to get away from the hospital environment and 12 hour shifts, so I don’t think day surgery is a good idea for me I wouldn’t mike if it was a 9-5 job but of course it’s not .
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Nadd
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(Original post by LeapingLucy)
There's some information about the process of becoming a practice nurse here - I think you do need some extra training/qualifications, but a child nursing degree is perfectly acceptable.

(I'm not an HCP myself, but I worked as a GP receptionist last summer, so I got some insight into the roles of practice nurses)

https://www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/exp...practice-nurse
Thank you so much! I will definitely look into it. Just out of curiosity we’re the practice nurses dealing with both adult and children’s?
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LeapingLucy
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(Original post by Nadd)
Thank you so much! I will definitely look into it. Just out of curiosity we’re the practice nurses dealing with both adult and children’s?
Yes.

At the surgery, I worked at, the nurses were responsible for things like:
- Newborn & child immunisations
- Travel vaccinations
- Smear tests
- Cleaning & bandaging minor wounds/ulcers (mostly older people but a few children)
- Ear syringing (adults & children)
- ECGs
- Annual routine asthma check ups

Additionally, some of the nurses also did annual check ups for people with other chronic illnesses, including:
- Diabetes (involving checking blood results, talking with the patient about lifestyle etc)
- Coronary heart disease
- and others that I can’t remember!

There were also Minor Illness nurses who had additional qualifications, and could thus:
- See & diagnose patients with coughs/colds and minor skin complaints (e.g. impetigo)
- Had some prescribing rights
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LeapingLucy
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Oh, and also contraception!

A few of the nurses had a qualification in contraception, so patients could book a phone call with them to discuss different contraceptive options.
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Blackstarr
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(Original post by LeapingLucy)
Yes.

At the surgery, I worked at, the nurses were responsible for things like:
- Newborn & child immunisations
- Travel vaccinations
- Smear tests
- Cleaning & bandaging minor wounds/ulcers (mostly older people but a few children)
- Ear syringing (adults & children)
- ECGs
- Annual routine asthma check ups

Additionally, some of the nurses also did annual check ups for people with other chronic illnesses, including:
- Diabetes (involving checking blood results, talking with the patient about lifestyle etc)
- Coronary heart disease
- and others that I can’t remember!

There were also Minor Illness nurses who had additional qualifications, and could thus:
- See & diagnose patients with coughs/colds and minor skin complaints (e.g. impetigo)
- Had some prescribing rights
Isin't that for adult nurses or childrens nurses can do that cuz i don't think childrens nurses do stuff like ulcers but correct me if i am wrong
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LeapingLucy
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(Original post by Blackstarr)
Isin't that for adult nurses or childrens nurses can do that cuz i don't think childrens nurses do stuff like ulcers but correct me if i am wrong
In primary care (GP surgeries), they don’t have separate nurses for adults and children.

You will need to undergo additional training to become a practice nurse, learning to deal with the things that you didn’t do in hospitals (e.g. ulcers), but a child nursing degree is accepted as a starting point, just the same as an adult nursing degree.
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xxcazaxx
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Speaking as someone who has been a paeds nurse for a long time,I can say that it is stressful to start with but that the more you gain in confidence, the easier it gets. That said, no job is worth your health. Is there someone at work you could speak to about how you are feeling (even occupational health)?Have you thought about a respite unit for kids with special needs, think this would be a nice job as you really get to know the kids you are looking after and the kid often love going to these places.
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