Rkam
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what happens when white light passes through a single slit than a double slit, are all the fringes the same width?
what about if white light just passes through a double slit, are the width of the fringes the same?

The same question but if monochromatic light went through a single slit and then a double slit and just a single slit?
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LuigiMario
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You should watch some good you-tube descriptions involving lasers & slits

Originally, the Nobel prize winning (un-modest) famous physicist Richard Feynman stated that the double-slit experiment “…has in it the heart of quantum mechanics. In reality, it contains the only mystery” and that “nobody can give you a deeper explanation of this phenomenon than I have given; that is, a description of it” [Feynman R, Leighton R, Sands M (1965) The Feynman Lectures on Physics]

Keep looking, YT, then Feynman....
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Kallisto
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(Original post by Rkam)
what happens when white light passes through a single slit than a double slit, are all the fringes the same width?
what about if white light just passes through a double slit, are the width of the fringes the same?

The same question but if monochromatic light went through a single slit and then a double slit and just a single slit?
A white light that passes through a single slit first gets diffracted and interfered, but remains as white light. But when it passes through a double slit after that the light is divided (refracted) in different spectra of the light (monochromatic lights have different refraction index and thus different diffraction angles). It also causes interference of the electromagnetic waves, the maxima and minima (fringes). The width of the fringes depends on the frequency of the electromagnetic wave of the light, that is to say that the different monochromatic lights have different witdths of fringes.

When a white light passes through a double slit only, it has the same effect: it comes to refraction, diffraction and interference into different spectra.

When a monochromatic light gets through a single and double slit, it will remain as monochromatic light: it is a spectre that can't be refracted, but the fringe is different as explained above. In both a single and double slit the monochromatic light is diffracted and interfered.
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Rkam
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(Original post by Kallisto)
A white light that passes through a single slit first gets diffracted and interfered, but remains as white light. But when it passes through a double slit after that the light is divided (refracted) in different spectra of the light (monochromatic lights have different refraction index and thus different diffraction angles). It also causes interference of the electromagnetic waves, the maxima and minima (fringes). The width of the fringes depends on the frequency of the electromagnetic wave of the light, that is to say that the different monochromatic lights have different witdths of fringes.

When a white light passes through a double slit only, it has the same effect: it comes to refraction, diffraction and interference into different spectra.

When a monochromatic light gets through a single and double slit, it will remain as monochromatic light: it is a spectre that can't be refracted, but the fringe is different as explained above. In both a single and double slit the monochromatic light is diffracted and interfered.
so with white light through a single slit and then double slit with there be a white maxima and then other alternating maximas with violet closest to the central maxima and red furthest away and this is the same if the white light just went through a double slit?
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Kallisto
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(Original post by Rkam)
so with white light through a single slit and then double slit with there be a white maxima and then other alternating maximas with violet closest to the central maxima and red furthest away and this is the same if the white light just went through a double slit?
Yep.

White light through a double slit shows white maxima and if the white light pass through a double slit after that (or just a double slit) different maxima in different colors are shown. The violet lights are the closest to the central maxima, the white light. And the red ones are furthest.
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