More or less companies providing sponsorship in the UK after Brexit?

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Poll: More or less companies providing sponsorship in the UK after Brexit?
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apple7171
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Hi! So as we all know after 2020 UK companies will have to provide a sponsorship to employ workers from both the EU and anywhere else outside. This was not the case for EU people previously. So has the total number of companies that provide a scholarship increased or does it plan to increase after 2020 ends or will it stay more or less the same?
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ByEeek
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Who knows. At present companies can recruit none from the EU. After December that poor will diminish substantially. I imagine that in the first instance companies will try to recruit from the UK or manage without. They may also look to train employees on the job and failing All of that go through the minefield of red tape that involves getting work visas and sponsorship. No doubt third party solicitors will turn up on mass to fast track the process for companies.
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History98
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The list of companies that can sponsor work visas has grown from 29752 in January 2016 to 31381 in August 2020. This is a growth rate of 5% (cumulative over the 4.5 or so years). All the big organisations like the NHS, universities, banks etc. have always been on the list and are the key players in non-EU employment. Note though that the size of the list is not neccesarily directly coorelated to the number of sponserships. In 2016, for instance, only around 6000 students switched to Tier 2 work visas despite there being 30000 sponsers.

In general, the work visa route is quite restrictive although it's due to loosen up slightly starting in January 2021 due to the government

i) stopping the annual increases in the minimum salary threshold for skilled worker settlement applications and keeping the minimum at it's current level of £35000,

ii) removing the cap on work visa numbers,

ii) re-introducing the post-study work (PSW) visa (before it was scrapped in 2012, around 60K non-EU students moved onto the PSW work visa),

iv) removing the resident labour market labour test (RLMT) which currently mandates employers to explicitly prove that there are no UK/EU workers available to do a job before offering the job to a non-EU national. Although the priniciple of offering jobs to UK/EU workers first remains, employers will not be forced to conduct RLMT test to prove they followed the principle. Employers will still need the pay the non-EU worker the higher of i) £25600 or ii) 90% of the going rate for the profession.

v) allowing workers without a degree level education to also be considered as skilled workers.

The key issue that EU workers coming after the transition period will face is the issue that non-EU workers currently face which is the exorbitant cost of actually moving to the UK on skilled worker routes. If you were to ask a person on the street how much they think it would cost to facilitate a complete move of a family of 5 non-EU nationals moving to the UK (i.e work visas, settlement applications and citizenship applications) they would probably guess a few thousand pounds but they would be way off. A move like this would actually cost over £35K in direct home office costs (approx 85% paid by the worker and 15% paid by the employer). This figure will increase to around £40K starting next month as the health surcharge is due to increase by £200 per person per year.
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apple7171
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(Original post by History98)
The list of companies that can sponsor work visas has grown from 29752 in January 2016 to 31381 in August 2020. This is a growth rate of 5% (cumulative over the 4.5 or so years). All the big organisations like the NHS, universities, banks etc. have always been on the list and are the key players in non-EU employment. Note though that the size of the list is not neccesarily directly coorelated to the number of sponserships. In 2016, for instance, only around 6000 students switched to Tier 2 work visas despite there being 30000 sponsers.

In general, the work visa route is quite restrictive although it's due to loosen up slightly starting in January 2021 due to the government

i) stopping the annual increases in the minimum salary threshold for skilled worker settlement applications and keeping the minimum at it's current level of £35000,

ii) removing the cap on work visa numbers,

ii) re-introducing the post-study work (PSW) visa (before it was scrapped in 2012, around 60K non-EU students moved onto the PSW work visa),

iv) removing the resident labour market labour test (RLMT) which currently mandates employers to explicitly prove that there are no UK/EU workers available to do a job before offering the job to a non-EU national. Although the priniciple of offering jobs to UK/EU workers first remains, employers will not be forced to conduct RLMT test to prove they followed the principle. Employers will still need the pay the non-EU worker the higher of i) £25600 or ii) 90% of the going rate for the profession.

v) allowing workers without a degree level education to also be considered as skilled workers.

The key issue that EU workers coming after the transition period will face is the issue that non-EU workers currently face which is the exorbitant cost of actually moving to the UK on skilled worker routes. If you were to ask a person on the street how much they think it would cost to facilitate a complete move of a family of 5 non-EU nationals moving to the UK (i.e work visas, settlement applications and citizenship applications) they would probably guess a few thousand pounds but they would be way off. A move like this would actually cost over £35K in direct home office costs (approx 85% paid by the worker and 15% paid by the employer). This figure will increase to around £40K starting next month as the health surcharge is due to increase by £200 per person per year.
Thank you for your answer. The government is also planning to introduce the point system right? Is there anything you know about that?
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History98
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(Original post by apple7171)
Thank you for your answer. The government is also planning to introduce the point system right? Is there anything you know about that?
The changes I have listed are the changes that will come with the new point based system. The new points based system just slightly loosens some requirements in the current scheme. Overall, the new points based system will be slightly easier than the non-EU scheme we have now but not by much.
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