Do you think boris should add calories to menus

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parmezanne
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#21
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there are good arguments here for pro and con - i'm in the middle.

i don't think it's the best way of dealing with the obesity problem.
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V℮rsions
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Yes, it's good for those who are focusing on losing weight or being more healthy. I wouldn't really care about it personally but it's a good idea for those who do - and more transparency for restaurants. And I know about the eating disorder controversy, but it's a real tough decision, and in this case (I'm sorry to put it this way, but it's how it is) it's a loud minority in the debate. Places like Mcdonalds show their calories on the boxes, and I don't hear many complaints about that.
I don't think there's a good way I could have phrased that - I'm not trying to offend or be rude.
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OxMus
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I think it’s embarrassing that it’s taken a generation-defining pandemic for the government to pretend to care about public health.

Adding calorie information to menus is a pathetically inadequate measure — there’s so much more to what you eat than how many calories it has. More perniciously, making calorie information ubiquitous in public places is dangerous for people with EDs and for people vulnerable to developing them.
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Carbon Dioxide
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(Original post by Shenotalright)
In London ?
Maybe (it's been some time, but I've definitely seen them over here in Cornwall - I don't think I've actually used dine-in since my ill-fated Oxford interview in December, but I think they were being displayed on the electronic screens there as well...)
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ROTL94
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No. Lots of people with eating disorders count calories and if they're trying to knock that on the head having them on the menu at an eatery wouldn't be very productive at all. In fact even if they're not trying to knock that on the head it's still not helpful to reinforce it
Last edited by ROTL94; 1 month ago
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Anonymous #2
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(Original post by 2_versions)
Yes, it's good for those who are focusing on losing weight or being more healthy. I wouldn't really care about it personally but it's a good idea for those who do - and more transparency for restaurants. And I know about the eating disorder controversy, but it's a real tough decision, and in this case (I'm sorry to put it this way, but it's how it is) it's a loud minority in the debate. Places like Mcdonalds show their calories on the boxes, and I don't hear many complaints about that.
I don't think there's a good way I could have phrased that - I'm not trying to offend or be rude.
with the utmost respect to your opinion, sadly i don't think it is a 'loud minority.' It was only a couple of months back in lockdown where a show titled 'The Restaurant That Burns Calories' (which displayed calorie intakes of dishes and how much exercise would burn that off) resulted in BEAT, the UK Eating Disorder Charity, having to extend their contact hours for support due to the distress caused. That was the impact on one charity, from ONE show. Imagine the strain on mental health services, charities & resources if that sort of information is EVERYWHERE, every single day.

I work as a mental health nurse. I see the the relationship of mental health on eating habits every day, not least the impact of diet culture and the pressure to be perfect. It might be a small minority to those detached from it, but for the 1 in 4 struggling with mental health... this will be catastrophic. Because its not just those with Eating Disorders who will be impacted, it will be those with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder who struggle with Contamination OCD of what goes into their body, it will be those with Anxiety Disorders who struggle in social environments as it is... not least with the newfound anxiety of being judged for their choice and the calorie content of it, it will be those with Personality Disorders who have co-morbid Eating Disorders (as there's a link between them), the list could go on...

(Places like McDonalds often display their calories on the back or the side of boxes, individuals in ED recovery can actively choose to avoid viewing this to avoid being triggered... this will not be the case if its printed on the front of every menu.)

As a nurse, of course I champion public health, but not at the detriment of other conditions. Mental Health is just as important as Physical Health. Have the option to view a menu detailing calorie information if an individual should choose to view it, yes. But have it everywhere? Hm.
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barnetlad
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Whilst you may legitimately argue that it is giving customers information, I doubt it would be accurate for other than pre-prepared fast food. I think that there are other ways that should be tried to tackle obesity. The government has scored an own goal by including fast food in the Eat Out to Help Out scheme.
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Sabertooth
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(Original post by bambi1425)
no, it's not considerate to those already recovering or suffering with disordered eating
What about people who are overweight?
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khadijaaaxxxx
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yeah i think that would be great
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bambi1425
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(Original post by Sabertooth)
What about people who are overweight?
I also said more emphasis on healthy lifestyle and a balanced diet not just calories may be more beneficial. I also said an optional menu with calories could be offered by some places
Last edited by bambi1425; 1 month ago
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Sabertooth
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(Original post by Anonymous)
with the utmost respect to your opinion, sadly i don't think it is a 'loud minority.' It was only a couple of months back in lockdown where a show titled 'The Restaurant That Burns Calories' (which displayed calorie intakes of dishes and how much exercise would burn that off) resulted in BEAT, the UK Eating Disorder Charity, having to extend their contact hours for support due to the distress caused. That was the impact on one charity, from ONE show. Imagine the strain on mental health services, charities & resources if that sort of information is EVERYWHERE, every single day.

I work as a mental health nurse. I see the the relationship of mental health on eating habits every day, not least the impact of diet culture and the pressure to be perfect. It might be a small minority to those detached from it, but for the 1 in 4 struggling with mental health... this will be catastrophic. Because its not just those with Eating Disorders who will be impacted, it will be those with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder who struggle with Contamination OCD of what goes into their body, it will be those with Anxiety Disorders who struggle in social environments as it is... not least with the newfound anxiety of being judged for their choice and the calorie content of it, it will be those with Personality Disorders who have co-morbid Eating Disorders (as there's a link between them), the list could go on...

(Places like McDonalds often display their calories on the back or the side of boxes, individuals in ED recovery can actively choose to avoid viewing this to avoid being triggered... this will not be the case if its printed on the front of every menu.)

As a nurse, of course I champion public health, but not at the detriment of other conditions. Mental Health is just as important as Physical Health. Have the option to view a menu detailing calorie information if an individual should choose to view it, yes. But have it everywhere? Hm.
(Original post by OxMus)
I think it’s embarrassing that it’s taken a generation-defining pandemic for the government to pretend to care about public health.

Adding calorie information to menus is a pathetically inadequate measure — there’s so much more to what you eat than how many calories it has. More perniciously, making calorie information ubiquitous in public places is dangerous for people with EDs and for people vulnerable to developing them.
What about people who are overweight?
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Anonymous #2
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(Original post by Sabertooth)
What about people who are overweight?
Menus detailing calorie information should be available at request, that way those who require it may receive this information without readily triggering those who do not wish to see it.
Nobody’s saying not to have calorie information available (I fundamentally agree with it)... a lot of us in the mental health field are just saying there needs to be a certain amount of responsibility & thought with regards to HOW it is displayed/accessed.
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Sabertooth
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Menus detailing calorie information should be available at request, that way those who require it may receive this information without readily triggering those who do not wish to see it.
Nobody’s saying not to have calorie information available (I fundamentally agree with it)... a lot of us in the mental health field are just saying there needs to be a certain amount of responsibility & thought with regards to HOW it is displayed/accessed.
It seems like you have a favored group and an unfavored group and you're kowtowing to the former.
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Anonymous #3
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Even if this comes into force it will be something like:
"Restaurants will have to provide a menu with calories upon request."
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Carbon Dioxide
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Almost all food sold in British supermarkets contain nutritional information which - among other metrics - shows how many calories are in 100g of that food. Most food also contains "traffic light" labelling which shows the level of fat, saturates, salt, sugar and calories in each serving of that food. In England, about 35% of adults are overweight and another 30% are obese (using WHO definitions) - figures that the Prime Minister has cited in his drive to cut obesity and get more people physically active.

Speaking purely in relation to the proposal to require restaurants to include calorie counts on menus: Are the physical needs of Britain's 20 million obese people trumped by the emotional needs of what Anonymous #2 refers to as "the 1 in 4 struggling with mental health" (some of whom may also be obese, and not all of whom may necessarily have a problem with this proposal)? And what makes this any different, or any more offensive, to the current practice of including calorie counts on food sold in supermarkets?
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Anonymous #3
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Menus detailing calorie information should be available at request, that way those who require it may receive this information without readily triggering those who do not wish to see it.
Nobody’s saying not to have calorie information available (I fundamentally agree with it)... a lot of us in the mental health field are just saying there needs to be a certain amount of responsibility & thought with regards to HOW it is displayed/accessed.
Wait. So there is an issue right now with putting the calorie count on food packaging?
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TheWannabeFarmer
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(Original post by Carbon Dioxide)
Agreed. Note that McDonald's already put calorie counts on their menus - I know this because I can just about survive eating a Big Mac, fries and nine McNuggets (~1,250kcal) without feeling... bloated :P
Hopefully once there are more alternatives to compare the figures to restaurants will strive to improve themselves
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Anonymous #2
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(Original post by Sabertooth)
It seems like you have a favored group and an unfavored group and you're kowtowing to the former.
I am merely opening up discourse about the impact of this on mental health.
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OxMus
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(Original post by Sabertooth)
What about people who are overweight?
Exactly – what about them? As I’ve pointed out, the measures are inadequate for properly dealing with obesity on a national level.
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Shenotalright
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#40
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(Original post by OxMus)
Exactly – what about them? As I’ve pointed out, the measures are inadequate for properly dealing with obesity on a national level.
Boris can deal with that lmaoo. Who knows what he has in mind. Perhaps have two sets of menus? One with the calories and one without?
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