User491
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I’m off to study law after receiving an unfair result of abc. I’m wondering if people think results for this year will be taken into special consideration By employers ? Or if I could explain my grades with mitigating circumstances?
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RogerOxon
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(Original post by User491)
I’m off to study law after receiving an unfair result of abc. I’m wondering if people think results for this year will be taken into special consideration By employers ? Or if I could explain my grades with mitigating circumstances?
How do you know that they're unfair?
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cherryxberry
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If your not happy with your grades why not try appealing?
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liverninthered
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Your A levels hardly make any difference to your life the moment you finish sixth form. Employers spend an average if 6 seconds looking at CVs, if they even bother to look at pre-university qualifications they probably won't care.
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Euphoria101
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(Original post by liverninthered)
Your A levels hardly make any difference to your life the moment you finish sixth form. Employers spend an average if 6 seconds looking at CVs, if they even bother to look at pre-university qualifications they probably won't care.
Not true unfortunately for law. Many firms/chambers have A-Level requirements.
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RV3112
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(Original post by User491)
I’m off to study law after receiving an unfair result of abc. I’m wondering if people think results for this year will be taken into special consideration By employers ? Or if I could explain my grades with mitigating circumstances?
There are a number of other threads dealing with the same question.


In short, no one can answer with certainty.

If a firm has a minimum A-level requirement, I don't expect them to change their standards for this year's cohort as the grade distribution was similar to previous years. I also don't expect recruiters to try and determine whose grades were unfair and whose were not. Students who believe their results were unfair can either appeal or actually sit the exams in October to rectify the situation. What "mitigating circumstances" would you have?
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User491
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(Original post by RogerOxon)
How do you know that they're unfair?
My predictions for uni were A* A* A, my teachers put me in for AAB which I didn’t mind however it got standardised to abc which I cannot appeal as I wasn’t in For the mock that we had in December. My art a level didn’t consist of any mocks so I also have no basis to appeal on.
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User491
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(Original post by cherryxberry)
If your not happy with your grades why not try appealing?
I’m not able to as I wasn’t in for my mock, as I was ill and for my art we didn’t have any mocks in general so I have no route of appeal
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User491
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(Original post by RV3112)
There are a number of other threads dealing with the same question.


In short, no one can answer with certainty.

If a firm has a minimum A-level requirement, I don't expect them to change their standards for this year's cohort as the grade distribution was similar to previous years. I also don't expect recruiters to try and determine whose grades were unfair and whose were not. Students who believe their results were unfair can either appeal or actually sit the exams in October to rectify the situation. What "mitigating circumstances" would you have?
The whole situation is a mitigating circumstance. I have been given a B from a subject I got continuous As in and I’m unable to appeal as we didn’t have a mock. Same goes for my other subject In which I never got below a B grade and ended up with a C, so I have proof that I would have performed better under normal circumstances.
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Arisapo
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(Original post by User491)
The whole situation is a mitigating circumstance. I have been given a B from a subject I got continuous As in and I’m unable to appeal as we didn’t have a mock. Same goes for my other subject In which I never got below a B grade and ended up with a C, so I have proof that I would have performed better under normal circumstances.
Why don’t you resit your exams? Getting into top firms with ABC may be difficult, and even though circumstances are very different, they won’t be viewed as mitigating because anyone could say “I could have got A*AA if I sat them.”

Where do you hold a place?
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RV3112
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(Original post by User491)
The whole situation is a mitigating circumstance. I have been given a B from a subject I got continuous As in and I’m unable to appeal as we didn’t have a mock. Same goes for my other subject In which I never got below a B grade and ended up with a C, so I have proof that I would have performed better under normal circumstances.
Sorry but that's not a mitigating circumstance. That is an argument that you believe your grades are unfair/inaccurate. You will (hopefully) have an opportunity in October to demonstrate your actual capability. Firms will likely expect you to take that opportunity this rather than argue three years later that your grades were not accurate.


Please don't think I'm unsympathetic. I realise how difficult this year has been for students. However, firms are just not likely to accept, or try to judge the validity of these arguments.
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User491
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(Original post by RV3112)
Sorry but that's not a mitigating circumstance. That is an argument that you believe your grades are unfair/inaccurate. You will (hopefully) have an opportunity in October to demonstrate your actual capability. Firms will likely expect you to take that opportunity this rather than argue three years later that your grades were not accurate.


Please don't think I'm unsympathetic. I realise how difficult this year has been for students. However, firms are just not likely to accept, or try to judge the validity of these arguments.
You’re just being realistic. I really want to re sit my exam however my uni is 6 hours away from where I live and I would miss out on the introduction and would fall behind as I wouldn’t be able to keep up with law, revision and teaching myself half of the course that we didn’t manage to cover 😩 I’m just so stuck. Thanks for your help tho.
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RV3112
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(Original post by User491)
You’re just being realistic. I really want to re sit my exam however my uni is 6 hours away from where I live and I would miss out on the introduction and would fall behind as I wouldn’t be able to keep up with law, revision and teaching myself half of the course that we didn’t manage to cover 😩 I’m just so stuck. Thanks for your help tho.
It may not be as difficult as you think (the law side at least).


I know at my uni, our plans are for all introductions and lectures to be recorded and will be available online. We are also preparing for online versions of tutorials. It may be something to discuss with your uni, as it is anticipated that some students will opt to resit A-levels. The first few weeks of content really isn't that intense and you should be able to catch up quite easily within a few weeks. It will be an intense few months, but it will be worth it in the end.

Hopefully others can help advise about the A-Level revision difficulties.
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harrysbar
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(Original post by User491)
You’re just being realistic. I really want to re sit my exam however my uni is 6 hours away from where I live and I would miss out on the introduction and would fall behind as I wouldn’t be able to keep up with law, revision and teaching myself half of the course that we didn’t manage to cover 😩 I’m just so stuck. Thanks for your help tho.
People who are resitting in October are generally taking a year out to do so and asking their uni if they will give them a deferred offer for 2021.

ABC are not bad grades at all but if you think you will always feel they don't reflect your true ability (and yes many law firms do look at A level grades but you could target your applications carefully if you decide not to resit) then it would be better to resit than to think you will be able to claim mitigating circumstances in future. That is highly unlikely as employers are just as likely to take the view that this years cohort got more chances to get good grades than other cohorts with the triple lock safety net. I know that in reality not all students are helped by this safety net but you do have the option of taking your exams in October without it being considered a resit.
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Arisapo
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(Original post by User491)
You’re just being realistic. I really want to re sit my exam however my uni is 6 hours away from where I live and I would miss out on the introduction and would fall behind as I wouldn’t be able to keep up with law, revision and teaching myself half of the course that we didn’t manage to cover 😩 I’m just so stuck. Thanks for your help tho.
Honestly, I wouldn’t advise trying to sit A-Levels and balance uni life at the same time. As you say, that’s far too difficult when you’re trying to settle into uni life, and do well in your exams. One or both will be compromised.

Why not take a year out and sit them in October? It may not be the ideal situation, but you get a chance to have grades which better reflect your abilities, and open more doors. A year may seem like a long time in the circumstances, but it’ll really fly by.
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?Hannah?
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i would personally recommend either appealing based upon mitigating circumstances or taking the year out to resit. technically, if you wish to achieve AAB then you will only have to resit the exams for the subject that you received a C in. definitely enough time to boost the grade to an A from now to october x
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