Cambridge Demystified - Psychological and Behaviourial Sciences (PBS)

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Thank you Oxford Mum for allowing me to join the lovely Cambridge Demystified!

Introduction

I am an international student from Southeast Asia, and I hold an offer for PBS. I take my region’s local public exam so it’s very different from A-levels/IB. I studied in a high-performing state school, but as applying to Oxbridge was not popular in my school, school support during my Cambridge application journey was scarce.


1. Why did you want to study your subject?

I mean, admit it. Deep down, you want to know what everyone else is thinking. You can probably say that my interest in Psychology started as being nosy. Especially teenagers, who are starting to become quite self-conscious and always care about what other people think of them. It’s hard to pinpoint the exact moment that made me like Psychology, and such a moment doesn’t really exist, so I think it’s more like a gradual process. I reckon I had the fascination with ‘mind-reading’ (especially after reading about a certain Edward), and it slowly morphed into a general interest in people’s emotions, behaviour and thoughts. I found myself always asking ‘Why would he/she/they do that?’ Outside the individual level, on a social/global level, I also find things like Game Theory very interesting, especially in messy times like this.


2. Why Cambridge?

I chose to study Psychology in the UK because the foundation and development of Psychology are much better in western countries. Research volume is much higher and there are more opportunities and choices, not matter during study or for my future career. Cambridge naturally became my top choice, as it is one of the best universities not only in the UK, but also in the world. The prospect of studying and mixing with some of the top students all over the world is highly attractive. I also find the flexibility of PBS tripos at Cambridge particularly appealing, as it allows me to explore a range of topics (and even take papers in other courses!). I have mentally prepared myself that it is going to be (pretty) hard, but we improve through challenges.


3. Did any of your teachers inspire you? Or any other experts (TV presenter etc)

Not really. Psychology isn’t in the public exam curriculum, so I wasn’t directly introduced to Psychology through my school, or my teachers. My interest just stemmed from personal experience.


4. Which resources did you use (please name as many as possible) Which books/journals did you read? Which did you like best, and why? What did they teach you?

My resources were mainly outside of school because as I mentioned above, applying to Oxbridge was not popular in my school and teachers knew very little about it. TSR was a useful source of information, for sure. Checking the threads daily became a habit and I was happy to read about other applicants’ progress and also official representatives’ (e.g. Peterhouse Admissions) response to queries.
At the same time, I was fortunate enough to be selected to join a one-to-one mentorship programme (something similar to Zero Gravity in the UK). I was matched with a student also studying PBS at Cambridge, and she offered me a lot of advice, ranging from Personal Statement crafting to ‘insider information’ about colleges to doing mock interviews with me.
Apart from the mentorship programme, I read a lot of books myself. I started with ‘Thinking, Fast and Slow’ for cognitive psychology and some statistics, as well as ‘The Man Who Mistook His Wife For A Hat’ for a more biological/neuroscience perspective (highly recommend these classics). Reading widely was extremely important, as everything could potentially be useful. Another good starting point would be your Director of Studies’ (DoS) area of interest. I got an idea of my DoS’ area of interest from Cambridge’s website, then read some relevant books. Just to clarify, this is different from stalking. I did not memorize my DoS’ research papers and comb through them meticulously; I just had a look to get some direction on the preparation I was about to do.


5. Did you attend any lectures, or take part in any competitions? If so, would you recommend them, and why?

I attended two courses related to Psychology organized by local universities. One was on criminal psychology and the other on abnormal psychology. It was a great introduction to Psychology and further fuelled my interest in the subject. I would definitely recommend such courses as a) it’s a great way to let you know if you enjoy the subject b) it’s definitely something worth putting down in your personal statement to demonstrate your passion towards the subject.


6. Did you have any work experience? If so, how did you find it?

I had zero work experience.


7. What did you mention in your personal statement and why?

The general flow was like this: In the introduction, I mentioned that I was interested in Psychology, citing different people’s reaction to different situations (e.g. the development of mental illnesses) as an example. Therefore I did some volunteering with a hospital, which allowed me to interact with elderly with mental illnesses. After such an experience I was fascinated by the academic theories behind those phenomena (e.g. having mental illnesses), so I joined two courses on Psychology (the aforementioned in Q5) and briefly elaborated the parts I enjoyed the most. I also briefly mentioned how my hobbies and subject choices for the public exam could equip me with the essential skills and knowledge required for the study of Psychology. I then had a general ending and once again expressed my interest in studying Psychology at the world-renowned institutions.
My personal statement was mostly linked by the experiences I had so the flow was pretty smooth. Though I read quite a lot, I didn’t mention any books as I was not very confident in answering questions about them.
My way of writing was by no means the only way to write a personal statement, so it’s just for your reference.


8. Which techniques did you use for the entrance test?

I had to take the PBSAA, which consisted of 2 papers. Paper 1 had 21 MCQ on logical and critical thinking, plus candidates could choose between answering 30 MCQ on Math and Biology (no calculators allowed) or MCQ on English comprehension. I chose the Math and Biology part since English was not my native language, so I had a slight disadvantage for the English part. For the logical and critical thinking MCQ I did a lot of past papers. I finished all past PBSAA papers, and then also the Oxford assessment papers (the logical and critical thinking questions were extremely similar in type). For the Math and Biology part, I also revised all the contents in the public exam curriculum and did a lot of MCQ practices.
As for Paper 2, I had to write an essay. I had to choose 1 statement out of 4 (usually a quote from a famous person) and discuss it. There were no requirements on the scope of discussion, but I tried to approach it from a Psychology perspective (utilizing what I had read). I wrote a lot of essays before the test and my mentor went through them for me.


9. How did you choose your college? Did you go to an open day and if so, did it help you to decide?

I attended the 2019 Cambridge July Open Days. I flew over to the UK and I would recommend prospective international students do the same, since there were so much more you could see/feel/experience in person (if financially viable). Actually before I applied I was not even aware of my college’s existence. I basically walked past my college, found it to be very pretty, stumbled inside, chatted with the admissions tutor, walked around a bit, and decided I liked it a lot. The Open Days was an amazing experience. I also got a real feel of things, like I originally thought Homerton was not that far away from the city centre, but my view had a 180 degree change when I walked for 40 minutes from Newnham to Homerton on an extremely hot day.


10. How did you find the interview process? (NO INTERVIEW QUESTIONS PLEASE – this is against TSR guidelines)

I had 2 interviews, the first one with the Sciences admission tutor and the second one with my college’s PBS DoS. I had the first one before lunch and the second one right after lunch. The first one went pretty well and it’s rather chill. The whole discussion revolved around my personal statement and it wasn’t academic at all. The interviewer just wanted to know about my passion for PBS and how I handled my life. Plus he was super friendly, so I wasn’t intimidated. The second one was considerably more challenging. It was extremely academic and very Psychology-specific. I had to do pre-reading beforehand (30 minutes before my second interview) and it was an abstract of a research paper. I understood only 60%-70% of what was going on in the research and stumbled quite a bit when asked about the research. I also had to draw graphs in front of the interviewer, so you should definitely brush up on your statistics. The interviewer discussed the research paper with me for a very long time – at least half of the total interview time. The second interview question was more common sense and only required some basic knowledge on scientific experiments. The last one was about a specific Psychology topic. I was fortunate enough to have read about that topic before and have seen relevant materials, so I was able to answer all question related to that topic. Overall speaking, I found the first interview much easier than the second, but the second one was still manageable.


11. Any interview tips?

Sorry for being vague in Q10, but in general, you would expect to be asked about scientific research, come across empirical data, and be requested to draw graphs. It will be nice to be armed with a pen and pieces of blank paper for writing/drawing anything required. (Your interviewer will most likely provide you with the necessary stationery, but bringing those stuff will show that you are prepared.) ‘Thinking out loud’ is also a good approach because a) it allows your interviewer to understand your thought process and provide further guidance b) you can clear your thoughts. Also you’ll inevitably be nervous but do remember that everyone else is nervous too, so it’s alright. Actually, try not to focus on the fact that it’s an important interview, but think of it as a wonderful opportunity to discuss your passion with a leading expert in the field. It is truly an extremely valuable and rewarding experience.


12. Did you socialize during interview week? If so, what did you do?

Not a lot. There was only one other girl in my school applying to Cambridge and we weren’t close, plus she was applying for another subject, so we didn’t really communicate. My interview was pretty late (16/12), and the last day for interview was 18/12, so I didn’t see lots applicants as well. I did make friends with another girl applying for Natural Sciences at the same college, and we had dinner and lunch together. It was nice to talk to another applicant but we didn’t share a lot about interviews. We mainly did some chitchat to take our minds off the nerve-wrecking stuff.


13. How did you feel after the interviews?

I was very relieved, and slightly confused. I was relieved because obviously the whole process was very stressful, so I could finally take a break when everything was done. The application process has taken a toll on my sleeping quality so I was happy to get a good night’s sleep again. I also had dinner with my dad (he accompanied me to Cambridge) at a nice restaurant to celebrate. At the same time I was also a bit confused, as I didn’t know if I did well or not (especially the second interview). I didn’t trust my gut feeling, since I couldn’t differentiate if I felt satisfied because I really did well in reality, or I felt satisfied because I hoped myself had done well. I’d say that from the end of my interviews till decision day (precisely a month), I remained ‘quietly hopeful’. After my interviews I went on a shopping spree to buy Christmas presents for my friends.


14. Where were you when you got your offer? How did you react?

I was at home. Cambridge decision day was torturous, since I was hours ahead of the UK on 15/1. Worse still, I was going to have my first mock the next day and I should really be revising, but I couldn’t concentrate at all. My mind was all over the place. I actually received the mail in the evening BUT IT WENT INTO PROMOTIONS. So I waited, and waited, and waited, and finally my mind came up with the brilliant idea of checking the promotions mailbox late at night and voila! – the mail was there. I opened the mail and saw the first three words ‘I am delighted...’ and that’s when I knew I got in. I told a bunch of people and I was so high on adrenaline, I couldn’t sleep until 2 in the morning. Fortunately my mocks did not suffer great casualties.
LESSON LEARNT: CHECK YOUR PROMOTIONS MAILBOX PEOPLE!


15. Are you looking forward to coming up to Cambridge?

Very! It has always been my dream school. The collegiate system sounds so lovely and whatever the outcome, I am forever grateful for my offer.

Thank you so much for reading, and feel free to PM me should you have any questions!
Last edited by Books+lemonade; 1 year ago
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Oxford Mum
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Hi Books+Lemonade! thank you for a very thought provoking chapter!

When I first got your message saying you wanted to write a chapter about PBS, I didn't know what that was, so I checked and here is the course

https://www.undergraduate.study.cam....oural-sciences

So when I read your chapter I went from not knowing what it was, to thinking that if I applied to Oxbridge, this would be the very course I would be interested in. Like you, I am fascinated to know why people think as they think. People never fail to surprise me (sometimes in a good, sometimes in a bad way!)
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FAQs about the course

https://www.pbs.tripos.cam.ac.uk/pro...-tripos-course

Recommended reading

https://www.kings.cam.ac.uk/study/un...s-reading-list

interview questions

https://www.cambridgeinterviewquesti...ions/sciences/

Uni guide

https://www.theuniguide.co.uk/univer...0-db4956f27ad8

More info about the course

https://www.christs.cam.ac.uk/psycho...oural-sciences

Youtube video about the course

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j1PcOzua3q0

A day in the life of a PBS student

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t1ZSNJBPb9E

interview youtube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hasgfMqllVE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d5yNAk9VFQg
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Books+lemonade
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(Original post by Oxford Mum)
Hi Books+Lemonade! thank you for a very thought provoking chapter!

When I first got your message saying you wanted to write a chapter about PBS, I didn't know what that was, so I checked and here is the course

https://www.undergraduate.study.cam....oural-sciences

So when I read your chapter I went from not knowing what it was, to thinking that if I applied to Oxbridge, this would be the very course I would be interested in. Like you, I am fascinated to know why people think as they think. People never fail to surprise me (sometimes in a good, sometimes in a bad way!)
Thank you for your kind words! Hope this can help prospective applicants!
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Oxford Mum
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It's very interesting that you started being more and more aware of others when you were in your teenage years. At this age we do start becoming more self conscious and caring about what others think. That very easily leads from "what do they think", to "why do they think that"?

Then at my age, you tend to care a lot less what others think, as you realise they aren't thinking of you at all, but of themselves! (what an old cynic I am).

Looking at the world through your eyes, I can see why your age is the perfect time to use your natural curiosity to become a psychologist. That's pretty mind blowing, to be honest.

Yes, both Oxford and Cambridge are both excellent for research, so that's a great reason to apply. The flexibility of the tripos is a feature very much treasured by Cambridge students and graduates alike, so I can see why you found it so attractive. Plus the range of topics must be very exciting to explore and develop your knowledge.
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(Original post by Books+lemonade)
Thank you for your kind words! Hope this can help prospective applicants!
Still posting about your chapter, OP!
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Oxford Mum
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I am delighted to see that you also credit good old TSR for helping you! When I was last at Oxford, all the students I spoke to said they used TSR and yes, it did help them get in!

It's particularly edifying to see that you give a shout out to Peterhouse Admissions for all the wonderful (and, of course, accurate!) help he gives, both now and over the years. Long may it continue. All the help that Cambridge students and graduates give, as well, are gratefully received.

As you mentioned, your one to one mentorship made all the difference to your application. Zero Gravity does offer this free one to one mentoring

https://www.zerogravity.co.uk/impact

but it is only available to UK state school students. The insider information you speak about is the most valuable aspect of such schemes.

My son (a medic) is very interested in neurology and it's interesting to note that your bookshelves and his probably have very similar contents!

You also looked at your favourite college, and looked at what your future DOS (tutor) was interested in. My son approached it slightly differently. He had an interest and looked for a tutor who had similar interests. This tactic sometimes doesn't work though, as the tutor may actually not teach undergraduates, or may only be there temporarily etc.
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Peterhouse Admissions
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(Original post by Oxford Mum)
I am delighted to see that you also credit good old TSR for helping you! When I was last at Oxford, all the students I spoke to said they used TSR and yes, it did help them get in!

It's particularly edifying to see that you give a shout out to Peterhouse Admissions for all the wonderful (and, of course, accurate!) help he gives, both now and over the years. Long may it continue. All the help that Cambridge students and graduates give, as well, are gratefully received.

As you mentioned, your one to one mentorship made all the difference to your application. Zero Gravity does offer this free one to one mentoring

https://www.zerogravity.co.uk/impact

but it is only available to UK state school students. The insider information you speak about is the most valuable aspect of such schemes.

My son (a medic) is very interested in neurology and it's interesting to note that your bookshelves and his probably have very similar contents!

You also looked at your favourite college, and looked at what your future DOS (tutor) was interested in. My son approached it slightly differently. He had an interest and looked for a tutor who had similar interests. This tactic sometimes doesn't work though, as the tutor may actually not teach undergraduates, or may only be there temporarily etc.
*she
** my predecessor was indeed male (and probably the person OP is thanking!), but all the people who now have access to this account are female
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Oxford Mum
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Local universities are a surprising resource and very useful they can be too! My son's local uni is Sheffield, and he has attended talks after school about various subjects. Those two courses were invaluable in developing your knowledge and strengthening your curiosity about your subject.

The volunteering in hospitals was a masterstroke. You were able to go in and really talk to people to gain insights into the way their minds work. You then matched your experiences in hospital and talking to the patients with the academic theory behind it. So you are not just gossiping with the patients, you are also taking a professional interest in what they are saying and why they are saying it.

As with most Oxbridge Demystified chapter writers, you went into the admissions test with a plan. You played to your own strengths, avoiding parts where you could have scored lower. You did lots of papers, MCQ practice, and wrote lots of practice essays.

It's important to know what you are walking into when you are faced with the test.
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I am very glad you got to go to the open day, visit the college you have now chosen, and speak to the admissions staff. This was, unfortunately not possible this year. For those who could not make Cambridge's virtual open day, here is the colleges chapter of Cambridge demystified, along with videos and the websites. It's probably also a good idea to look at the maps as well when making college selections, so you are spatially aware of all the college's locations

https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho...e%20Demystifie

Plus of course, as Ms Peterhouse has said in the past, you can always make an open application, if you don't want to choose a college yourself.
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I noticed that when you went to Cambridge for your interviews, you had a general, friendly interview, then a more subject intensive one. One of my friends went up to Cambridge for economics interviews and the format was the same for her, too.

It's obviously important for this interview to brush up on your graph drawing skills and get used to looking at passages and discussing them critically. This may be something you can practise with your teachers beforehand. I am impressed that, because of the wider reading you undertook, you came across an area you had already studied and were able to discuss this matter effectively. Some may call that luck, but I call it being prepared (this happened to my economics friend, too!)

I loved the fact that you made the most of your interview, calling it a "wonderful opportunity to discuss your passion with a leading expert" rather than "oh no, this will be so hard, I'm going to fail". Yes, of course, it can be challenging, but it's this glass half full mentality of yours that won the day.
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I know us parents can't do much to help, or comfort you after those stressful interviews, but it's nice to see that your Dad was on hand to take you out for a slap up meal! We parents do have our uses.

Those mixed emotions are terribly common after interviews, second guessing what you might have said right or wrong, those cringey moments you wished hadn't happened... The time from interviews to results day seems to be neverending. But in the end it was worth it.

Oh, the torture, when you were waiting for the results that never seemed to come, until you looked at promotions !!! The same can be said for junk/spam mail.

However I am so glad it all turned out alright in the end.

Have a wonderful time at Cambridge, and thanks for writing this beautiful chapter.

Books+lemonade
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(Original post by Peterhouse Admissions)
*she
** my predecessor was indeed male (and probably the person OP is thanking!), but all the people who now have access to this account are female
I can remember not too long ago when you were singing Liverpool football chants on the Cambridge applicants thread. Was that you, or your male predecessor?

Harrys and I spend ages wondering who the Brasenose admissions people are, too. She imagines it's a he and he smokes a pipe, and I imagine a very glamorous lady in designer clothes.
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(Original post by Oxford Mum)
I can remember not too long ago when you were singing Liverpool football chants on the Cambridge applicants thread. Was that you, or your male predecessor?

Harrys and I spend ages wondering who the Brasenose admissions people are, too. She imagines it's a he and he smokes a pipe, and I imagine a very glamorous lady in designer clothes.
Ah! That would have been my predecessor, who was indeed from Liverpool. I love to imagine what people behind accounts are like too!
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** added to the Cambridge Demystified book now.
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(Original post by Oxford Mum)
I can remember not too long ago when you were singing Liverpool football chants on the Cambridge applicants thread. Was that you, or your male predecessor?

Harrys and I spend ages wondering who the Brasenose admissions people are, too. She imagines it's a he and he smokes a pipe, and I imagine a very glamorous lady in designer clothes.
Hola Oxford Mum,

Harry is way off the mark but you are one-sixth right.

Brasenose Admissions
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(Original post by Oxford Mum)
I noticed that when you went to Cambridge for your interviews, you had a general, friendly interview, then a more subject intensive one. One of my friends went up to Cambridge for economics interviews and the format was the same for her, too.

It's obviously important for this interview to brush up on your graph drawing skills and get used to looking at passages and discussing them critically. This may be something you can practise with your teachers beforehand. I am impressed that, because of the wider reading you undertook, you came across an area you had already studied and were able to discuss this matter effectively. Some may call that luck, but I call it being prepared (this happened to my economics friend, too!)

I loved the fact that you made the most of your interview, calling it a "wonderful opportunity to discuss your passion with a leading expert" rather than "oh no, this will be so hard, I'm going to fail". Yes, of course, it can be challenging, but it's this glass half full mentality of yours that won the day.
Yes, I was very lucky to come across a topic I’ve read about before, and I did do a lot of preparation at the same time. I would say reading widely definitely pays off.
As for the attitude when approaching the interview, I think turning the nervousness into excitement helped me perform better. Sure, I know it’s kind of a ‘make or break’ situation, but distracting myself by thinking of the interview as a fun opportunity (most people could if they are passionate about a subject - who would pass up an opportunity to engage in a one-to-one discussion with an expert?!) also worked. This is perhaps also psychology
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(Original post by BrasenoseAdm)
Hola Oxford Mum,

Harry is way off the mark but you are one-sixth right.

Brasenose Admissions
Possibly one of the most intriguing remarks I have seen on TSR. Does that mean only one sixth of you is glamorous, or that there are six of you and only one of you is glamorous, lol?

Whenever I go to Exeter (elder son's college) I look over from the mound at Brasenose, and wonder how you are doing (rather brilliantly, I would imagine)

harrysbar, looks like you have lost the bet..
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