MSc cyber security online: York vs Glyndwr

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prog1984
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Hello everyone.

I am kinda new here. I am interested in cyber security MSc online. I see York is well reputed but then again Glyndwr is more focused in cyber security. What do you suggest? Both offering MSc in comp science with cyber security online.

Thanks!
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commodoro
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York has a very good reputation overall so I guess they'd be a good choice.

I don't know how respected Glyndwr is to be honest, i'd only heard of them because of the online adverts for that particular course. But it could be worth it.

Remember the harder they are to get a place, more likely the better it will be (not always true). If they let anyone on, the course most likely isn't going to be that focused and therefore not as valued by employers after.
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mike23mike
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(Original post by prog1984)
Hello everyone.

I am kinda new here. I am interested in cyber security MSc online. I see York is well reputed but then again Glyndwr is more focused in cyber security. What do you suggest? Both offering MSc in comp science with cyber security online.

Thanks!
York is a prestigious leading UK university. It's in the coveted Russell Group of universities. York has been offering online programmes for many years. I had to look up the University of Glyndwr. It's a further education college which now has University Status. It does not have any reputation since its so new.

Please go to York, you will not be disappointed.
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prog1984
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(Original post by commodoro)
York has a very good reputation overall so I guess they'd be a good choice.

I don't know how respected Glyndwr is to be honest, i'd only heard of them because of the online adverts for that particular course. But it could be worth it.

Remember the harder they are to get a place, more likely the better it will be (not always true). If they let anyone on, the course most likely isn't going to be that focused and therefore not as valued by employers after.
I see York MSc on campus cyber security is totally focused on cyber security but the online one is partially focused where as Glyndwr has all of the modules related to cyber security in their online program. Will this make a difference? I am also unsure about actual course contents
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elsap0p
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(Original post by mike23mike)
York is a prestigious leading UK university. It's in the coveted Russell Group of universities. York has been offering online programmes for many years. I had to look up the University of Glyndwr. It's a further education college which now has University Status. It does not have any reputation since its so new.

Please go to York, you will not be disappointed.
I so do not agree about the status. Have you seen the threads about the York course? According to their site the course only lets 25 people onto the course each time it runs. That isn't correct and the modules on the carousel mean that start-groups end up on the same modules, which can mean 150+ people on a module. I know that the course at York starts with Java programming in the first week, so if you don't have any programming experience I can imagine that is tough. If you do, then it is probably fine, but the course claims to be for people with no experience of Computer Science.

I am on the Glyndwr course. I started in september and am happy so far (ok, I'm only on week 3). I like the fact that the first module is about how to write papers, something which will be useful on most, if not all of the modules on the course. I took my undergraduate degree over 20 years ago and haven't really written much since, and certainly nothing academic. I chose Glyndwr because it has the best modules.
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Karolens
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(Original post by elsap0p)
I so do not agree about the status. Have you seen the threads about the York course? According to their site the course only lets 25 people onto the course each time it runs. That isn't correct and the modules on the carousel mean that start-groups end up on the same modules, which can mean 150+ people on a module. I know that the course at York starts with Java programming in the first week, so if you don't have any programming experience I can imagine that is tough. If you do, then it is probably fine, but the course claims to be for people with no experience of Computer Science.

I am on the Glyndwr course. I started in september and am happy so far (ok, I'm only on week 3). I like the fact that the first module is about how to write papers, something which will be useful on most, if not all of the modules on the course. I took my undergraduate degree over 20 years ago and haven't really written much since, and certainly nothing academic. I chose Glyndwr because it has the best modules.
Good evening. Are you still on this course? I am preparing an application form for Msc CS for September. I was contemplating between Bath and York. Had a really good read in the forum regarding both Bath and York, and wasn`t amused on feedback I read. What would you have to say about Glyndwr? I checked modules, they seem really great, and the price of course is so competitive. How`s the quality of studies? I do not have prior experience in CS, although made half through Harvard`s CS50. Do you have a tutor, who`s willing to communicate when you are stuck and etc.?
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elsap0p
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(Original post by Karolens)
Good evening. Are you still on this course? I am preparing an application form for Msc CS for September. I was contemplating between Bath and York. Had a really good read in the forum regarding both Bath and York, and wasn`t amused on feedback I read. What would you have to say about Glyndwr? I checked modules, they seem really great, and the price of course is so competitive. How`s the quality of studies? I do not have prior experience in CS, although made half through Harvard`s CS50. Do you have a tutor, who`s willing to communicate when you are stuck and etc.?
Hi
I have now done 4 modules with Glyndwr.
The first one was the Critical reading module which has been run quite a few times and although most of the content doesn't relate to IT the last assignment did. I found the module quite useful.

The second module I studied was Digital Forensics. It was the first time the module had run I think and there were some teething problems. The assignments were quite interesting, but you only really learn about Forensics. We did have access to Immersive labs which is the best thing about the whole Msc to be honest - although the labs are either really easy or way to hard (in my opinion). As with a lot of IT, it is a case of trial and error and finding things out for yourself. At the start of the module we were instructed how to install a virtual machine, but were never given any instructions about using it during the module, so it really depends on how confident you are about trying things yourself and how much time you have to put in.

The third module was Security and Risk management, which I had been quite looking forward to. I was really disappointed though and didn't really enjoy the module although I did learn quite a lot from the 2nd assignment. This was also the first time the module had run.

The third module (current) is Networking Principles (I swapped programme from Cyber security to Networking because I didn't think I would get enought out of the Secure Software development module). This module is really bad and it will be my last module. If I pass I will be eligible for a PGCert.
The Secure software development is also really bad. There are 6 assignments in 7 weeks and no answers from the tutors.

Positives:
I did learn quite a lot from the assignments, although as the modules are only 7 weeks of teaching so the scope is very limited. I learnt more from being in a Telegram group with fellow students than I did from the teachers. It is a postgrad course, so you have to do your own research for the assignments.

Negatives:
Very little response from the tutors, the modules are really too short to really learn anything, the feedback takes too long - around 4 weeks. The assignment questions are poorly designed and the word counts too small. The modules are new so need improvement - everyone I talked to was giving a lot of feedback about how bad the modules were.

All in all I would say that if you have an IT background and want an Msc, then it is possible to do the course, but you won't necessarily learn much that is useful. If you don't have an IT background, I wouldn't recommend the course. If you only want to learn about IT, then is is suitable, but you don't learn how to do anything.

Overall impression is that the course is offered by the Uni, but the teaching staff aren't necessarily interested (or even aware) that they are "teaching" people online!

Of the courses that are available I would consider Essex to be the best option if you don't have an IT background. I don't know what the course is like there though, but they looked to be slightly more organised for people with less of an IT background.
I work in IT and have taken alot of courses, so consider that I have some IT, but not an IT background. I was looking to fill the gaps, but really just got some very specific knowledge on a small range of subjects.

I got to the filter assignment on CS50 before I started this course. CS50 has way better teaching and I hope to go back to it and finish it this summer.

I hope this is helpful!
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Karolens
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(Original post by elsap0p)
Hi
I have now done 4 modules with Glyndwr.
The first one was the Critical reading module which has been run quite a few times and although most of the content doesn't relate to IT the last assignment did. I found the module quite useful.

The second module I studied was Digital Forensics. It was the first time the module had run I think and there were some teething problems. The assignments were quite interesting, but you only really learn about Forensics. We did have access to Immersive labs which is the best thing about the whole Msc to be honest - although the labs are either really easy or way to hard (in my opinion). As with a lot of IT, it is a case of trial and error and finding things out for yourself. At the start of the module we were instructed how to install a virtual machine, but were never given any instructions about using it during the module, so it really depends on how confident you are about trying things yourself and how much time you have to put in.

The third module was Security and Risk management, which I had been quite looking forward to. I was really disappointed though and didn't really enjoy the module although I did learn quite a lot from the 2nd assignment. This was also the first time the module had run.

The third module (current) is Networking Principles (I swapped programme from Cyber security to Networking because I didn't think I would get enought out of the Secure Software development module). This module is really bad and it will be my last module. If I pass I will be eligible for a PGCert.
The Secure software development is also really bad. There are 6 assignments in 7 weeks and no answers from the tutors.

Positives:
I did learn quite a lot from the assignments, although as the modules are only 7 weeks of teaching so the scope is very limited. I learnt more from being in a Telegram group with fellow students than I did from the teachers. It is a postgrad course, so you have to do your own research for the assignments.

Negatives:
Very little response from the tutors, the modules are really too short to really learn anything, the feedback takes too long - around 4 weeks. The assignment questions are poorly designed and the word counts too small. The modules are new so need improvement - everyone I talked to was giving a lot of feedback about how bad the modules were.

All in all I would say that if you have an IT background and want an Msc, then it is possible to do the course, but you won't necessarily learn much that is useful. If you don't have an IT background, I wouldn't recommend the course. If you only want to learn about IT, then is is suitable, but you don't learn how to do anything.

Overall impression is that the course is offered by the Uni, but the teaching staff aren't necessarily interested (or even aware) that they are "teaching" people online!

Of the courses that are available I would consider Essex to be the best option if you don't have an IT background. I don't know what the course is like there though, but they looked to be slightly more organised for people with less of an IT background.
I work in IT and have taken alot of courses, so consider that I have some IT, but not an IT background. I was looking to fill the gaps, but really just got some very specific knowledge on a small range of subjects.

I got to the filter assignment on CS50 before I started this course. CS50 has way better teaching and I hope to go back to it and finish it this summer.

I hope this is helpful!
Thank you for thorough answer! It seems all those courses more or less are the same(Online Msc conversion)
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Earl of Sandwich
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(Original post by prog1984)
Hello everyone.

I am kinda new here. I am interested in cyber security MSc online. I see York is well reputed but then again Glyndwr is more focused in cyber security. What do you suggest? Both offering MSc in comp science with cyber security online.

Thanks!
I know it was a year ago that you asked this question, but I thought I'd respond in case it is helpful to other people reading it

So basically, Wrexham Glyndwr's Online MSc in Computer Science is like a MOOC (massive open online class), except that you're paying for it. The number of students in the class is large and they come from all over the world. Some students are really smart people who have been working in tech for decades, but others barely speak English.

There are no lecturers or professors. You just watch videos that were recorded a year or two ago, and then do the assigned readings. Instead of lecturers, you have "module tutors and leaders" who rarely ever join in on the forum discussions. That's why I say it is like a MOOC, because there really isn't much contact with the university staff at all, so you pretty much learn everything from your own readings (textbook and research during the assignments) and you learn from the forum posts written by experienced students who currently work in tech. When assignments are due, everyone goes onto the forum to ask questions like "Can I put images and tables in my essay and how do I reference them?" - and because the university staff don't write back, you have to wait to hear what other students think and then hope the people who answer your question are right. So it's basically a MOOC, except that WGU does mark our assignments, which is the one thing that makes it feel like you're at university instead of enrolled into a free MOOC on Coursera.

The university is fine for older students who have been working in tech for 20 years, because they know all the answers anyway and are just looking for a low-cost master's to add to their CV. But if you are a younger student and you actually want to learn about tech, I don't recommend it because you won't get any help from the university employees. The main value in the programme at WGU is learning from the older students.

As others said, the cyber security modules are bad, but it was recently announced that the lady who oversees the cyber security classes at WGU is leaving, so I think perhaps next year there might be some improvements made. My guess is the university got a lot of negative feedback about the cyber security / security and risk modules, and they realised it was time to make some changes.

Don't expect the enrolments employees to ever write back to you - they use really bad automation software to respond to your question, and it is so bad that it gives you an answer that is nothing related to what you asked. It's terrible. It's the perfect example of AI gone wrong. I laugh when I get responses from the enrolments people, because the AI response is like getting a response from a mentally ******ed person.
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Earl of Sandwich
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(Original post by elsap0p)
Overall impression is that the course is offered by the Uni, but the teaching staff aren't necessarily interested (or even aware) that they are "teaching" people online!
This is so funny. Yes, I would agree. Some module leaders disappear for a week or two (right in the middle of the 7 week module teaching period), and then they return and act like they forgot they had a class to teach.

My guess is that most tutors/ module leaders are part-time employees, because they don't appear to put more than about 1 hour per week into the modules they teach. They seem to be hired as freelancers who just come in mark assignments, and occasionally answer a forum Q&A question (most questions go unanswered though). The university tells students to write questions on the forum, not email the employees, as they're hoping other students will answer the question and do their job for them.
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