Opinions on my potential LLM Dissertation topics?

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LS1998
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#1
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I have narrowed my options down to two parts of the law which I am intrigued by. I cannot research both, so any constructive criticism would be appreciated.
My Dissertation is set to start next summer, but I just want to have something to go on.

Institutionalised Racism:
A case study of the extent the role racial bias plays in the application of expansive Police Powers and upholding the monitoring and reporting mechanisms of hate crimes in the UK.

To what extent does the current law on the best interests of the child undermine the victims of domestic violence?
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DrD_1598
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Neither of these are great to be honest. Your first doesn't make sense. How are you proposing to complete your case study? How will you demonstrate racial bias? In whom? What expansive powers? Why is police powers capitalised?

Your 2nd one, doesn't make sense either. It's the law the best interests of any child come first, undermining doesn't come into it. Also, don't see how looking after the child could undermine DV victims, how are those related?
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LS1998
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Police Powers are named and given by the Executive branch of government.
I am looking at the use of the associated Power of Arrest, Stop and Search etc to convey statistic and socio-cultural assumptions against ethnic minorities.
I was also planning on composing fieldwork in qualitative and quantitative data to demonstrate public opinion.

As in upholding the “best interests” principle disregards the voices of the mother’s that have had to suffer domestic violence.
This would be taking the idea that the courts uphold a contact centralised approach to child-rearing, despite risks of DV being present.

(Original post by DrD_1598)
Neither of these are great to be honest. Your first doesn't make sense. How are you proposing to complete your case study? How will you demonstrate racial bias? In whom? What expansive powers? Why is police powers capitalised?

Your 2nd one, doesn't make sense either. It's the law the best interests of any child come first, undermining doesn't come into it. Also, don't see how looking after the child could undermine DV victims, how are those related?
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Joleee
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they're both confusing. a hate crime is where the perpetrator is motivated by hostility or demonstrates hostility towards the victim's race, religion etc - so how does racial bias by the police interfere with monitoring and reporting of said crime? what does stop and search have to do with it? you sure this doesn't sound more like criminology than law?

the courts always have the best interest of the child at the centre of decision-making - not the parents and not any 'contract'. you just have to get a court order to undo any family arrangement, namely a non-molestation order. why do you think the opposite?
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LS1998
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The latter would be based in how contact is given in the idea of upholding family dynamics, despite violence being shown- such as in cases
about contact which fail to take safety into account endanger women and children physically and emotionally (e.g. Radford et al, 1997; Mullender et al, 2002; Harrison, 2008; Thiara, 2010; Thiara & Gill, 2012), and in some cases where courts have allowed unsupervised contact with violent men, children have been killed (Saunders, 2004).

The latter would be looking at the failure surrounding the reporting of black crimes as a potential reflection of racial bias institutionalised- the Lammy report for example.

(Original post by Joleee)
they're both confusing. a hate crime is where the perpetrator is motivated by hostility or demonstrates hostility towards the victim's race, religion etc - so how does racial bias by the police interfere with monitoring and reporting of said crime? what does stop and search have to do with it? you sure this doesn't sound more like criminology than law?

the courts always have the best interest of the child at the centre of decision-making - not the parents and not any 'contract'. you just have to get a court order to undo any family arrangement, namely a non-molestation order. why do you think the opposite?
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kp07l
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Have you thought about making contact with your dissertation tutor or someone relevant to the field? They might be able to give you some better advice on the viability of the topic or some reading to do and most are happy to discuss their research with a student.
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LS1998
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I have asked at York if I am able to talk to my supervisor yet, but as the modules/personal supervisors are still being sorted out, I have to wait until late September.
It just seems better to start the work when you can, which is what I was thinking of doing.
(Original post by kp07l)
Have you thought about making contact with your dissertation tutor or someone relevant to the field? They might be able to give you some better advice on the viability of the topic or some reading to do and most are happy to discuss their research with a student.
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