shreyapv
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Hi there. So I'm going to go to year 11 in September but am feeling a bit stressed. I'd say year 10 was going pretty well as I do pretty well in my school lessons and topic tests generally go very well. In my mocks I got 4 9s, 1 8, 4 7s and a 6 in RS which really put me down however but I want to redeem myself in my year 11 mocks which we will hopefully do if Corona doesn't get in the way. Now I have three weeks left of the summer and I'm just getting started with my revision. Can I still get all 9s for my GCSE's next year if I tried extra hard? And please could people recommend good ways to plan year 11 out and keep myself organised so I don't stress!
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alwaysneedadvice
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First of all, please don't feel stressed. You have a whole year ahead of you and a lot can change. I've seen people improve their grades rapidly during Year 11, so don't let that single 6 push you down. You can get whatever grades you want if you try really hard, trust me. I think the only way it works, though, is if you stay consistent. It's easy to burn out on the last few days if your doing a lot of revision within a small amount of time.

Active recall is the best way to learn. Whether it's flashcards or quizzes, don't use them passively once every month! Create flashcards for each topic of a subject and go through them. The ones you get right straight away, answer them every week. The ones you get right the second time around, answer them every 3 days. The ones you get right the 3rd time around, answer them everyday.

Do an practice exam at the end of each week and save the questions you got wrong to do at a later date (maybe the following week).

Use a revision timetable. This wasn't exactly for me but a lot of people find this useful. Block out your days into hours, and schedule what revision you're going to do each week. I don't use that method. I prefer this method: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BBHc...st=WL&index=10 It divides your subjects into topics. You write notes for each of them, write flashcards, etc. for each of them (whatever you find is best) and tick them off. Eventually you can use your resources for active recall later down the line.

A lot of revision is subject specific, so I can't really provide much more than I have. Sorry! I recently answered a similar question about how to revise, so maybe this will be helpful.

"I think generally active recall helps A LOT. Try using flashcards (actively) or doing practice questions or even just quizzes.

Maths - Formulas & Practice Questions. Doing exam questions and booklets full of questions will improve your grade for sure. You can look at the mark scheme, see how they get to the answer or even ask your teacher how to do that question. In my class we did exam booklets every week for homework and as much as I didn't like doing it in the moment, it really helped. A lot of questions are more similar than you think.
https://corbettmaths.com/ (work sheets, exam questions) & https://revisionmaths.com/gcse-maths-revision (explanations) & https://www.mathsgenie.co.uk/gcse.html (this is amazing!) & https://www.onmaths.com/ (exam questions) & https://mathsbot.com/ (has everything).

Science - Flashcards, Flashcards, Flashcards! Getting key facts and information down is key. Do a lot of practice questions, too. Mark schemes are always the same, so if you use the same phrases you're guaranteed to get marks. BBC Bitesize is good for science, basically has all you need in your specific spec. Just type in your exam board and do the exam papers and mark yourself using the mark schemes.
Physics: https://www.physicsandmathstutor.com/physics-revision/
Biology: https://www.physicsandmathstutor.com/biology-revision/
Chemistry: https://www.physicsandmathstutor.com...stry-revision/
YouTubers: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCaG...rjou9kQx6ezG2w (Cognito) & https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBg...R4QIK2e0EfJwaA (Primrose Kitten) & https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqb...Xw9Il7sBVG3_bw (Freesciencelessons)

Literature: Have a bank of quotes you can use for each topic. Learning quotes is the main thing you need to do. Do practice questions and get your teacher to mark it and give you feedback. I don't know what books you're learning so here are some good sites/youtubers.
https://www.sparknotes.com/ & https://www.cliffsnotes.com/ & https://www.litcharts.com/lit/romeo-and-juliet
https://www.youtube.com/user/mrbruff
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC92...6bpEZe9x62Et3Q

Language: Do practice questions and get your word classes down!
https://www.youtube.com/user/mrbruff
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoC...Rry5IbQ6SALl9g

Good luck!"


However, the best advice I can give is for you to enjoy Year 11 while you are there. My last few months of Year 11 were swiped away from me, and I wish I had opened up more to my peers and tried new things out, instead of being so hesitant. Listen to what your teachers say and go to those revision evenings and extra lessons they give, if you can. Your teachers will try to help you as much as they can during the lead up to your mocks and your GCSEs, so use the help they're providing. If your struggling on a subject, go ask for help too.

Oh and... Chill out! :rofl3: You're mock grades don't define you and neither do your GCSE grades.
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shreyapv
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(Original post by alwaysneedadvice)
First of all, please don't feel stressed. You have a whole year ahead of you and a lot can change. I've seen people improve their grades rapidly during Year 11, so don't let that single 6 push you down. You can get whatever grades you want if you try really hard, trust me. I think the only way it works, though, is if you stay consistent. It's easy to burn out on the last few days if your doing a lot of revision within a small amount of time.

Active recall is the best way to learn. Whether it's flashcards or quizzes, don't use them passively once every month! Create flashcards for each topic of a subject and go through them. The ones you get right straight away, answer them every week. The ones you get right the second time around, answer them every 3 days. The ones you get right the 3rd time around, answer them everyday.

Do an practice exam at the end of each week and save the questions you got wrong to do at a later date (maybe the following week).

Use a revision timetable. This wasn't exactly for me but a lot of people find this useful. Block out your days into hours, and schedule what revision you're going to do each week. I don't use that method. I prefer this method: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BBHc...st=WL&index=10 It divides your subjects into topics. You write notes for each of them, write flashcards, etc. for each of them (whatever you find is best) and tick them off. Eventually you can use your resources for active recall later down the line.

A lot of revision is subject specific, so I can't really provide much more than I have. Sorry! I recently answered a similar question about how to revise, so maybe this will be helpful.

"I think generally active recall helps A LOT. Try using flashcards (actively) or doing practice questions or even just quizzes.

Maths - Formulas & Practice Questions. Doing exam questions and booklets full of questions will improve your grade for sure. You can look at the mark scheme, see how they get to the answer or even ask your teacher how to do that question. In my class we did exam booklets every week for homework and as much as I didn't like doing it in the moment, it really helped. A lot of questions are more similar than you think.
https://corbettmaths.com/ (work sheets, exam questions) & https://revisionmaths.com/gcse-maths-revision (explanations) & https://www.mathsgenie.co.uk/gcse.html (this is amazing!) & https://www.onmaths.com/ (exam questions) & https://mathsbot.com/ (has everything).

Science - Flashcards, Flashcards, Flashcards! Getting key facts and information down is key. Do a lot of practice questions, too. Mark schemes are always the same, so if you use the same phrases you're guaranteed to get marks. BBC Bitesize is good for science, basically has all you need in your specific spec. Just type in your exam board and do the exam papers and mark yourself using the mark schemes.
Physics: https://www.physicsandmathstutor.com/physics-revision/
Biology: https://www.physicsandmathstutor.com/biology-revision/
Chemistry: https://www.physicsandmathstutor.com...stry-revision/
YouTubers: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCaG...rjou9kQx6ezG2w (Cognito) & https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBg...R4QIK2e0EfJwaA (Primrose Kitten) & https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCqb...Xw9Il7sBVG3_bw (Freesciencelessons)

Literature: Have a bank of quotes you can use for each topic. Learning quotes is the main thing you need to do. Do practice questions and get your teacher to mark it and give you feedback. I don't know what books you're learning so here are some good sites/youtubers.
https://www.sparknotes.com/ & https://www.cliffsnotes.com/ & https://www.litcharts.com/lit/romeo-and-juliet
https://www.youtube.com/user/mrbruff
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC92...6bpEZe9x62Et3Q

Language: Do practice questions and get your word classes down!
https://www.youtube.com/user/mrbruff
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoC...Rry5IbQ6SALl9g

Good luck!"


However, the best advice I can give is for you to enjoy Year 11 while you are there. My last few months of Year 11 were swiped away from me, and I wish I had opened up more to my peers and tried new things out, instead of being so hesitant. Listen to what your teachers say and go to those revision evenings and extra lessons they give, if you can. Your teachers will try to help you as much as they can during the lead up to your mocks and your GCSEs, so use the help they're providing. If your struggling on a subject, go ask for help too.

Oh and... Chill out! :rofl3: You're mock grades don't define you and neither do your GCSE grades.
Honestly thank you so much for all of that! I feel quite calm after reading that and I fully understand that my GCSE's don't define me it's just me trying to meet my expectations but I guess in year 10 I didn't try as hard to meet them! But I've learnt from that. I had a look at those links and they were so good, especially that revision technique because I can't ever stick to a timetable. But thank you so much once again!
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alwaysneedadvice
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(Original post by shreyapv)
Honestly thank you so much for all of that! I feel quite calm after reading that and I fully understand that my GCSE's don't define me it's just me trying to meet my expectations but I guess in year 10 I didn't try as hard to meet them! But I've learnt from that. I had a look at those links and they were so good, especially that revision technique because I can't ever stick to a timetable. But thank you so much once again!
I'm sorry for the late reply. I'm glad I help you ease your mind. Trust me, I know what it's like when you're trying to meet your expectations. I wanted to get 9s in everything and when I didn't get those 9s I was devastated. However, don't let that disappointment knock you down, use it to build you up and try harder next time! I'm starting college soon, and I know it's going to be a complete shock because of the change in difficulty levels but, I'll be trying my best. I hope you've been doing the same since Year 11 has started! Good luck!
Last edited by alwaysneedadvice; 2 weeks ago
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