username5290958
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Is an English literature and creative writing degree worth taking, or should I just take English literature. I would like to be a copy editor/proofreader/book publisher, and one day an author.
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Wes - Newman Uni
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(Original post by Marianne126)
Is an English literature and creative writing degree worth taking, or should I just take English literature. I would like to be a copy editor/proofreader/book publisher, and one day an author.
Marianne126 This is a good question and very good you are considering your options
Have you looked at any universities yet and compared the English lit on its own and when combined with Creative writing?

Wes - Newman University Ambassador
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nathan1403
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If it's a joint honours degree or even major/minor honours then you've got nothing to lose. Most English degrees will also include (optional) creative writing modules, so it's really just about selecting unis that you like and looking at specific course content
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Uni of Hull Students
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(Original post by Marianne126)
Is an English literature and creative writing degree worth taking, or should I just take English literature. I would like to be a copy editor/proofreader/book publisher, and one day an author.
Hi Marianne126

Both degrees have a range of future prospects.

Our BA Creative Writing and English degree have future prospects including Publishing and Professional writing.
Throughout the degree, you'll build a varied portfolio of work and develop desirable skills in analysis, research and communication.
The ability to showcase a creative mind through creative writing is also highly valuable to employers as it is a rare skill in today's employment market.

Hull has a long association with creative writing. The city was the home of poets Andrew Marvell and Philip Larkin, while the University counts Douglas Dunn and Roger McGough among its alumni.
You'll develop your confidence in writing by developing core skills in characterisation, storytelling and creating a sense of place. You'll also create and refine longer pieces of writing, experimenting in different genres and forms – including fantasy and science fiction, non-fiction, scriptwriting, short stories and poetry.
You also get taught by published fiction writers who will be in an excellent position to offer advice moving forward.

Our BA English programme has similar future prospects to the BA Creative Writing and English Programme. This programme trains you to analyse, research and communicate at a very high level - giving you skills that are prized in many professions.

I hope that this provides a useful insight into these degrees

Best wishes

Emily
University of Hull Student Representative
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UniversityOfSunderland
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(Original post by Marianne126)
Is an English literature and creative writing degree worth taking, or should I just take English literature. I would like to be a copy editor/proofreader/book publisher, and one day an author.
Hi Marianne126

Both degrees are absolutely worth taking and provide fantastic future prospects. Based on your career goals, finding a university that offers something like our English: Creative and Professional Writing course will give you the skills and knowledge to work as a professional writer, building on your interest in English.
Alternatively, our BA English course, allows you to follow a common curriculum in the first year covering the three main branches of contemporary English studies: English Language, English Literature and Creative Writing. In the second and third year you can then choose to specialise in one of these branches while taking modules from other areas. If you are struggling to choose right now, selecting a course like this will allow you to make a decision further down the line while getting experience in all areas to see which one suits you more.

If you would like to find out more about the English courses we offer, we are hosting an online open day on Saturday 19th September where you can chat with academics and current students, as well as explore our campus and facilities.
You can also chat with our current students here to find out more about life in Sunderland.
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Lancaster Student Ambassador
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(Original post by Marianne126)
Is an English literature and creative writing degree worth taking, or should I just take English literature. I would like to be a copy editor/proofreader/book publisher, and one day an author.
Hi @Marianne126,

I'm currently studying English Literature, Creative Writing and Practice at Lancaster University. As I have the same career ambitions as you, I would definitely recommend this as an incredible course to study. If you are passionate about writing and want to develop and hone your craft, alongside studying literature, then it's a perfect course. I always knew that I wanted to study a Joint degree of both English Lit and Creative Writing, and I chose Lancaster because it is 1st for Creative Writing in the UK, and also because of the unique style of the workshops, which enable you to receive small group feedback in a safe, positive environment.

You can find more information about the modules available here, for both my degree (which is 50% English Lit and 50% Creative Writing) and for one which is 75% Eng Lit and 25% Creative Writing. This I'd like to draw your attention to - a lot of universities offering English and Creative Writing courses have the 75/25 split, emphasising Literature, which is worth considering. Perhaps with this degree division you'd get the opportunity to try out Creative Writing, whilst also focusing on English Literature (I however, knew that I wanted to take both of them equally!). At Lancaster, additionally, with the Part 1 system, you could always take Creative Writing as a minor for a year and then can decide, at the end of first year, whether or not you want to continue.

For your career ambitions, doing Creative Writing is not essential to become a copy editor/publisher because you'll gain hugely relevant skills from studying English Literature. Again, arguably, studying a Creative Writing degree is not going to immediately make you an author, and many successful authors didn't study it as a degree. However, I've found that the course has really helped me to strengthen my confidence in my writing and allowed me to interact with and explore other genres, texts and themes.

There are also lots of different opportunities to further your career. For example, I'm hoping to do a placement year (hopefully in the publishing industry) which would give me an insight into something I'm interested in, but there are also shorter work placements aimed at developing skills and experience in the culture and heritage sectors. You can find out more information about this by checking the modules here.

I'd definitely recommend that you check out both a straight English Literature degree and different combinations that are offered, and see which one is more interesting to you. Do the modules sound exciting/interesting/scary? Can you see yourself submitting work for others? How do different universities offer to teach it?

I've written a blog about my average week as an English Lit and Creative Writing student, which you can find here. If you have any questions about studying English and/or CW at university, I'd be happy to help!

Maria
1st year English Literature, Creative Writing and Practice (placement year)
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username5290958
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(Original post by Lancaster Student Ambassador)
Hi @Marianne126,

I'm currently studying English Literature, Creative Writing and Practice at Lancaster University. As I have the same career ambitions as you, I would definitely recommend this as an incredible course to study. If you are passionate about writing and want to develop and hone your craft, alongside studying literature, then it's a perfect course. I always knew that I wanted to study a Joint degree of both English Lit and Creative Writing, and I chose Lancaster because it is 1st for Creative Writing in the UK, and also because of the unique style of the workshops, which enable you to receive small group feedback in a safe, positive environment.

You can find more information about the modules available here, for both my degree (which is 50% English Lit and 50% Creative Writing) and for one which is 75% Eng Lit and 25% Creative Writing. This I'd like to draw your attention to - a lot of universities offering English and Creative Writing courses have the 75/25 split, emphasising Literature, which is worth considering. Perhaps with this degree division you'd get the opportunity to try out Creative Writing, whilst also focusing on English Literature (I however, knew that I wanted to take both of them equally!). At Lancaster, additionally, with the Part 1 system, you could always take Creative Writing as a minor for a year and then can decide, at the end of first year, whether or not you want to continue.

For your career ambitions, doing Creative Writing is not essential to become a copy editor/publisher because you'll gain hugely relevant skills from studying English Literature. Again, arguably, studying a Creative Writing degree is not going to immediately make you an author, and many successful authors didn't study it as a degree. However, I've found that the course has really helped me to strengthen my confidence in my writing and allowed me to interact with and explore other genres, texts and themes.

There are also lots of different opportunities to further your career. For example, I'm hoping to do a placement year (hopefully in the publishing industry) which would give me an insight into something I'm interested in, but there are also shorter work placements aimed at developing skills and experience in the culture and heritage sectors. You can find out more information about this by checking the modules here.

I'd definitely recommend that you check out both a straight English Literature degree and different combinations that are offered, and see which one is more interesting to you. Do the modules sound exciting/interesting/scary? Can you see yourself submitting work for others? How do different universities offer to teach it?

I've written a blog about my average week as an English Lit and Creative Writing student, which you can find here. If you have any questions about studying English and/or CW at university, I'd be happy to help!

Maria
1st year English Literature, Creative Writing and Practice (placement year)
Thankyou for your reply! Lancaster was one of the uni’s I was looking at so this is really helpful. I would like to do more English lit than creative writing so the 75/25 split would be brilliant. I am going into year 12 now so I don’t need to decide yet, but I think over this year I will do a lot more creative writing so I will know if I would like to study it at university in any great depth. At the moment I am thinking of doing just an English degree and some of the modules at Lancaster look brilliant but I might change my mind. I know at Exeter there are modules in the English lit degree where you can do creative writing as well. Thank you for your help!

Ps I loved the blog. Very interesting to know what I might be doing in two years time.
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brihughespoet
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I highly recommend the English and Creative Writing programme at Royal Holloway
The workshops offer a perfect space to offer editorial feedback to academic peers. The course is also perfect for developing your own creative writing and course leaders are brilliant, experienced creative writers.
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