GogetaORvegito?
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Question: Which direction of motion will C travel in.

I checked the answer and it says vertically downwards, can anyone explain how you can work that out please?
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GogetaORvegito?
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(Original post by GogetaORvegito?)
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Question: Which direction of motion will C travel in.

I checked the answer and it says vertically downwards, can anyone explain how you can work that out please?
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nzy
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It's tempting to say that C will move along the wave in the direction of energy transfer, and therefore go up with the curve of the wave, but the particles in a transverse wave only oscillate up and down, so the only 2 options would be vertically up or vertically down.

What does move in the direction of energy transfer is the shape of the wave itself. You need to visualise the waveform moving 'through' the particles to the right, if that makes any sense, to see whether the particle C would move up or down.
If it helps, you can use the trough at B as a kind of example/reference point. When the wave moves right, the trough also moves right, so the trough of the wave would now be at the particle immediately to the right of B instead. In effect, B has moved vertically upwards, and the particle to it's right has moved vertically downwards. Using the same logic for C should give you the answer.
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GogetaORvegito?
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(Original post by nzy)
It's tempting to say that C will move along the wave in the direction of energy transfer, and therefore go up with the curve of the wave, but the particles in a transverse wave only oscillate up and down, so the only 2 options would be vertically up or vertically down.

What does move in the direction of energy transfer is the shape of the wave itself. You need to visualise the waveform moving 'through' the particles to the right, if that makes any sense, to see whether the particle C would move up or down.
If it helps, you can use the trough at B as a kind of example/reference point. When the wave moves right, the trough also moves right, so the trough of the wave would now be at the particle immediately to the right of B instead. In effect, B has moved vertically upwards, and the particle to it's right has moved vertically downwards. Using the same logic for C should give you the answer.
THANK YOU SO MUCH! Your analogy of the waveform moving through the particles is gold. It's like it's feeding into the waves before it!
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