vet_student5142
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Hi,

I am starting my first year at the new Harper and Keele Vet School in September which will be RCVS accredited the year I am due to graduate (2025). My dream is to practice as an equine vet in the US - I could not apply to an AVMA-accredited university due to not having a level chemistry which they all require (Glasgow, Edinburgh, RVC, Bristol).

I have done some research and I have found that to become a licensed vet in America I need to complete my ECFVG followed by the NAVLE and then passing the state veterinary exam for the state in which I wish to work.

Is there anyone that could please give me some more information on this (time, costs, difficulty etc.)?

Thank you 😊
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Popsicle_pirate
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Are you sure this is the route you want to go down rather than going to an AVMA accredited school?

All graduates (including those from the US) have to do the NAVLE and the state board exams which costs several hundred and is meant to be quite tricky but the ECFVG programme is incredibly expensive and time consuming, your school also has to be listed as recognised by them and as Harper Keele is so new I doubt it is. Why not take A-level Chemistry and apply to an AVMA-accredited school?!
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TheWannabeFarmer
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I disagree with the post above - if you are set on becoming a vet within America you are going down the right path for yourself.

Could you sit chemistry and apply to an AVMA accredited school? Sure - but that is throwing away an offer at vet school (which are INCREDIBLY competitive to achieve) to potentially not get one in the future. Realistically all vet schools in the UK teach to the same standard, they have to for RCVS accreditation. So you will finish your degree with the same minimum knowledge as everyone else - so sitting these exams afterwards shouldn't be too much of a stretch for you.

Also just another comparison - you can fail the NAVLE and other required exams and resit them. But you may never get into vet school a second time - the choice is clear.
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bristolvet94
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Well, I remember doing some research into getting AVMA licensed since I graduated from Bristol, which has only recently become AVMA accredited.

To say it is incredibly expensive is an understatement. When I was looking, I believe the fees just to sit the exams were along the lines of $10,000 and the exams could only be sat at certain vet schools in the US, over multiple days so you would also have to factor in the cost of accommodation, flights etc.

I don't know anything about how difficult it is I'm afraid, as I saw the costs and immediately just went "NOPE" haha.

Good luck, whatever path you end up going down though
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vet_student5142
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(Original post by bristolvet94)
Well, I remember doing some research into getting AVMA licensed since I graduated from Bristol, which has only recently become AVMA accredited.

To say it is incredibly expensive is an understatement. When I was looking, I believe the fees just to sit the exams were along the lines of $10,000 and the exams could only be sat at certain vet schools in the US, over multiple days so you would also have to factor in the cost of accommodation, flights etc.

I don't know anything about how difficult it is I'm afraid, as I saw the costs and immediately just went "NOPE" haha.

Good luck, whatever path you end up going down though
Thank you! When looking into it I’ve found that the ECFVG would be £1,500 then the NAVLE is
an additional £1000 then state exams are around £500, is this not correct?
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bristolvet94
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(Original post by vet_student5142)
Thank you! When looking into it I’ve found that the ECFVG would be £1,500 then the NAVLE is
an additional £1000 then state exams are around £500, is this not correct?
The quick research I've just done now seems to suggest that the $1500 for the ECFVG is a registration fee. The four different stages then all seem to have additional costs associated with them. The most expensive by far is the clinical assessment: https://www.avma.org/education/ecfvg...letin#cpe-fees

That info says that the fee to sit that section is $7,630, presumably in addition to all the other fees. So yeah, not cheap I'm afraid.
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FarmVet
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(Original post by vet_student5142)
Hi,

I am starting my first year at the new Harper and Keele Vet School in September which will be RCVS accredited the year I am due to graduate (2025). My dream is to practice as an equine vet in the US - I could not apply to an AVMA-accredited university due to not having a level chemistry which they all require (Glasgow, Edinburgh, RVC, Bristol).

I have done some research and I have found that to become a licensed vet in America I need to complete my ECFVG followed by the NAVLE and then passing the state veterinary exam for the state in which I wish to work.

Is there anyone that could please give me some more information on this (time, costs, difficulty etc.)?

Thank you 😊
Hi there,

I think it depends how important it is for you to be able to work in the USA.

Personally, having international options was fairly important for me. I graduated from the RVC this year, I am a British citizen but I took the NAVLE exam and passed first time (thank goodness!) prior to finals so that I have the option if I would like to travel and work abroad in the future. My first job as a farm vet is in the UK but I like having the option to work practically everywhere. I also enjoyed the experience of being a part of a fairly international cohort. I may never need to use the qualification but I preferred to not close any doors.Graduating from an accredited university I never had to go through the ECFVG program. The NAVLE was expensive enough without additional costs, although the RVC covered some of the costs associated with the exam for the revision resources which was great! Saying that, the process of getting a work visa for the USA is difficult in itself and so there are no guarantees. (I briefly worked at a USA veterinary university on a scholarship basis so I am familiar with some of the educational visas).

You are in a difficult situation and, personally, becoming a vet was and is still more important than working abroad, if I hadn't received an offer from an AVMA accredited university I would have carefully considered other options that still allowed RCVS registration. It is a highly personal decision and if I was in your position I might choose differently to you. The only advice I can give is to weigh up how important it is to work in the USA vs how important it is to be a vet for you.

I wish you the best of luck in making your decision and to give perspective some new graduate friends/colleagues are working as equine vets in Australia, UK, USA there are lots of options for travelling with a vet degree not just to the USA.

FarmVet

PS - as a side note there are a lot of american toxins/ poisons/ diseases/ business/ legislature that we just don't have in the UK or aren't taught about for RCVS registration. I can't speak for other AVMA accredited institutions but the RVC did address this fairly routinely for the students preparing for american exams.
Last edited by FarmVet; 4 months ago
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