tande33
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Hi, will post the image of the question below as its graphical. My thoughts are B, but I couldn't explain why A is wrong? Thanks
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tande33
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Name:  Screenshot 2020-08-23 at 10.44.05.png
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Size:  117.2 KB
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tande33
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I don't think it's C or D as they show little variation is amplitude, to me implying a large amount of dampening.
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tande33
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Surely A and B just depend on if the SHM starts at min or at equilibrium.
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RogerOxon
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(Original post by tande33)
I don't think it's C or D as they show little variation is amplitude, to me implying a large amount of dampening.
(Original post by tande33)
Surely A and B just depend on if the SHM starts at min or at equilibrium.
What do you know about resonant frequencies?
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tande33
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(Original post by RogerOxon)
What do you know about resonant frequencies?
Ah not a lot, we have not done it a school, but I know its like what the spring or systems likes to oscillate at. Do I need to know about them...
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RogerOxon
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(Original post by tande33)
Ah not a lot, we have not done it a school, but I know its like what the spring or systems likes to oscillate at. Do I need to know about them...
Yes. There will be one (or more) frequencies that tickle (a technical term ) the system in just the right way for the amplitude of oscillation to significantly increase. Damping will reduce both that frequency, and the amplitude of oscillation.

Here's some simple background.
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tande33
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(Original post by RogerOxon)
Yes. There will be one (or more) frequencies that tickle (a technical term ) the system in just the right way for the amplitude of oscillation to significantly increase. Damping will reduce both that frequency, and the amplitude of oscillation.

Here's some simple background.
Ok, so I have had a look at that and some videos, and the peak on the graph occurs when the driving force's frequency is equal to the natural frequency of the system. When Damping, the amplitude is reduced. The greater the damping the smaller the amplitude.

Is this ^^ correct?
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RogerOxon
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(Original post by tande33)
Ok, so I have had a look at that and some videos, and the peak on the graph occurs when the driving force's frequency is equal to the natural frequency of the system. When Damping, the amplitude is reduced. The greater the damping the smaller the amplitude.

Is this ^^ correct?
Yes. So, which graph shows the lightest damping?
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tande33
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B, as it has the greatest amplitude and has a maximum, not a minimum?
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