MuddledRose
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#1
Report Thread starter 7 months ago
#1
Hi everyone (or even just someone!)
I am hoping that someone can help me with their experiences of Teach First.
I'm looking to apply for the 2022 cohort as a mature applicant (I'll be 30). I can only apply for the EYFS route due to my degree.
I would love to hear people's experiences- good, bad, mixed... the lot!
Also if anyone's an ambassador I could talk to directly that would be great.
Thanks in advance!
1
reply
bluebeetle
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#2
Report 7 months ago
#2
I had a friend at uni who was a Teach First ambassador. She did lots of stuff to promote Teach First and she went to careers fairs and stuff, even though she'd not actually done the programme yet! She ended up doing it and had a really horrible time, her placement school was far away from where she had wanted to be placed and there was very little support from the actual school when she struggled.

I've also heard from people who enjoyed the experience, but it seems very risky. The only reason I can see for doing it is if you can't afford any other teacher training route, or if you want to leave teaching afterwards. I've heard a lot of people saying they like the idea of being in school most of the time, but in that case, you can just do a SCITT or School Direct course, surely?
1
reply
MuddledRose
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#3
Report Thread starter 7 months ago
#3
(Original post by bluebeetle)
I had a friend at uni who was a Teach First ambassador. She did lots of stuff to promote Teach First and she went to careers fairs and stuff, even though she'd not actually done the programme yet! She ended up doing it and had a really horrible time, her placement school was far away from where she had wanted to be placed and there was very little support from the actual school when she struggled.

I've also heard from people who enjoyed the experience, but it seems very risky. The only reason I can see for doing it is if you can't afford any other teacher training route, or if you want to leave teaching afterwards. I've heard a lot of people saying they like the idea of being in school most of the time, but in that case, you can just do a SCITT or School Direct course, surely?
Hi bluebeetle,

Thanks for your reply! I really appreciate your input.

I've actually been researching school direct and it appears that I could apply. I would need to go the salaried route whatever I decide to do because unfortunately with my partner working in a supermarket whilst studying law I would struggle to survive on just a maintenance loan from SFE if I was to do a PGCE. Sigh. And my subject is not subject to a bursary.
I'm not sure what SCITT is though... I'll take a look now :-)
0
reply
bluebeetle
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#4
Report 7 months ago
#4
(Original post by MuddledRose)
Hi bluebeetle,

Thanks for your reply! I really appreciate your input.

I've actually been researching school direct and it appears that I could apply. I would need to go the salaried route whatever I decide to do because unfortunately with my partner working in a supermarket whilst studying law I would struggle to survive on just a maintenance loan from SFE if I was to do a PGCE. Sigh. And my subject is not subject to a bursary.
I'm not sure what SCITT is though... I'll take a look now :-)
I don't know much about the salaried school direct route, but my understanding is you need a certain amount of years in industry to qualify.

I think if money is an issue and a salaried school direct route isn't an option, Teach First may be the only way! If you do go that route, stand strong on your subject preference. I've heard of candidates being told they can't train in primary but because they have a very old qualification in maths they could train as a maths teacher and then transfer, but that's all a bit baloney I think, you shouldn't train in a subject you don't want to teach. Just be prepared for shenanigans in general, it seems!
0
reply
MuddledRose
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#5
Report Thread starter 7 months ago
#5
(Original post by bluebeetle)
I don't know much about the salaried school direct route, but my understanding is you need a certain amount of years in industry to qualify.

I think if money is an issue and a salaried school direct route isn't an option, Teach First may be the only way! If you do go that route, stand strong on your subject preference. I've heard of candidates being told they can't train in primary but because they have a very old qualification in maths they could train as a maths teacher and then transfer, but that's all a bit baloney I think, you shouldn't train in a subject you don't want to teach. Just be prepared for shenanigans in general, it seems!
Bluebeetle, work experience wise, I worked in a children's nursery for two years and I'm volunteering to be an English GCSE tutor for a disadvantaged young person so hopefully that might stand me in good stead. I'm in retail at the minute though.

I'm just reading up on teach first now... I'm finding some very informative experiences! Seems very much a mixed bag.
Last edited by MuddledRose; 7 months ago
0
reply
MuddledRose
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#6
Report Thread starter 7 months ago
#6
The thing is being 30 in 2022 academic year... I'm going to be up against younger graduates. I'm just hoping I'll be valued as highly.
0
reply
bluebeetle
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#7
Report 7 months ago
#7
(Original post by MuddledRose)
The thing is being 30 in 2022 academic year... I'm going to be up against younger graduates. I'm just hoping I'll be valued as highly.
I'm not sure exactly how salaried school direct works, honestly, so I'm not sure if the work you've done would make you applicable. You can always contact GetIntoTeaching who are really fantastic at advising on those sorts of specifics.

As for worrying about being older, I really think it can be a benefit. I was straight out of uni when I trained, but I'd say about a quarter of the people on my course were in their 30s, and I think they found certain parts of the training easier just due to having more life experience and general resilience! I definitely don't think they were treated any differently to the fresh graduates on the course, and it sounds like you have more experience you can bring to the table, which will serve you well I'm sure.
0
reply
MuddledRose
Badges: 5
Rep:
?
#8
Report Thread starter 7 months ago
#8
(Original post by bluebeetle)
I'm not sure exactly how salaried school direct works, honestly, so I'm not sure if the work you've done would make you applicable. You can always contact GetIntoTeaching who are really fantastic at advising on those sorts of specifics.

As for worrying about being older, I really think it can be a benefit. I was straight out of uni when I trained, but I'd say about a quarter of the people on my course were in their 30s, and I think they found certain parts of the training easier just due to having more life experience and general resilience! I definitely don't think they were treated any differently to the fresh graduates on the course, and it sounds like you have more experience you can bring to the table, which will serve you well I'm sure.
Hi again bluebeetle,

I think I'll chat to get into teaching and see what they say. Thank you for that

I mean its possible by 2022 that the maintenance loan for the PGCE is high enough to live off alone if it rises every year, but I'm doubtful to be honest.
0
reply
mrsclonky
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#9
Report 2 weeks ago
#9
Hi MuddledRose I'm in the same position as you. I am now 30, looking to move awaybfrom 1:1 ta support into the role of teacher in the 2022 cohort. Like you, I need to keep a salary in order to afford to do it and financially support my family. Its a difficult one though as I have heard mixed reviews too, but it is the only option I think I've got. I phoned teach first and they said to get my application for 2022 off early, as soon as the 2022 applications open, as they may try to get me to train in secondary English instead as that is what my degree is in. However, the ambassador also said if I am early enough it will be easier to get onto my preferred course in my preferred location as the places get filled as and when the applications arrive. The level of support I have heard some people have recieved bothers me, but I know it is what I want and the end goal will be worth it. I am very determined to do this and I am hoping my own resilience will get me through the challenges. I have been in several school settings so know that some days are difficult and no day is the same, and hoping my support network will be enough. It is a big decision though isn't it!! Have you signed up to a Train to To Teach online event? I've signed onto one for next week, so hoping it will help give me lots of information!
0
reply
Muttley79
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#10
Report 2 weeks ago
#10
(Original post by mrsclonky)
Hi MuddledRose I'm in the same position as you. I am now 30, looking to move awaybfrom 1:1 ta support into the role of teacher in the 2022 cohort. Like you, I need to keep a salary in order to afford to do it and financially support my family. Its a difficult one though as I have heard mixed reviews too, but it is the only option I think I've got. I phoned teach first and they said to get my application for 2022 off early, as soon as the 2022 applications open, as they may try to get me to train in secondary English instead as that is what my degree is in. However, the ambassador also said if I am early enough it will be easier to get onto my preferred course in my preferred location as the places get filled as and when the applications arrive. The level of support I have heard some people have recieved bothers me, but I know it is what I want and the end goal will be worth it. I am very determined to do this and I am hoping my own resilience will get me through the challenges. I have been in several school settings so know that some days are difficult and no day is the same, and hoping my support network will be enough. It is a big decision though isn't it!! Have you signed up to a Train to To Teach online event? I've signed onto one for next week, so hoping it will help give me lots of information!
DO NOT touch Teach Frst - there are other salaried routes and it's very poor prep for the classroom.
0
reply
mrsclonky
Badges: 1
Rep:
?
#11
Report 2 weeks ago
#11
(Original post by Muttley79)
DO NOT touch Teach First - there are other salaried routes and it's very poor prep for the classroom.
But what I want to know is why you say that. I'm not trying to provoke anything, I genuinely want to know the reasons why you don't like it as I like to make up my own mind based on things I hear and experiences. I've heard that other salaried routes are near impossible to get on to (maybe 1 or 2 students in an area each year) and so felt that TF could be a viable alternative.
0
reply
Muttley79
Badges: 20
Rep:
?
#12
Report 2 weeks ago
#12
(Original post by mrsclonky)
But what I want to know is why you say that. I'm not trying to provoke anything, I genuinely want to know the reasons why you don't like it as I like to make up my own mind based on things I hear and experiences. I've heard that other salaried routes are near impossible to get on to (maybe 1 or 2 students in an area each year) and so felt that TF could be a viable alternative.
You are thrown into the classroom from day one - you should be super-numerary in a good teaching training placement.

The whole basis of the scheme is to teach for a couple of years and then go on to a 'proper' job - that isn't a great basis to enter the profession is it? The actual support is poor from what I've seen of trainees and I've been asked to support a number of teahers failed by TF.
0
reply
KellyW1989
Badges: 3
Rep:
?
#13
Report 2 days ago
#13
(Original post by mrsclonky)
But what I want to know is why you say that. I'm not trying to provoke anything, I genuinely want to know the reasons why you don't like it as I like to make up my own mind based on things I hear and experiences. I've heard that other salaried routes are near impossible to get on to (maybe 1 or 2 students in an area each year) and so felt that TF could be a viable alternative.
Hi, I'm starting as part of 2021 cohort in Primary. From day one you are on an 80% timetable and have your own class, so very much thrown in at the deep end. You are also with one school who you do not get to choose for 2 years. For me teach first is the ideal route as I have alot of experience in schools and am often put in front of a class and have to think on my feet 😆 But I imagine for applicants with no teaching experience this route will be very difficult for them.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Would you consider Adjustment if your grades were higher than you expected?

Yes, I'd look at higher ranking universities than my current choices (171)
41.71%
Yes, I'd look for a course or uni that is a better fit for me (61)
14.88%
No, I'd stick with my current uni choice (170)
41.46%
Something else (let us know in the thread below!) (8)
1.95%

Watched Threads

View All