Zev123
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Hi
I am looking to study either maths and philosophy or physics and philosophy in university and was wondering if someone can give advice? The Leeds course looks really interesting, and obviously it would be amazing to go to Oxford but the Oxford course just doesn't look so interesting to me? Has anyone on here studied either of those course there (or anywhere else tbh) and be willing to tell me a bit about it?

Thanks so much
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turna127
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I'm only in year 12 but I'm applying for physphil and petrolhead008, who studied it at Oxford, has several posts about it that I found really helpful! Check these out in particular or you could ask them directly if they're online anyway

https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=6577566
https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=5598190
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Zev123
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(Original post by turna127)
I'm only in year 12 but I'm applying for physphil and petrolhead008, who studied it at Oxford, has several posts about it that I found really helpful! Check these out in particular or you could ask them directly if they're online anyway

https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=6577566
https://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/sho....php?t=5598190
Thanks so much, really appreciate it😁
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petrolhead008
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hey yeah would be happy to answer any questions if you had any!
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Zev123
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(Original post by petrolhead008)
hey yeah would be happy to answer any questions if you had any!

Hey, thanks so much. I was wondering if you could tell me a bit about the course and the modules within it? Also, do you know much about the maths/physics and philosophy courses at other unis? Thanks so much, really appriciate it.
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petrolhead008
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(Original post by Zev123)
Hey, thanks so much. I was wondering if you could tell me a bit about the course and the modules within it? Also, do you know much about the maths/physics and philosophy courses at other unis? Thanks so much, really appriciate it.
Sure! I've answered this before elsewhere so I'll just copy my answer here.




  • Year 1: on the physics side the modules you do are called CP1, CP3 and CP4. CP1 looks at classical mechanics and special relativity. CP3 and CP4 are both maths modules, and you cover a load of topics including calculus, vector calculus, linear algebra, complex numbers, ordinary differential equations and waves. On the philosophy side you study two modules: Elements of Deductive Logic (which is about logic) and General Philosophy. In the General Philosophy paper you study a wide range of topics including knowledge, scepticism, free will and the mind-body problem. You also have your first taste of the philosophy of physics when you look at the Leibniz-Clarke Correspondence, which is essentially a debate about the philosophy of space and time.
  • Year 2: on the physics side the modules you do are called A1, A2P and A3. A1 includes thermodynamics, kinetic theory and statistical mechanics. A2P is an introduction to electromagnetism. A3 is quantum mechanics. You also have more maths lectures, mainly on partial differential equations, Fourier series and Fourier transforms, but you do other things as well. On the philosophy side the course spans across Year 2 and Year 3 and you study three modules: (a) either Knowledge and Reality or Early Modern Philosophy (essentially a choice between contemporary philosophical issues about the nature of knowledge and reality or a more historical look at philosophical issues focusing on the writers Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley and Hume) (b) the philosophy of science (c) the philosophy of physics, which focuses on the philosophy of special relativity and the philosophy of quantum mechanics.
  • Year 3: here you get to choose to do either more physics or more philosophy. The physics papers you can choose from are B1 (fluid dynamics), B2 (symmetry and relativity), B3 (atomic and laser physics), B4 (particle physics), B5 (general relativity), B6 (condensed matter physics), B7 (advanced classical mechanics), B8 (experimental project), B9 (computational project). If you choose to do more physics you pick 4 of these; if you choose to do more philosophy you pick 2 of these. On the philosophy side you continue with the three modules you started in second year. If you choose to do more philosophy you pick one more philosophy module to study. There's a lot of choice here, look here if you're interested.
  • Year 4: you get to specialise entirely in physics, or entirely in philosophy, or a mix of both. I won't list the details here.

I'm afraid I don't know much about courses at other unis. Bristol was always my second choice as I think their course is quite good. Hope this helps!
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danielryre
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(Original post by Zev123)
Hi
I am looking to study either maths and philosophy or physics and philosophy in university and was wondering if someone can give advice? The Leeds course looks really interesting, and obviously it would be amazing to go to Oxford but the Oxford course just doesn't look so interesting to me? Has anyone on here studied either of those course there (or anywhere else tbh) and be willing to tell me a bit about it?

Thanks so much
You could either do Physics and Maths or Math with Physics vice versa. Do not do it with Philosophy. You will get a hard time finding a job later on.
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petrolhead008
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(Original post by danielryre)
You could either do Physics and Maths or Math with Physics vice versa. Do not do it with Philosophy. You will get a hard time finding a job later on.
This is complete rubbish: you clearly don't know what you're on about. You will be absolutely fine finding a job with whichever course. The key is to apply for something which YOU want to do.
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danielryre
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(Original post by petrolhead008)
This is complete rubbish: you clearly don't know what you're on about. You will be absolutely fine finding a job with whichever course. The key is to apply for something which YOU want to do.
Yes I do. I am more qualified to answer this question becase I have seen employers do not want to hire applicants with philosophy degree!
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petrolhead008
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(Original post by danielryre)
Yes I do. I am more qualified to answer this question becase I have seen employers do not want to hire applicants with philosophy degree!
Doing a maths or physics degree WITH philosophy makes you, if anything, MORE attractive to a huge range of employers because you demonstrate that you can not only solve mathematical problems but you also have the ability to form logical arguments, write essays, read widely and so on. It really does depend in what sector you're based in: of course doing a philosophy degree isn't going to be directly helpful if you want to become an experimental physicist or a data scientist, but for a huge range of jobs it can be very helpful to have some sort of experience at writing essays at a university level. In terms of statistics at Oxford, 88% of physics students are in work or doing further study six months after graduating. This is compared to 80% of physics and philosophy students and 90% of maths students.

There is a common misconception that doing a philosophy degree makes you very unemployable when this is simply not true: there are lots of jobs available which value the transferrable skills a philosophy degree offers such as the public sector (including civil and diplomatic services), journalism, communications and even finance. (I know many people who have done degrees like History or English and have ended up in a bank.)

I repeat again: the key is to study at university what YOU want to study, and don't people try and put you off by saying you won't get a job out of it. The odds are they simply don't understand what employers are looking for: a lot of the time it's not the specific degree that you do but the transferrable skills you learn along the way that are valuable.
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RichE
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(Original post by petrolhead008)
This is complete rubbish: you clearly don't know what you're on about. You will be absolutely fine finding a job with whichever course. The key is to apply for something which YOU want to do.
Totally agree - and this is based on teaching Maths & Philosophy students, and Maths students over 25 years.
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