5 benefits of working in Software Development

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xSkyFire
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I was studying for the CFA, whilst in a top tier financial data firm. I've also worked in various other professions which had aspects that I accepted as "part of the job" but disliked e.g. excessive work hours.

I'm a Software Developer nowadays, so I decided to highlight 5 benefits (there are way more than 5) I've found working in the profession, compared to most other professions. My main regret is not getting into the industry earlier:

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Ali12121
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Trust me, this field isn't as glamorous as everyone makes it seem. It's overrated and very saturated with unskilled workers. Also, do you really plan to glue your head to a screen for your entire career? It pays well for a reason and that's because many end up leaving the field. Always remember that when making career decisions. Ask yourself why a career pays well in the first place if it seems to be like such an easy task to code...
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xSkyFire
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(Original post by Ali12121)
Trust me, this field isn't as glamorous as everyone makes it seem. It's overrated and very saturated with unskilled workers. Also, do you really plan to glue your head to a screen for your entire career? It pays well for a reason and that's because many end up leaving the field. Always remember that when making career decisions. Ask yourself why a career pays well in the first place if it seems to be like such an easy task to code...
I didn't actually discuss pay, however there is actually a shortage of developers (supply and demand), which is why salaries are in the upper quartile. It sounds like your main argument against it is that it's difficult to code (hence why you believe many are "unskilled")? That is really subjective and is honestly an iterative process. If a worker is unskilled, that's a failing on the HR department for hiring them in the first place, not a failing on the person for being placed in a position they're inadequately equipped for.
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Ali12121
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(Original post by xSkyFire)
I didn't actually discuss pay, however there is actually a shortage of developers (supply and demand), which is why salaries are in the upper quartile. It sounds like your main argument against it is that it's difficult to code (hence why you believe many are "unskilled")? That is really subjective and is honestly an iterative process. If a worker is unskilled, that's a failing on the HR department for hiring them in the first place, not a failing on the person for being placed in a position they're inadequately equipped for.
The reason there's many open positions for software engineering is because many are easily replaced all the time, and most aren't roles that you would stay in for more than a few months. Of course this is common in the software engineering realm, but it's something to consider. It's a field that does not require you to stand out among the herd, unless you're applying to places like Google or Facebook, which are only reserved for those who are highly educated. And then again, these places usually have high turnover rates because of how stressful they are - again, they pay well for a reason. Software Engineering really is a overrated field unfortunately and many go into it, assuming they'll stand out with their "coding" skills which frankly everyone is learning nowadays. Let's not forget that automation will take over most of these roles in a few years time, and most fields that are usually hyped about in a set period of time are typically saturated a few years later, like software.
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xSkyFire
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(Original post by Ali12121)
The reason there's many open positions for software engineering is because many are easily replaced all the time, and most aren't roles that you would stay in for more than a few months. Of course this is common in the software engineering realm, but it's something to consider. It's a field that does not require you to stand out among the herd, unless you're applying to places like Google or Facebook, which are only reserved for those who are highly educated. And then again, these places usually have high turnover rates because of how stressful they are - again, they pay well for a reason. Software Engineering really is a overrated field unfortunately and many go into it, assuming they'll stand out with their "coding" skills which frankly everyone is learning nowadays. Let's not forget that automation will take over most of these roles in a few years time, and most fields that are usually hyped about in a set period of time are typically saturated a few years later, like software.
Sounds to me like you don't actually have experience working within the profession? Correct me if I'm wrong?
1. Average turnover time is 1.5 years for a Software Developer.
2. I've interviewed graduates in previous roles and have gone through the same process myself, recruitment processes are dependent on the company *not* the profession, as with everything you'll see good practice and bad practice with recruitment.
3. Google and Facebook are two examples where formal education is far less important. This *again* is a recruitment issue, as FANG companies are some of the first SPX firms to drop the "degree requirement" and opt for a holistic approach of accepting candidates based on relevant skills/experience. Contributing to open source projects is taken in higher regards.
4. The main effect of automation for software developers has been in regards to CI/CD and development of logic apps such as what you might find in Azure. All that did is merge in the role of DevOps whilst imparting some basic 'no-code' development onto those without technical skills.
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Mike Harriot
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(Original post by Ali12121)
I don't have experience? Can you not make stupid generalisations like these again because they're embarrassing. You seem like an insecure idiot who isn't even sure if they made the right decision going into the software engineering world. I graduated with a First Class in Computer Science a year ago, and this is not only my experience but my peers as well. So before you make dumb comments again, remember that you're the one posting on here who clearly lacks experience of such a mundane field, which frankly many like me regret going into.
Using insults doesn't really help your case.
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Ali12121
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(Original post by Mike Harriot)
Using insults doesn't really help your case.
I don't really have a case. I'm simply explaining to those who live a delusional lifestyle.
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Mike Harriot
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(Original post by Ali12121)
I don't really have a case. I'm simply explaining to those who live a delusional lifestyle.
Not everyone has the same experience as you. Pull your head out of your backside.
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Ali12121
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(Original post by Mike Harriot)
Not everyone has the same experience as you. Pull your head out of your backside.
If you're a depressed boy who wants to glue their head to a screen without a sense of helping the world, for the rest of your career, then by all means do so. But don't come to me when you're in your death bed, begging me to reverse your time because you were arrogant enough to put delusions before reality.
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Mike Harriot
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(Original post by Ali12121)
If you're a depressed boy who wants to glue their head to a screen without a sense of helping the world, for the rest of your career, then by all means do so. But don't come to me when you're in your death bed, begging me to reverse your time because you were arrogant enough to put delusions before reality.
Most professions nowadays require you to be using a computer most of the time, and it's only going to increase. And I'm pretty sure those who work in the tech field are progressing the world the most by far. The same "death bed" argument can be made for any job you don't like, but it's irrelevant if you like the job, which OP does.
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xSkyFire
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(Original post by Ali12121)
I don't have experience? Can you not make stupid generalisations like these again because they're embarrassing. You seem like an insecure idiot who isn't even sure if they made the right decision going into the software engineering world. I graduated with a First Class in Computer Science a year ago, and this is not only my experience but my peers as well. So before you make dumb comments again, remember that you're the one posting on here who clearly lacks experience of such a mundane field, which frankly many like me regret going into.
Ad hominem - I asked you to correct me if I was wrong? I don't have a degree in CompSci, I'm pretty much self-taught, but a degree really isn't representative of a profession.
Like I said I've been working for quite a few years (7 years now), I've worked in various professions and I'm not saying there aren't certain cons but I'm simply highlighting benefits based off of a general consensus in relation to other professions.
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Mike Harriot
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(Original post by Ali12121)
Glad it ain't up your mums because she doesn't clean down there.
The true intentions come out. I'm done humouring you. Clean up your house.
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Ali12121
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(Original post by Mike Harriot)
Most professions nowadays require you to be using a computer most of the time, and it's only going to increase. And I'm pretty sure those who work in the tech field are progressing the world the most by far. The same "death bed" argument can be made for any job you don't like, but it's irrelevant if you like the job, which OP does.
That's more of a reason to stand out and specialise in something specific like finance, robotics or the medical field while encorporating computer science. For instance, FinTech is a booming field in today's climate. It's much more secure to do so than to focus on coding and your CS experience at a bachelor's level that are likely to be replaced in a few years time. You've just got to be smart and do it your own way rather than follow the herd that continously promotes "software engineering" - ask yourself, what is wrong with that route.
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xSkyFire
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(Original post by Ali12121)
Formal education is less important at Google? LOL. You're definitely new to this field you bin bag.
I literally stated I've interviewed graduates for positions - I know how the process works. A degree has little to no relevance on someone's ability to be productive in a work environment and little to no relevance on the profitability of a company. All it shows is you can study for an exam, whereas assessing someone with tangible experience or how they perform e.g. paired programming, is far more useful. The big 4, in addition to the FANG and many SPX companies have dropped degree requirements entirely. In fact Google themselves have just released degree alternatives for positions, which are short 6 month courses designed to get you the directly applicable skills you need for a specific profession. University and degrees are not as relevant nowadays with so many more avenues to a profession, which are far more effective. Coding bootcamps have already shown to be more successful and effective than going down a CompSci route for someone who wants to become a Software Dev.
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username5383500
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(Original post by Ali12121)
Glad it ain't up your mums because she doesn't clean down there.
(Original post by Ali12121)
You seem like an insecure idiot who isn't even sure if they made the right decision going into the software engineering world.
While I do agree that to an extent there is an overabundance of low skilled programmers as a result of highly subscribed CompSci degrees, statements like this would make anyone question if you're actually old enough to be speaking with experience.

It's fine to disagree and have a debate, but childish insults contribute nothing. Stick to using facts and references rather than trying to attack someone's character.
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Ali12121
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(Original post by xSkyFire)
I literally stated I've interviewed graduates for positions - I know how the process works. A degree has little to no relevance on someone's ability to be productive in a work environment and little to no relevance on the profitability of a company. All it shows is you can study for an exam, whereas assessing someone with tangible experience or how they perform e.g. paired programming, is far more useful. The big 4, in addition to the FANG and many SPX companies have dropped degree requirements entirely. In fact Google themselves have just released degree alternatives for positions, which are short 6 month courses designed to get you the directly applicable skills you need for a specific profession. University and degrees are as relevant nowadays with so many more avenues to a profession, which are far more effective. Coding bootcamps have already shown to be more successful and effective than going down a CompSci route for someone who wants to become a Software Dev.
Coding bootcamps? hahahaha, you're definitely inexperienced in this field. Most of those who go down that route end up in poorly structured and poorly paid work. Actually, a degree definitely matters if you want a professional job and not a bottom tier one. It doesn't only teach you to prepare for an exam if you take CS and the fact you said that tells me how stupid you are for this profession. There are many things that CS students can offer and software engineering isn't just about coding, so the fact you have such a narrow mind already tells me how useless you are to this field. Do you actually believe all it takes is a bit of coding skills to prevent yourself from automation? God, you really are one of those lost sheeps who bought into this coding lie.
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