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MSc Psychology Conversion Distance Learning

Hi,

Has anyone actually done / doing a distance learning MSc Psych conversion?

I’m thinking of doing it at Birmingham City University this upcoming academic year but am just a little concerned about doing it ’distancedly’ and wondered how everyone else coped?
Original post by Dadmanz
Hi,

Has anyone actually done / doing a distance learning MSc Psych conversion?

I’m thinking of doing it at Birmingham City University this upcoming academic year but am just a little concerned about doing it ’distancedly’ and wondered how everyone else coped?

Hi Dadmanz

I haven't started yet but I have a place on the same course at the same university starting in September. I've not heard anything from the department yet but I hope to soon. I've followed a variety of accounts on Twitter too.

I'm not sure what to expect but plan to work hard alongside my full time teaching job. I think I'd like to either teach Psychology but I'm erring more towards the clinical side. What makes you want to do the course?
Hi @Dadmanz,

2 of our students, @Abigail R Brown and @ChaddVinyl, study their MSc Psychology course via distance learning as standard so hopefully they will be able to give you some tips!

Thanks,
Amy
Original post by Dadmanz
Hi,

Has anyone actually done / doing a distance learning MSc Psych conversion?

I’m thinking of doing it at Birmingham City University this upcoming academic year but am just a little concerned about doing it ’distancedly’ and wondered how everyone else coped?

Hey @Dadmanz I am currently doing a distance learning MSc Psychology at Arden University, It was a new concept for me to when I started as I had never really considered it as an option before until I started researching into a career change and doing something other than just working to fill my time.

I must admit I personally love it. It was hard a first to get used to studying whilst working and getting a routine in place, and making sure you felt connected with those on your course and not alone - however I am enjoying it so much more than my undergrad at a 'red brick' university.

It's not always easy, especially if life gets too busy however all of our live lectures (Adobe connect sessions) get recorded so if we miss one can re watch them back when we have time, and the lecturers are just an email away. There are discussion forums where you can meet the other students on your module virtually, and ask questions, share ideas etc too.

I find I am less distracted than I would be if I was in a lecture hall, and because the material is in front of me I can go over it at my own pace and revise it where necessary. The conversion course itself covers such a wide range of topics which makes it interesting and helps you decide on what you want to do after.

I hope that is helpful?

Abigail
Arden Student Ambassador
@Dadmanz

Hello! I'm currently doing my MSc Psychology conversion whilst teaching full time - have you considered talking to your department at work and logging the MSc as part of your 30 hours CPD requirement? This may allow you extra time to work on it during school hours. I did this with a post graduate diploma many years ago.

If you are new to Psychology I think doing an MSc in Psychology first is the way forward, before trying to dive into the clinical side. The MSc has given me an enormous amount of knowledge of the fundamental building blocks of the field. There is always the option after the MSc to go and explore Clinical Psychology (you need a doctorate to be labelled as any form of 'Psychologist'). I am personally considering Educational Psychology, which appears to have a lot of employment opportunities at the moment, and will be a big advantage for you at your school / college
Original post by ChaddVinyl
@Dadmanz

Hello! I'm currently doing my MSc Psychology conversion whilst teaching full time - have you considered talking to your department at work and logging the MSc as part of your 30 hours CPD requirement? This may allow you extra time to work on it during school hours. I did this with a post graduate diploma many years ago.

If you are new to Psychology I think doing an MSc in Psychology first is the way forward, before trying to dive into the clinical side. The MSc has given me an enormous amount of knowledge of the fundamental building blocks of the field. There is always the option after the MSc to go and explore Clinical Psychology (you need a doctorate to be labelled as any form of 'Psychologist'). I am personally considering Educational Psychology, which appears to have a lot of employment opportunities at the moment, and will be a big advantage for you at your school / college


Hi ChaddVinyl,

Is there any additional available for the course work requirements, essays etc. I would like to know more. word counts, time frames, delivery etc.

Thanks

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