Eat Out To Help Out Ends - Sunak's Legacy

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Burridge
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#21
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#21
(Original post by Gundabad(good))
No one knows. But he must maintain his popularity for the next four years.
I'll tell you - no they won't. People love it when the government is giving away money but hate it when they try and claw it back in. Sunak doesn't need to maintain popularity over the next four years - rarely does the Chancellor enjoy any popularity!
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L i b
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(Original post by barnetlad)
Wanting to avoid it encouraging obesity, and particularly wanting to support local businesses where the income goes and more is spent locally. The two were examples.
OK, to look at both of those points in turn:

I went to a French bistro on one of the first nights. I imagine I consumed rather more than the calorie content of a Big Mac meal there, once everything was factored in. You really ought to have seen the dessert. McDonalds and fast-food chains are not the only ones who produce food with a high calorie content. Given that most pubs now sell probably larger portioned burger 'meals' than McDonalds do, I think you'd probably have to exclude most providers on this basis.

On your second point, McDonalds is a franchise. These are small businesses, often owned locally. Sure, they pay a franchising fee and so on - but if you want to get to that level, most restaurants will pay for branding, advertising etc from sources that aren't particularly "local" to them. In any case, it's more of a small business operation than a tied pub attached to a national PubCo - and of course, just like any other restaurant, they are large local employers - and maintaining jobs was really the main point of Eat Out to Help Out.
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L i b
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(Original post by ByEeek)
Agreed. But the irony of the whole thing is that he has achieved his popularity by effectively running a Corbyn Labour style policy. In fact, it seems that the Tories, far from being conserving have implemented much of Corbyns manifesto. The railways are more or less entirely subsidised by the government, health and education has seen a massive boost in funding and the government have now been propping up private food outlets. It is just so bizarre.
Supporting employers during a time of national crisis isn't a particularly Corbynite policy. To be truly Corbynite, he'd have had to have nationalised the restaurants and sacked any members of staff that looked a bit Jewish.
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Gundabad(good)
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#24
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#24
(Original post by Burridge)
I'll tell you - no they won't. People love it when the government is giving away money but hate it when they try and claw it back in. Sunak doesn't need to maintain popularity over the next four years - rarely does the Chancellor enjoy any popularity!
Hopefully, Boris will ruin his popularity so much that senior Tory leadership will replace him with Sunak.
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thuv
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It was a good scheme but all the schemes were layed out in a messed up order.
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AW_1983
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(Original post by Gundabad(good))
A great scheme has now ended. May Chancellor Rishi Sunak come up with more.
For someone with a deeply anhedonic attitude to post-Brexit Britain, I absolutely loved Eat Out to Help Out. From a broader perspective it was a stupid idea of course; save a few pubs by encouraging everyone out to share their COVID germs with one another at an enormous cost down the line when a new lockdown has to be imposed.

However, I happily used it several times because I like cheap food and I'm far beyond caring what happens to the people around me, who probably voted for Brexit anyway.
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Rakas21
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(Original post by AW_1983)
For someone with a deeply anhedonic attitude to post-Brexit Britain, I absolutely loved Eat Out to Help Out. From a broader perspective it was a stupid idea of course; save a few pubs by encouraging everyone out to share their COVID germs with one another at an enormous cost down the line when a new lockdown has to be imposed.

However, I happily used it several times because I like cheap food and I'm far beyond caring what happens to the people around me, who probably voted for Brexit anyway.
I'm not really sure that restaurants were as much to blame as the reopening of pubs and bars and general lapses in enforcement of social distancing (notice that when masks came in supermarkets stopped spaced queing and customer limits at any one time).

The scheme itself at only ~£500m was a fantastic success (i must admit, i expected it to flop) and generated far more economic activity than it cost.
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AW_1983
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(Original post by Rakas21)
I'm not really sure that restaurants were as much to blame as the reopening of pubs and bars and general lapses in enforcement of social distancing (notice that when masks came in supermarkets stopped spaced queing and customer limits at any one time).

The scheme itself at only ~£500m was a fantastic success (i must admit, i expected it to flop) and generated far more economic activity than it cost.
The point you raise about masks is a good one. When we didn't have to wear them, it was great because the elderly started getting out of the effing way in the supermarket by no longer chatting in the doorway, chatting in the aisles and generally taking their time. Now that we're wearing masks they've gone back to getting in my effing way.

However, your point about cost can't be measured yet. We don't know how many more people got COVID from a pub or restaurant and passed it on to a vulnerable person. Each case will come with a cost for treatment.
Last edited by AW_1983; 2 weeks ago
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