Psychologist through MSc Psychology (Conversion)

Watch this thread
NowhereMan.111
Badges: 8
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
Hope this reaches to you in good health!
I am an Indian national and currently in my final year of law. I am planning to opt for MSc Psychology (Conversion) after graduation. I would like to know the practical aspects of the same.
I am focusing on the programme to get a BPS certified degree in order to apply for PhD but I am unable to grasp its ground reality. So as a non-UK national, I wish to work as a clinical psychologist, preferably at NHS. I have researched a bit about the process and I know that after MSc I'll be needing a minimum 12 months of experience in order to apply for a PhD and only after completing the PhD, I can independently practise clinical psychology.
I would like to know how difficult is it for a Non-UK National (Indian) to get work experience just after MSc (Conversion) as an Assistant Psychologist at NHS or if not NHS then where if so? I mean, what are the prospects after MSc Psychology (Conversion) that are feasible?

Moreover, how hard is it to get into a PhD course after graduating with MSc Conversion degree. Does the "conversion" impact in the selection process?


Also, it will be of immense help if someone would give their opinion on the colleges which I should aim for. I have already noted some of them which are not too costly considering that I have already spent 5 years in a law degree.
Leeds Trinity University
University of Stirling
University of Greenwich
University of Chester
University of Bolton
University of West London
University of East London
Bucks New University
Middlesex University London
University of Bedfordshire
Liverpool Hope University
St. Andrews ( I am really interested but I am not able to consider it as viable option owing to the tuition fee as it is twice that of those mentioned above)

All these universities, the concerned MSc course are more or less of similar tuition fee for an international student. Which ones should be my preference?


The entire point of the query is to know whether is it too far-fetched an idea for an Indian having a law degree to find his way through in order to practice clinical psychology in the UK. What major problems will I be facing through and what all should be my priority concerns?


Thanking You In Anticipation
Last edited by NowhereMan.111; 1 year ago
1
reply
Shay_1998
Badges: 5
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#2
Report 1 year ago
#2
(Original post by NowhereMan.111)
Hope this reaches to you in good health!
I am an Indian national and currently in my final year of law. I am planning to opt for MSc Psychology (Conversion) after graduation. I would like to know the practical aspects of the same.
I am focusing on the programme to get a BPS certified degree in order to apply for PhD but I am unable to grasp its ground reality. So as a non-UK national, I wish to work as a clinical psychologist, preferably at NHS. I have researched a bit about the process and I know that after MSc I'll be needing a minimum 12 months of experience in order to apply for a PhD and only after completing the PhD, I can independently practise clinical psychology.
I would like to know how difficult is it for a Non-UK National (Indian) to get work experience just after MSc (Conversion) as an Assistant Psychologist at NHS or if not NHS then where if so? I mean, what are the prospects after MSc Psychology (Conversion) that are feasible?

Moreover, how hard is it to get into a PhD course after graduating with MSc Conversion degree. Does the "conversion" impact in the selection process?


Also, it will be of immense help if someone would give their opinion on the colleges which I should aim for. I have already noted some of them which are not too costly considering that I have already spent 5 years in a law degree.
Leeds Trinity University
University of Stirling
University of Greenwich
University of Chester
University of Bolton
University of West London
University of East London
Bucks New University
Middlesex University London
University of Bedfordshire
Liverpool Hope University
St. Andrews ( I am really interested but I am not able to consider it as viable option owing to the tuition fee as it is twice that of those mentioned above)

All these universities, the concerned MSc course are more or less of similar tuition fee for an international student. Which ones should be my preference?


The entire point of the query is to know whether is it too far-fetched an idea for an Indian having a law degree to find his way through in order to practice clinical psychology in the UK. What major problems will I be facing through and what all should be my priority concerns?


Thanking You In Anticipation
Great question I hope you get an answer soon!
0
reply
eduorclinpsych
Badges: 11
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#3
Report 1 year ago
#3
From my own research I'm pretty sure studying towards a PhD does not qualify you to practice as a Clinical Psychologist. Rather, you would need to apply to and undertake a three-year Doctorate in Clinical Psychology. The two are very different.

Assistant Psychologist jobs or any of a similar nature are notoriously difficult to access in the NHS. There's so much competition for these spots that many undertake experience/volunteering throughout their degree/conversion as (again, from my own research), BPS Graduate Basis for Membership is the bare minimum to start applying to these roles.

If you're really not sure where to go, I'd recommend looking at each university's module pages - will you be learning something you're truly interested in? If you still have quite a few to sort through then perhaps check out which institutions offer clinical experience/opportunities and/or also run the Doctorate programme. Which are engaging in research aligned to your own interests etc.?

I personally don't believe that being a non-UK national will disadvantage you in any way, but you ought to be aware of the massive competition for this path. If you have a background in Law and applied to the conversion then eventual Forensic Psychology Doctorate you might have more experience to put you ahead etc.

I'm by no means an expert and I have not yet gained BPS Graduate Basis for Membership so I hope someone more experienced also comments with their thoughts.
1
reply
Nerol
Badges: 21
Rep:
? You'll earn badges for being active around the site. Rep gems come when your posts are rated by other community members.
#4
Report 1 year ago
#4
(Original post by NowhereMan.111)
Hope this reaches to you in good health!
I am an Indian national and currently in my final year of law. I am planning to opt for MSc Psychology (Conversion) after graduation. I would like to know the practical aspects of the same.
I am focusing on the programme to get a BPS certified degree in order to apply for PhD but I am unable to grasp its ground reality. So as a non-UK national, I wish to work as a clinical psychologist, preferably at NHS. I have researched a bit about the process and I know that after MSc I'll be needing a minimum 12 months of experience in order to apply for a PhD and only after completing the PhD, I can independently practise clinical psychology.
I would like to know how difficult is it for a Non-UK National (Indian) to get work experience just after MSc (Conversion) as an Assistant Psychologist at NHS or if not NHS then where if so? I mean, what are the prospects after MSc Psychology (Conversion) that are feasible?

Moreover, how hard is it to get into a PhD course after graduating with MSc Conversion degree. Does the "conversion" impact in the selection process?


Also, it will be of immense help if someone would give their opinion on the colleges which I should aim for. I have already noted some of them which are not too costly considering that I have already spent 5 years in a law degree.
Leeds Trinity University
University of Stirling
University of Greenwich
University of Chester
University of Bolton
University of West London
University of East London
Bucks New University
Middlesex University London
University of Bedfordshire
Liverpool Hope University
St. Andrews ( I am really interested but I am not able to consider it as viable option owing to the tuition fee as it is twice that of those mentioned above)

All these universities, the concerned MSc course are more or less of similar tuition fee for an international student. Which ones should be my preference?


The entire point of the query is to know whether is it too far-fetched an idea for an Indian having a law degree to find his way through in order to practice clinical psychology in the UK. What major problems will I be facing through and what all should be my priority concerns?


Thanking You In Anticipation
Hi!

As mentioned above, clinical psychology is a hugely competitive field and it can be very difficult to get a place on a doctorate program.

Having a conversion degree and being an international student would not disadvantage you at all, you would be rated on the same criteria as anyone else applying. Experience seems to be the most important aspect and experience working alongside is seen by many as the gold standard, however it is not the ONLY experience that would be accepted as relevant.

Assistant psychologist roles are extremely competitive and you would likely need relevant experience before being offered an interview for one of these roles - for example, in mental health, helping roles, learning disabilities, research etc. I've had one interview for an AP role and it was intense! So if you ever are offered one, do your research! I did a LOT of research about what to expect and was glad I did. I felt prepared and the interview went OK, but I was not offered the job. Still, it was good experience!

Support work roles are quite easy to get into as a starting point, but these roles would not be good enough to put you in the running for a doctorate. Some people train as Psychological Wellbeing Practitioners and do that for a while before applying. Some go into research assistant roles. There's not one way to do it, but be prepared to have to re-apply several times just because of how many applicants there are each year!
2
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Has advance information helped during your exams?

Yes (132)
66.33%
No (45)
22.61%
I didn't use it to prepare (22)
11.06%

Watched Threads

View All