After Law, MSc Psychology (Conversion) [Clinical Psychologist]

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NowhereMan.111
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Hope this reaches to you in good health!
I am an Indian national and currently in my final year of law. I am planning to opt for MSc Psychology (Conversion) after graduation. I would like to know the practical aspects of the same.
I am focusing on the programme to get a BPS certified degree in order to apply for PhD but I am unable to grasp its ground reality. So as a non-UK national, I wish to work as a clinical psychologist, preferably at NHS. I have researched a bit about the process and I know that after MSc I'll be needing a minimum 12 months of experience in order to apply for a PhD and only after completing the PhD, I can independently practise clinical psychology.
I would like to know how difficult is it for a Non-UK National (Indian) to get work experience just after MSc (Conversion) as an Assistant Psychologist at NHS or if not NHS then where if so? I mean, what are the prospects after MSc Psychology (Conversion) that are feasible?

Moreover, how hard is it to get into a PhD course after graduating with MSc Conversion degree. Does the "conversion" impact in the selection process?


Also, it will be of immense help if someone would give their opinion on the colleges which I should aim for. I have already noted some of them which are not too costly considering that I have already spent 5 years in a law degree.
Leeds Trinity University
University of Stirling
University of Greenwich
University of Chester
University of Bolton
University of West London
University of East London
Bucks New University
Middlesex University London
University of Bedfordshire
Liverpool Hope University
St. Andrews ( I am really interested but I am not able to consider it as viable option owing to the tuition fee as it is twice that of those mentioned above)

All these universities, the concerned MSc course are more or less of similar tuition fee for an international student. Which ones should be my preference?


The entire point of the query is to know whether is it too far-fetched an idea for an Indian having a law degree to find his way through in order to practice clinical psychology in the UK. What major problems will I be facing through and what all should be my priority concerns?


Thanking You In Anticipation
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jeremzii
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hey there, im a recent Psych graduate from the UK

i would like to tell you now, that psychology is a very very competitive field. like its crazy. thats why im hoping to get out of the field, the path to a phd is just very unlikely for me, and would take like 7 to 10 years. some points:

- the conversion doesnt matter since its a course that brings you up to speed with psychology, the same way that psychology undergrads are! dont worry too much but you really need to dedicate yourself to psychology
- the general path to the doctorate from a psych BSc is: support worker (mental health preferably) ; honorary assistant psychologist; assistant psychologist (insanely hard to find) - doctorate.

tips i wish i knew:
- get experience in the labs in a research intern, research assistant, or lab technician ASAP. this will be shadowing or helping the psychologists with research, this is so valued. only voluntary so best to do while studying or alongside other work
- helpful to work as a bank support worker (meaning you work when you are free and if there are shifts), flexible and good for getting your foot in the door
- note: support work is also termed healthcare assistant, auxiliary nurse, support staff. these roles will require personal care sometimes (showering, toileting, feeding, moving the patient around physically, etc) so be aware. mental health support roles are not as physically demanding, but are more difficult to get.
- keep sweet with academic staff, getting a glowing reference for future applications is very useful!
- the doctorate process usually takes 3 or 4 rejections. each rejection means you need to work harder than before!

i really wish you the best, if psychology is your passion and you wont ever stray, then do the conversion, otherwise i would personally advise you to save your money since the job market is so over saturated! for international students, i've heard its easier to get experience abroad, so i recommend finding research or AP roles. all the best, happy to answer questions further
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NowhereMan.111
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(Original post by jeremzii)
hey there, im a recent Psych graduate from the UK

i would like to tell you now, that psychology is a very very competitive field. like its crazy. thats why im hoping to get out of the field, the path to a phd is just very unlikely for me, and would take like 7 to 10 years. some points:

- the conversion doesnt matter since its a course that brings you up to speed with psychology, the same way that psychology undergrads are! dont worry too much but you really need to dedicate yourself to psychology
- the general path to the doctorate from a psych BSc is: support worker (mental health preferably) ; honorary assistant psychologist; assistant psychologist (insanely hard to find) - doctorate.

tips i wish i knew:
- get experience in the labs in a research intern, research assistant, or lab technician ASAP. this will be shadowing or helping the psychologists with research, this is so valued. only voluntary so best to do while studying or alongside other work
- helpful to work as a bank support worker (meaning you work when you are free and if there are shifts), flexible and good for getting your foot in the door
- note: support work is also termed healthcare assistant, auxiliary nurse, support staff. these roles will require personal care sometimes (showering, toileting, feeding, moving the patient around physically, etc) so be aware. mental health support roles are not as physically demanding, but are more difficult to get.
- keep sweet with academic staff, getting a glowing reference for future applications is very useful!
- the doctorate process usually takes 3 or 4 rejections. each rejection means you need to work harder than before!

i really wish you the best, if psychology is your passion and you wont ever stray, then do the conversion, otherwise i would personally advise you to save your money since the job market is so over saturated! for international students, i've heard its easier to get experience abroad, so i recommend finding research or AP roles. all the best, happy to answer questions further
Hi!! Thank you for replying to my query. I really appreciate your insight upon it.

I get it, psychology is a very competitive field, but then again so is law for me. It would require for me around 8 to 9 years to establish my practice. I am genuinely interested in psychology. I find it more relatable to the person studying than to others. Studying it allows a better understanding of myself, so I am pretty sure that I'll not deviate from it. I am ready to sacrifice 7 years in order to firmly establish myself, but I need some solid base to start upon.

As a Non-UK citizen, I'll be needing a job immediately after graduation (MSc Psychology, Conversion) in order to extend my stay. So, how hard is it to get a starting job after graduation? Finding AP or research jobs.

I saw the majority of the related jobs are offered by NHS, so is there any prohibition or less chance for a Non-UK citizen to get a job there?

Also, what other options will I be having after graduation to start my way through PhD?





Thanking You,
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Middlesex University
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(Original post by NowhereMan.111)
Hope this reaches to you in good health!
I am an Indian national and currently in my final year of law. I am planning to opt for MSc Psychology (Conversion) after graduation. I would like to know the practical aspects of the same.
I am focusing on the programme to get a BPS certified degree in order to apply for PhD but I am unable to grasp its ground reality. So as a non-UK national, I wish to work as a clinical psychologist, preferably at NHS. I have researched a bit about the process and I know that after MSc I'll be needing a minimum 12 months of experience in order to apply for a PhD and only after completing the PhD, I can independently practise clinical psychology.
I would like to know how difficult is it for a Non-UK National (Indian) to get work experience just after MSc (Conversion) as an Assistant Psychologist at NHS or if not NHS then where if so? I mean, what are the prospects after MSc Psychology (Conversion) that are feasible?

Moreover, how hard is it to get into a PhD course after graduating with MSc Conversion degree. Does the "conversion" impact in the selection process?


Also, it will be of immense help if someone would give their opinion on the colleges which I should aim for. I have already noted some of them which are not too costly considering that I have already spent 5 years in a law degree.
Leeds Trinity University
University of Stirling
University of Greenwich
University of Chester
University of Bolton
University of West London
University of East London
Bucks New University
Middlesex University London
University of Bedfordshire
Liverpool Hope University
St. Andrews ( I am really interested but I am not able to consider it as viable option owing to the tuition fee as it is twice that of those mentioned above)

All these universities, the concerned MSc course are more or less of similar tuition fee for an international student. Which ones should be my preference?


The entire point of the query is to know whether is it too far-fetched an idea for an Indian having a law degree to find his way through in order to practice clinical psychology in the UK. What major problems will I be facing through and what all should be my priority concerns?


Thanking You In Anticipation
Hi, my name is Alex and I am ambassador at Middlesex.

Middlesex is great university which can provide you excellent facilities for studying. You can explore our campus here, during virtual tour: https://www.mdx.ac.uk/get-in-touch/virtual-tour Middlesex is about 10 minutes far away from Hendon Central station, where Northern Line works. You can also take a bus which will take you straight up to university. Our campus is new and modern.

MSc Psychology course aims to provide you with a sound knowledge of psychology, having been developed to impart the advanced knowledge required to serve your interests and career aspirations. You will benefit from the experience of our dedicated and enthusiastic staff. Our course is accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS) which means you'll gain Graduate Basis of Chartered Membership once you successfully complete this master's course. You can read more about it here: https://www.mdx.ac.uk/courses/postgr...ogy-conversion


Middlesex is really good univeristy and we have whole spectrum of different cultures. If you have more questions don't hesiitate to contact me.

I wish you good luck with your application.

Best,

Alex
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username4979592
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Not sure about any of the Uni’s you have listed tbh - there are better ones ,
Why changing from law ??
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