Difference between BA and BA (hons) ? Watch

petiso
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as asked above

thanks x
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the_alba
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An Honours degree is basically a degree with a classification of a 2:2 or above. A 3rd is classed as an Ordinary degree, so you can't put (Hons) after it.
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petiso
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ohh.. so im doing combined honours, so thats an honours degree lol? im sorry im silly lol. is that suposed to be harder than a BA or no difference?
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the_alba
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(Original post by wilthsni)
Wrong. A third is an honours degree, too.
Whoops. Beg pardon.
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Keoje
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A degree may be awarded with or without honours, with the class of an honours degree based on the average mark of the assessed work a candidate has completed. Below is a list of the possible classifications with common abbreviations. Honours degrees are in bold:

* First-Class Honours (First or 1st)
* Upper Second-Class Honours (2:1)
* Lower Second-Class Honours (2:2)
* Third-Class Honours (Third or 3rd)

# Ordinary degree (Pass)
# Fail (no degree is awarded)

Source: Wikipedia ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British...classification )
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River85
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(Original post by petiso)
ohh.. so im doing combined honours, so thats an honours degree lol? im sorry im silly lol. is that suposed to be harder than a BA or no difference?
If you pass the required number of modules then you'll get an honours degree. If you don't then you'll get a non-honours degree (straight BA)

http://www.dur.ac.uk/resources/facul...uide/App_i.pdf
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Paeony
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I believe that it used to be the case that to get the (hons) bit you had to do a dissertation. At least, that's how it used to be at my university. Now that's changed and every degree there is an honours degree - although I think there was a 'pass without honours' but that was for anyone who'd scored between 30-39 overall.
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YAP
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OP, given you're doing to Durham, then:

(Original post by River85)
If you pass the required number of modules then you'll get an honours degree. If you don't then you'll get a non-honours degree (straight BA)
If you were in Scotland, a BA (Hons) takes 4 years; but a BA takes 3.
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River85
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(Original post by Paeony)
I believe that it used to be the case that to get the (hons) bit you had to do a dissertation. At least, that's how it used to be at my university. Now that's changed and every degree was an honours degree, unless of course you failed it.
That may have traditionally been the case but now, for Durham (where the OP's going) you need to pass all modulue (achieve 360 credits). You can, however, carry the one failed module from the first year (which doesn't count towards the final degree classification anyway) and still get an honours degree.

So 360 credits or 340 credits (if the one failed module is from the first year).

Throughout your degree you can also pass 40 credits by compensation (so if you only narrowly fail). You still need to pass the dissertation, however. You can't fail the dissertation but be "compensated".

Any less than that (300 credits - but only at least 60 credits need to be passed in the final year). So it's possible to get a non-honours degree whilst failing the dissertation. So long as you don't fail more than another 20 third year credits.

A bit complicated, but the diagram explains it better than I can.
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River85
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(Original post by YAP)
OP, given you're doing to Durham, then.
Yes, I did give a deliberate Durham-biased response.

Although I think this is how most English unis operate.

(Original post by YAP)
If you were in Scotland, a BA (Hons) takes 4 years; but a BA takes 3.
Isn't it an MA (hons) after four years? At least in the ancients?
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harmonik
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(Original post by YAP)
If you were in Scotland, a BA (Hons) takes 4 years; but a BA takes 3.
Im pretty sure the 4 year course in Scotland means you end up with an MA, not BA (Hons).
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YAP
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(Original post by harmonik)
Im pretty sure the 4 year course in Scotland means you end up with an MA, not BA (Hons).
Oops, my bad - I'm a scientist :o: . BSc (Hons) is 4 years, BSc is 3 years; but as you say, the same isn't the case in the arts.
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harmonik
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Ahh I didn't realise that! My apologies.
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petiso
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so what do employers think of BA compared to BA (hons)?
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ZakBrannigan
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(Original post by Keoje)
A degree may be awarded with or without honours, with the class of an honours degree based on the average mark of the assessed work a candidate has completed. Below is a list of the possible classifications with common abbreviations. Honours degrees are in bold:

* First-Class Honours (First or 1st)
* Upper Second-Class Honours (2:1)
* Lower Second-Class Honours (2:2)
* Third-Class Honours (Third or 3rd)

# Ordinary degree (Pass)
# Fail (no degree is awarded)

Source: Wikipedia ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British...classification )
I would agree upto one point Keoje,this only applies in the Uk and Wales,I think its different in Scotland as i am certain u have to do 4 years to get a honours degree up there
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ZakBrannigan
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(Original post by YAP)
Oops, my bad - I'm a scientist :o: . BSc (Hons) is 4 years, BSc is 3 years; but as you say, the same isn't the case in the arts.
It depends upon Yap i suppose on which science course u have done,and whats the degree in.I am certain the degree i be starting after 3 years is a Bsc(hons)degree.
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River85
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(Original post by ZakBrannigan)
I would agree upto one point Keoje,this only applies in the Uk and Wales,I think its different in Scotland as i am certain u have to do 4 years to get a honours degree up there
Wales (along with Northern Ireland, England and Scotland) are in the UK.

But, yes, Scottish honours degrees are generally four years.

As for how employers will see them. They will be seen by many as inferior. 2:1s and firsts are generally considered to be "good" degrees by both employers and universities (for postgrad study) but an increasing number of grad employment schemes are accepting 2:2s. So getting a third will put you at a disadvantage. Not getting an honours degree at all will be quite a setback.

Ultimately there are so many variations to take into account. It's not as though every employer will automatically reject someone with a 3rd or less, or that you're future is doomed. Especially outside these grad schemes.

However, as you're going to Durham (and I don't mean to big it up) but you're obviously very intelligent (especially if you've got into the combined course with is very competitive) and, with the academic support avaiable, it's unlikely you'll get anything less than a 2:2. But, really, if you have the right work ethic, you should easily be looking at a 2:1 or first.
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petiso
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thanks for the info, im far from intelligent i just work very very very hard!!!!!
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jonnythemoose
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Seriously, does anyone actually get a straight degree without honours nowadays though?
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Tomber
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(Original post by jonnythemoose)
Seriously, does anyone actually get a straight degree without honours nowadays though?
Yeah it happens - a friend of mine has just graduated with an Ordinary from Cambridge. Silly boy :rolleyes:
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