I have a question about my university timetable

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Hazadd
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So im a first year studying medical science and I have just got my timetable.

firstly I have little knowledge on university terms so I must ask


1) what is the difference between lectures and seminars?

2) I have 10 hours on my timetable (8 hours lectures and 2 hours seminars) is this the norm?

3) is it essential that I attend all lectures and seminars?

thanks in advance
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remussjhj01
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A lecture is a larger group of people. The lecturer will talk AT you, and there's little room for any kind of interaction (though you may be able to ask questions at the end). You just take notes, and go back over that content outside of scheduled class time.
A seminar is a smaller group that will likely discuss the topics covered in a lecture. There is much more of an opportunity to discuss your ideas and ask questions about the content. It's more interactive.
Personally, I've heard that sciences (and I assume also medicine) have much more contact time than arts and humanities. I'm about to start a music degree, and I currently have around 8-12 hours per week of contact time. However, I start my course on Saturday, and most other unis don't start until later in the year, so it may just be that yours hasn't fully fleshed out yet, I know mine's been changing more the past few days.
It depends on the uni. Some do actually track attendance, and there will be repercussions if you miss a certain amount of contract time. However, whatever the rules are, I would really recommend not missing lectures unless it cannot be helped (eg. you're sick or have special commitments such as interviews, funerals etc). You will fall behind very quickly, and, since most lectures are online this year, you could potentially do much of it from your bed if you wanted (though again, wouldn't recommend).
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Catherine1973
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I do law do may be different but
Lectures are being taught something and you make notes. Tutorials cone after when you have read the subject and answered set questions and discuss then in small groups.
I had 2 hours lectures and 1 hour tutorials for each module (4 total so 12 hours planned stuff) do you have a tutorial for each module?
Our men attended event is not tracked for lectures (even when we attended In person, there were 200+ of us) tutorials we had to attend (or explain why not attended) but different unis have different rules on that and people with visa are supposed to attend everything.
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Hazadd
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So seminars are not actually that important
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Desideri
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(Original post by Hazadd)
So seminars are not actually that important
Seminars are definitely important! Probably more important than lectures tbh, as you can often read the lecture powerpoint without going to the lecture. Seminars are a chance to learn, check if your understanding makes sense, get ideas from other people, get feedback.
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remussjhj01
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(Original post by Hazadd)
So seminars are not actually that important
Seminars are still very important! Lectures give you the information, but seminars enable you to make sure you understand the information.
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University of Portsmouth Student Rep
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(Original post by Hazadd)
So im a first year studying medical science and I have just got my timetable.

firstly I have little knowledge on university terms so I must ask


1) what is the difference between lectures and seminars?

2) I have 10 hours on my timetable (8 hours lectures and 2 hours seminars) is this the norm?

3) is it essential that I attend all lectures and seminars?

thanks in advance
Hi!

In a lecture you'll be taught your course content by your lecturer where you'll be in big classes and you lecturer will literally just speak and you won't be able to raise your hand or ask that many questions (it can depend on your lecturer as some of mine will stand and speak for the hour where others do have some level of engagement/interaction with us students!). Whereas in seminars you'll be in a far smaller group of students and may have to prepare activities or work beforehand to work through, and this gives you an opportunity to ask questions and interact with your lecturer. You can always email your lecturers as well if you need any help and sort a 1-1-.

Contact hours differ massively from year 1 to year 3 and across different degrees! In my first year I had 15 hours whereas some of my friends in different courses had 9 hours. So don't worry about how many hours as it'll really differ.

I always say don't have a massive pressure on yourself to attend every lecture especially if you have any personal events or if you're ill/ oversleep as you are a student and need to allow yourself a little. But I do always try to remember that I am paying for my lectures which can motivate me to get up! Also as long as you don't fall behind and you catch up on the work you missed everything will be okay.

Best of luck at uni! Sam- official student rep
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hallamstudents
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(Original post by Hazadd)
So im a first year studying medical science and I have just got my timetable.

firstly I have little knowledge on university terms so I must ask


1) what is the difference between lectures and seminars?

2) I have 10 hours on my timetable (8 hours lectures and 2 hours seminars) is this the norm?

3) is it essential that I attend all lectures and seminars?

thanks in advance
Hi Hazadd

Lectures consist of a lot of students sitting in a lecture hall, listening to the lecturer and taking notes. Seminars are where you can apply what you have been taught in the lectures and ask any questions in regards to the material. So, seminars are smaller and are usually in a classroom where a tutor will go through the work with you and you may have to contribute. You may have to do prep before attending seminars.

Every course will have a slightly different timetable, in my first year I had 6 seminars and 6 lectures, all an hour long.

Some uni's/courses mark attendance, so if this is the case you may want to attend. My lectures were recorded,so if I did miss one I would be able to catch up. However, I preferred going in as that I didn't fall behind. I would say it is more vital you attend seminars as this is where you do most of your learning.

I hope this helps and good luck!

Zaira
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