Ag1212
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Is there a call for clinical psychologists?

After doing all the training would I get a job?
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Dechante
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(Original post by Ag1212)
Is there a call for clinical psychologists?

After doing all the training would I get a job?
It's not that you're not guaranteed a job after training because you most likely will but it's the fact the places to get onto a clinical psychology doctorate is so competitive!!! I read somewhere that it was like one place had 25 candidates. It takes on average 8-12 years to become a clinical psychologist as you do your BSc, have to get work as a assistant psychologist and this is quite hard to get onto so it will take you a while and it's unlikely you'll get an AP job first try. Employers tend to employ APs for AP roles and not graduates. Some unis ask for a years experience and some even ask for two years. You also need to do a masters degree.

In order to answer your question though, yes you'd get a job but it's actually so hard to get on the professional doctorate. That's by no means to put you off and you should go for it if you want but I thought I would tell you just in case you weren't aware of the whole process and competition
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Lord Asriel
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If you are able to qualify as a clinical psychologist, you will be able to find a post if you want one. It may not be your dream post, or one that guarantees you automatic promotion and progression, but there is very little unemployment among clinical psychologists. In fact they are currently on the occupational shortage list as there isn't enough to meet current demand. https://www.bps.org.uk/news-and-poli...-more-training

One of the reasons for this is that clinical psychology training places are government funded, and subject to NHS workforce planning. Like medics and nurses, places to train are mapped closely to anticipated demand. This isn't the case for other professions where universities are happy to take on as many students as possible, as they bring in money, without having to worry about whether students find work afterwards (this is what happens in undergrad psychology).

If we were to look at government projections there aren't enough clinical psychologists, mental health nurses, psychiatrists and a whole range of other mental health professionals for the NHS. That's not counting the various charities and private providers that also hire mental health professionals.

The main problem in psychology has never been about getting a job after training, it's about being able to get onto training in the first place.
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