Student from China coming to Quarantine in my House?

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Khanthebrit
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I received an email from my landlord today saying she has found a student from China who wants to secure a room where we live. However, what with quarantine restrictions, upon his arrival he would be expected to quarantine in the house for 2 weeks (in his room - which he said he would do), but in our house.

The thing is, I and other housemates just don't really feel happy about this. Firstly I really can't fathom how he is going to unpack all his things and lock himself solely in the room for those 2 weeks. He'll need access to the kitchen and toilet for sure. It's also just a risk for us - someone from China, who we don't know, in airports, living in the country where the outbreak happened, now coming to live with and quarantine with us. To me, it defeats the whole purpose of quarantine and stopping the spread of the virus. I'm sure as hell not quarantining with him, which now means I'll be a risk to the public.

I'm sure the chances are slim but am I being unreasonable to basically ask that he quarantine for 2 weeks before commencing his tenancy with us? Legally he has to do it, except we have to face the implications of living with the potential consequences that the very thing quarantine tries to prevent.
Last edited by Khanthebrit; 1 month ago
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Kill3rCat
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Yeah, you really can't effectively quarantine in a situation like that. How is he even expected to quarantine anyway, when he's got to go out to buy groceries, etc.? I've got no advice for you, but I can offer you my sympathies lol
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Khanthebrit
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(Original post by Kill3rCat)
Yeah, you really can't effectively quarantine in a situation like that. How is he even expected to quarantine anyway, when he's got to go out to buy groceries, etc.? I've got no advice for you, but I can offer you my sympathies lol
The landlady knows what we think and set it in stone. Hoping to hear back but I don't think she'll go through with it. I just wanted your opinions. I don't think it's unreasonable to say no.
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DiddyDec
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Just take reasonable precautions such as disinfecting and hand washing. It really isn't that big of a risk.
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Khanthebrit
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(Original post by DiddyDec)
Just take reasonable precautions such as disinfecting and hand washing. It really isn't that big of a risk.
Perhaps not but it defeats the whole purpose of quarantine. Coming from China, where we can't account for how bad it is out there, traversing through airports and transport, to then come quarantine in a house with students all who are strangers and we don't know him. Just seems unreasonable to expect us to take on that risk when he all would have to do is suffer 2 weeks of isolating by himself before moving into shared accommodation.
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bubblesrain
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You do know that China now has a low rate of 19-30 cases per day? I don't understand why the fact that he is Chinese and it originated there is relevant. In the UK we now have a lot more cases. Yes you can ask him to quarantine, it is your choice.
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DiddyDec
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(Original post by Khanthebrit)
Perhaps not but it defeats the whole purpose of quarantine. Coming from China, where we can't account for how bad it is out there, traversing through airports and transport, to then come quarantine in a house with students all who are strangers and we don't know him. Just seems unreasonable to expect us to take on that risk when he all would have to do is suffer 2 weeks of isolating by himself before moving into shared accommodation.
China is a massive country that did a pretty good job of containing the spread. I would be more concerned about someone coming from a European country.

You took the risk when you moved into shared accommodation.
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ecolier
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(Original post by bubblesrain)
You do know that China now has a low rate of 19-30 cases per day? I don't understand why the fact that he is Chinese and it originated there is relevant. In the UK we now have a lot more cases. Yes you can ask him to quarantine, it is your choice.
(Original post by DiddyDec)
China is a massive country that did a pretty good job of containing the spread. I would be more concerned about someone coming from a European country.

You took the risk when you moved into shared accommodation.
Indeed, the student from China probably feels less safe in the UK :lol:
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Khanthebrit
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(Original post by DiddyDec)
China is a massive country that did a pretty good job of containing the spread. I would be more concerned about someone coming from a European country.

You took the risk when you moved into shared accommodation.
All current students (3/4) have been in the UK for 2 weeks+ before moving in. I think it's reasonable to ask that the individual self-isolate themselves before coming to live in shared accommodation with us. It's reasonably foreseeable given the whole purpose of quarantine that there is potential for contamination here, although slim, I can't account for the risk it has on myself and the others. Anyone foreign coming in has to quarantine. That's the only way to mitigate the virus.
(Original post by bubblesrain)
You do know that China now has a low rate of 19-30 cases per day? I don't understand why the fact that he is Chinese and it originated there is relevant. In the UK we now have a lot more cases. Yes you can ask him to quarantine, it is your choice.
According to who? The Chinese Authorities that are locking Muslims in Camps? The problem is I don't know, and really nor do you. You and I both have no clue of the situation in China, or anywhere really outside the UK for that matter. I'm certainly not making this a race issue or really anything related to China. Just the fact an unknown person is coming from a country, traversing through busy airports and public transport, to then come quarantine in a house with strangers who aren't in a position to support him being stuck in his room for 2 weeks. Defeats the whole purpose of quarantine, as we'll be in public. He will also require full access to the house during his stay for it to be manageable.
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DiddyDec
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(Original post by Khanthebrit)
All current students (3/4) have been in the UK for 2 weeks+ before moving in. I think it's reasonable to ask that the individual self-isolate themselves before coming to live in shared accommodation with us. It's reasonably foreseeable given the whole purpose of quarantine that there is potential for contamination here, although slim, I can't account for the risk it has on myself and the others.
You can account for the risk, you have to do it every time you leave the house and come in to contact with strangers in public.

Just be sensible and you will probably be fine.
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bubblesrain
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(Original post by Khanthebrit)
All current students (3/4) have been in the UK for 2 weeks+ before moving in. I think it's reasonable to ask that the individual self-isolate themselves before coming to live in shared accommodation with us. It's reasonably foreseeable given the whole purpose of quarantine that there is potential for contamination here, although slim, I can't account for the risk it has on myself and the others.

According to who? The Chinese Authorities that are locking Muslims in Camps? The problem is I don't know, and really nor do you. You and I both have no clue of the situation in China, or anywhere really outside the UK for that matter. I'm certainly not making this a race issue or really anything related to China. Just the fact an unknown person is coming from a country, traversing through busy airports and public transport, to then come quarantine in a house with strangers who aren't in a position to support him being stuck in his room for 2 weeks. Defeats the whole purpose of quarantine, as we'll be in public.
It's fair enough that you want them to quarantine. I am Chinese lol and have Chinese relatives; I think I know the situation better than you. I understand that you would like them to quarantine - I think that's perfectly sensible. I do not understand how them being from China where it orginated relates in anyway.
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bubblesrain
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(Original post by DiddyDec)
You can account for the risk, you have to do it every time you leave the house and come in to contact with strangers in public.

Just be sensible and you will probably be fine.
Exactly! And in the UK a lot less people wear masks in public! Everyone in China wears a mask. The spread is a lot less likely with one person coming than when you are in public.
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999tigger
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(Original post by Khanthebrit)
I received an email from my landlord today saying she has found a student from China who wants to secure a room where we live. However, what with quarantine restrictions, upon his arrival he would be expected to quarantine in the house for 2 weeks (in his room - which he said he would do), but in our house.

The thing is, I and other housemates just don't really feel happy about this. Firstly I really can't fathom how he is going to unpack all his things and lock himself solely in the room for those 2 weeks. He'll need access to the kitchen and toilet for sure. It's also just a risk for us - someone from China, who we don't know, in airports, living in the country where the outbreak happened, now coming to live with and quarantine with us. To me, it defeats the whole purpose of quarantine and stopping the spread of the virus. I'm sure as hell not quarantining with him, which now means I'll be a risk to the public.

I'm sure the chances are slim but am I being unreasonable to basically ask that he quarantine for 2 weeks before commencing his tenancy with us? Legally he has to do it, except we have to face the implications of living with the potential consequences that the very thing quarantine tries to prevent.
As pointed out they are likely coming from a lower risk area and have more to fear about you.
I can see your point a bit but you could always tell your LL you will rent the other rooms between you.
You dont sound particularly welcoming., get the feeling you will make your hostility known.

Why not have a word with environmental health and the uni?
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Khanthebrit
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(Original post by 999tigger)
As pointed out they are likely coming from a lower risk area and have more to fear about you.
I can see your point a bit but you could always tell your LL you will rent the other rooms between you.
You dont sound particularly welcoming., get the feeling you will make your hostility known.

Why not have a word with environmental health and the uni?
I'm not very happy about it, which I think is reasonable, although I wouldn't hold any hostilities towards the individual. If it does go through then c'est la vie. They obviously don't have more to fear about it as obviously quarantining in shared accommodation would be out the question for them if that were the case.

I also believe mitigating the virus in public vs private accommodation is a whole different ball game. Using the same cutlery. The same shower. The same toilet. Cooking with the same utensils. Using the remote for the TV etc. Confined spacing. It's a lot harder to quarantine doing this. I suggested that he get in contact with the university as they seem to offer 2-week quarantine rooms to university students. It's not like I said no. Just I'd rather not but here's a solution to the problem.

It seems sensible and logical for them to self-isolate for 2 weeks before moving into shared accommodation. I'd be happy, everyone would be happy. These are the rules the UK government has setout, but it's an almost loophole here as it mentions nothing about quarantining in shared accommodation. Something which I may just have to suffer.

If it were a situation where I am high-risk (who knows), I think it's completely reasonable to ask that the individual quarantine for 2 weeks before moving into accommodation.
Last edited by Khanthebrit; 1 month ago
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DiddyDec
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(Original post by Khanthebrit)
I'm not very happy about it, which I think is reasonable, although I wouldn't hold any hostilities towards the individual. If it does go through then c'est la vie. They obviously don't have more to fear about it as obviously quarantining in shared accommodation would be out the question for them if that were the case.

I also believe mitigating the virus in public vs private accommodation is a whole different ball game. Using the same cutlery. The same shower. The same toilet. Cooking with the same utensils. Using the remote for the TV etc. Confined spacing. It's a lot harder to quarantine doing this. I suggested that he get in contact with the university as they seem to offer 2-week quarantine rooms to university students. It's not like I said no. Just I'd rather not but here's a solution to the problem.

It seems sensible and logical for them to self-isolate for 2 weeks before moving into shared accommodation. I'd be happy, everyone would be happy. These are the rules the UK government has setout, but it's an almost loophole here as it mentions nothing about quarantining in shared accommodation. Something which I may just have to suffer.

If it were a situation where I am high-risk (who knows), I think it's completely reasonable to ask that the individual quarantine for 2 weeks before moving into accommodation.
Why are you licking toilets and showers?
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999tigger
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(Original post by Khanthebrit)
I'm not very happy about it, which I think is reasonable, although I wouldn't hold any hostilities towards the individual. If it does go through then c'est la vie. They obviously don't have more to fear about it as obviously quarantining in shared accommodation would be out the question for them if that were the case.

I also believe mitigating the virus in public vs private accommodation is a whole different ball game. Using the same cutlery. The same shower. The same toilet. Cooking with the same utensils. Using the remote for the TV etc. Confined spacing. It's a lot harder to quarantine doing this. I suggested that he get in contact with the university as they seem to offer 2-week quarantine rooms to university students. It's not like I said no. Just I'd rather not but here's a solution to the problem.

It seems sensible and logical for them to self-isolate for 2 weeks before moving into shared accommodation. I'd be happy, everyone would be happy. These are the rules the UK government has setout, but it's an almost loophole here as it mentions nothing about quarantining in shared accommodation. Something which I may just have to suffer.

If it were a situation where I am high-risk (who knows), I think it's completely reasonable to ask that the individual quarantine for 2 weeks before moving into accommodation.
Then take it up with the LL and ask for a rent reduction or contact the other people I mentioned.
If you could show him your TSR post am sure he would move elsewhere.

Why would he be cooking with the same utensils?
Why do you think the shower puts you at risk?
Just wipe down door handles and wash your hands etc.
As it stands most student houses are rented by a group of students where they have the responsibility for filling it.
In contrast you only appear responsible for your own room?
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CoolCavy
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(Original post by Khanthebrit)
I also believe mitigating the virus in public vs private accommodation is a whole different ball game. Using the same cutlery. The same shower. The same toilet. Cooking with the same utensils. Using the remote for the TV etc. Confined spacing. It's a lot harder to quarantine doing this. I suggested that he get in contact with the university as they seem to offer 2-week quarantine rooms to university students. It's not like I said no. Just I'd rather not but here's a solution to the problem.
I went through 3 years of uni without sharing cutlery with people, just keep it in your room. Showers are literally washing themselves with soap as you use them.
I dont see how this individual is any more risky than the thousands of students that will be moving across the country into shared accommodation shortly. Everyone who moves into your house is a potential risk, not just those from china. Picking on someone just because of their origin when the origin has fewer cases than your own country is ignorant at best and racist at worst.
I wasn't best pleased back in april when the university sent us an email in error saying we had a new person moving in, because we had been in lockdown as a household already and it was the height of the pandemic.There is no lockdown now unless you are in an area with a local lockdown and you accepted this risk of living in a communal environment when you decided to go to/resume university this year against the backdrop of this pandemic.
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CoolCavy
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(Original post by Khanthebrit)
All current students (3/4) have been in the UK for 2 weeks+ before moving in.
They are still moving to an entirely new area though with entirely new people? It doesn't really matter if they have been in the UK or not, people can catch covid in england....
Unless they have been in the shared house longer than 2 weeks it doesnt hold much logic to allow people from the UK a free pass from quarantining compared to someone from abroad. For all you know someone in their old household could have had corona symptoms whist they were there or they could have caught it on the journey to uni.
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ANM775
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(Original post by Khanthebrit)
I received an email from my landlord today saying she has found a student from China who wants to secure a room where we live. However, what with quarantine restrictions, upon his arrival he would be expected to quarantine in the house for 2 weeks (in his room - which he said he would do), but in our house.

The thing is, I and other housemates just don't really feel happy about this. Firstly I really can't fathom how he is going to unpack all his things and lock himself solely in the room for those 2 weeks. He'll need access to the kitchen and toilet for sure. It's also just a risk for us - someone from China, who we don't know, in airports, living in the country where the outbreak happened, now coming to live with and quarantine with us. To me, it defeats the whole purpose of quarantine and stopping the spread of the virus. I'm sure as hell not quarantining with him, which now means I'll be a risk to the public.

I'm sure the chances are slim but am I being unreasonable to basically ask that he quarantine for 2 weeks before commencing his tenancy with us? Legally he has to do it, except we have to face the implications of living with the potential consequences that the very thing quarantine tries to prevent.
The landlord is thinking about their money, not your safety.

I can see your point, but I can also see why the landlord wants the person to move in..

unfortunately, I think the landlord has the final say.
The only way you'll get them to change their mind is to threaten to leave/find somewhere else to live ... meaning that they'll lose more income getting him to stay then not stay.

money talks at the end of day.....
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Khanthebrit
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(Original post by CoolCavy)
They are still moving to an entirely new area though with entirely new people? It doesn't really matter if they have been in the UK or not, people can catch covid in england....
Unless they have been in the shared house longer than 2 weeks it doesnt hold much logic to allow people from the UK a free pass from quarantining compared to someone from abroad. For all you know someone in their old household could have had corona symptoms whist they were there or they could have caught it on the journey to uni.
My whole argument applies to anyone coming from abroad. Let's remove China and just use France instead as the former seems to tug a few heartstrings.

I don't know what is happening in France. I am not living in a country that has any jurisdiction in France, and a student from there is coming to quarantine in our house for 2 weeks because he has been deemed a risk to public health by the UK government.

Yes, you're not pleased because there was a lockdown imposed by the UK government for our safety. I'm not pleased because there is a mandatory quarantine imposed by the UK government for our safety. I'm being told I'm at risk essentially by the authorities. You were too. You can see why it just doesn't naturally bode well with me.

And yet I'm told that I am safe because France (China ) has fewer cases. But then I'm told I'm at risk because the UK government has made it a legal requirement for these individuals to quarantine. Which one is it to be - am I safe or am I not? Do I go by your word or the authorities?

If it is safe, why is it on quarantine? The Authorities don't seem to think so.
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