Why won’t girls date boys with learning disabilitys?

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Anonymous #1
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I’ve always wondered why they won’t date guys like them?!
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khadijaaaxxxx
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i like a guy that has autism
loads of girls will date guys with learning disabilities
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ROTL94
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Learning disabilities such as? I've known a few dyslexics that had girlfriends and I'm dyspraxic and had no issues
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Anonymous #2
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I’ve always wondered why they won’t date guys like them?!
what about the other way around?
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londonmyst
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Some girls will, particularly those who have learning difficulties themselves.
Of those who won't the answer is probably not attracted, worried about anger management problems or legal capacity issues.
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username1060297
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Don’t think this is completely true but it does generally bell to be the case. Oxymoronic I know. I think the ones who do get into relationships especially so with people above their social league (as in social skills) are generally just lucky whilst others (majority) will be overlooked by general people because it is simply undesirable (in the sense that it can be problematic for people). Obviously depends on how you see and care for things but for most people, we are as superficial as tv shows us to be.
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Cryoraptor
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Depends on what kinds of learning disabilities we're talking about. If it's mild stuff like ASD, ADHD or high functioning dyslexia then me and virtually all my mates have something from that category and we all have had or currently have partners, and it's not really an obstacle. If we're talking about more serious things like lower functioning autism then it's generally because they are objectively not attractive. As someone with ASD and ADHD, I would not be interested in anyone with more difficulties than an ASD, ADHD or similar diagnosis because I physically can't get a boner for it. Whether that's self-loathing is up to you, the person reading this comment, to decide.
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PhoenixFortune
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It depends on the type of learning disability, and how far the disability affects their daily life (socialising, personal care, communication etc.). I'm not going to date someone that has a very limited understanding of the world, because that wouldn't be ethically or morally right.
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Cryoraptor
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(Original post by Ki Yung Na)
Don’t think this is completely true but it does generally bell to be the case. Oxymoronic I know. I think the ones who do get into relationships especially so with people above their social league (as in social skills) are generally just lucky whilst others (majority) will be overlooked by general people because it is simply undesirable (in the sense that it can be problematic for people). Obviously depends on how you see and care for things but for most people, we are as superficial as tv shows us to be.
Yes, as someone who went to a special unit in secondary school, I can confirm most people special enough to go to special school are generally quite low in the food chain (including me for most of my time there) and that means no matter how attractive or interesting they were, no girls would ever go near them. I can't blame anyone for it, it's just the way our species is programmed to behave, and in a sick Darwinian way, it's a good thing because it helps to prevent the propagation of those lower-quality genes. A lot of superficial behaviours make sense when you think about it, they evolved for a reason.
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Libbyc16
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preference
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Xarao
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Because they're not obligated to?
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username1060297
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(Original post by Cryoraptor)
Yes, as someone who went to a special unit in secondary school, I can confirm most people special enough to go to special school are generally quite low in the food chain (including me for most of my time there) and that means no matter how attractive or interesting they were, no girls would ever go near them. I can't blame anyone for it, it's just the way our species is programmed to behave, and in a sick Darwinian way, it's a good thing because it helps to prevent the propagation of those lower-quality genes. A lot of superficial behaviours make sense when you think about it, they evolved for a reason.
I think you need to let go of your label. Explore meaning to life and give yourself a philosophical meaning or reason detre. Then act accordingly and let whatever happen, happen. People will take interest. As long as you’re minding your own, and doing some good. It really doesn’t matter how many looks you get, it just matters that the looks you do get — are ones you want, like, or attracted because of your own charm.


As un inspiring as it is .... be positive about who you are .
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Stefan P Bargan
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(Original post by Anonymous)
I’ve always wondered why they won’t date guys like them?!
I mean it's human nature, a girl might be scared to be the provider and take the role of the man if the circumstances will lead to that. Many might worry that it will not be worth it even if they might like that person. Hopefully this will give you a better insight.
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Cryoraptor
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(Original post by Ki Yung Na)
I think you need to let go of your label. Explore meaning to life and give yourself a philosophical meaning or reason detre. Then act accordingly and let whatever happen, happen. People will take interest. As long as you’re minding your own, and doing some good. It really doesn’t matter how many looks you get, it just matters that the looks you do get — are ones you want, like, or attracted because of your own charm.


As un inspiring as it is .... be positive about who you are .
Thanks, in the past 18 months I have risen in the food chain. I'm now at a point which is somewhere at 'average person level', and because of that I can now see that some of my old friends were, and I put this in the most polite way possible, losers at the bottom of the food chain with sadly very little hope of rising anytime soon. But moving on from them, yes I agree with you. I think it doesn't really matter who you are, what you look like, what your interests are, what clothes you wear and so on, as long as you're confident in who you are, people will like you. Yeah, I have some quite unmanly interests, for example I quite like the early-2010s stuff of numerous female artists who are usually considered to cater to girls, but I own it. I'm not bothered what people might think about that, and in my experience, most people don't really care either if you're confident about yourself and own it. That's what people like, that's what the opposite (or same if that's your thing) sex finds attractive. Of course, other things matter, but I think confidence in oneself is the single biggest thing.
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CosmicApathy1
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(Original post by khadijaaaxxxx)
i like a guy that has autism
loads of girls will date guys with learning disabilities
Is autism a learning disability? I've met some smart autistic people.
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khadijaaaxxxx
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(Original post by CosmicApathy1)
Is autism a learning disability? I've met some smart autistic people.
i think it is for some people because the guy i like also has two autistic brothers and one of them has special needs and goes to a special school
im not 100% sure though
autism is on a spectrum though so it's debatable
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Cryoraptor
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(Original post by CosmicApathy1)
Is autism a learning disability? I've met some smart autistic people.
(Original post by khadijaaaxxxx)
i think it is for some people because the guy i like also has two autistic brothers and one of them has special needs and goes to a special school
im not 100% sure though
autism is on a spectrum though so it's debatable
It's considered a learning disability in the context of social difficulties and other such things. Of course, for many who are high-functioning, academic matters aren't really a challenge.

In academic terms, things like dyslexia would more be considered learning difficulties. But in the same vein, dyslexia doesn't really cause social difficulties.
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khadijaaaxxxx
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(Original post by Cryoraptor)
It's considered a learning disability in the context of social difficulties and other such things. Of course, for many who are high-functioning, academic matters aren't really a challenge.

In academic terms, things like dyslexia would more be considered learning difficulties. But in the same vein, dyslexia doesn't really cause social difficulties.
yeah exactly
depends on the person and their autism tbh
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CosmicApathy1
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(Original post by Cryoraptor)
It's considered a learning disability in the context of social difficulties and other such things. Of course, for many who are high-functioning, academic matters aren't really a challenge.

In academic terms, things like dyslexia would more be considered learning difficulties. But in the same vein, dyslexia doesn't really cause social difficulties.
Ah ok I get that thx.
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CosmicApathy1
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(Original post by khadijaaaxxxx)
i think it is for some people because the guy i like also has two autistic brothers and one of them has special needs and goes to a special school
im not 100% sure though
autism is on a spectrum though so it's debatable
Yeah it depends on the severity and where said person lands on the spectrum you're right.
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