skahjs
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Dylxn
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I’m a Year 13 student doing A level English Literature, Film Studies and Psychology. I have no knowledge of economics but I do have some advice.

Stop worrying about the grades you got at GCSE, they mean nothing now. Sure, they got you a place in college, but imagine this as a clean slate. Don’t let your GCSE grades define your choice because, whilst impressive, they will genuinely have no influence over your ability now.

Countless friends of mine were achieving 8’s and 9’s at GCSE but are now getting consistent D’s and E’s. On the flip side, I was getting consistent 5’s and 6’s at GCSE and am now achieving consecutive A’s at A level. My point in all of this is that this is a CLEAN SLATE. Your work ethic will define your grades now, not your past achievements. You can’t show up on the day and ace the exam anymore, you have to consistently work for it.

So, what SHOULD you allow to influence your decision?

Your INTERESTS.

Only choose an A level based on your interests, with the consideration of your future in mind. Do you have a career path in your head? Do you want to go to university after? If you do have a specific plan, choose the A level most relevant to that. If not, go with your ambitions.

Trust me in this.

You will do well at what you enjoy. I’d never done film studies or any film-related subject before in my life before college but something in my mind told me I’d enjoy it. I was terrified to take the risk and go with film but I did it and quickly soared to the top of the class. This is for one reason only - I genuinely love the subject!

English Literature sounds like a great combination with History and Sociology but are you prepared to do THREE essay-based subjects? It depends on you as a person. If you think you’ll enjoy economics (or it will be useful to your future) but are afraid it will differ too much from your other two subjects, do economics.

Good luck to you! Congrats on your GCSE’s, those are some excellent grades to be proud of, but make sure you’re going to be able to focus (for long periods of time) on whichever A levels you choose.
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skahjs
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(Original post by Dylxn)
I’m a Year 13 student doing A level English Literature, Film Studies and Psychology. I have no knowledge of economics but I do have some advice.

Stop worrying about the grades you got at GCSE, they mean nothing now. Sure, they got you a place in college, but imagine this as a clean slate. Don’t let your GCSE grades define your choice because, whilst impressive, they will genuinely have no influence over your ability now.

Countless friends of mine were achieving 8’s and 9’s at GCSE but are now getting consistent D’s and E’s. On the flip side, I was getting consistent 5’s and 6’s at GCSE and am now achieving consecutive A’s at A level. My point in all of this is that this is a CLEAN SLATE. Your work ethic will define your grades now, not your past achievements. You can’t show up on the day and ace the exam anymore, you have to consistently work for it.

So, what SHOULD you allow to influence your decision?

Your INTERESTS.

Only choose an A level based on your interests, with the consideration of your future in mind. Do you have a career path in your head? Do you want to go to university after? If you do have a specific plan, choose the A level most relevant to that. If not, go with your ambitions.

Trust me in this.

You will do well at what you enjoy. I’d never done film studies or any film-related subject before in my life before college but something in my mind told me I’d enjoy it. I was terrified to take the risk and go with film but I did it and quickly soared to the top of the class. This is for one reason only - I genuinely love the subject!

English Literature sounds like a great combination with History and Sociology but are you prepared to do THREE essay-based subjects? It depends on you as a person. If you think you’ll enjoy economics (or it will be useful to your future) but are afraid it will differ too much from your other two subjects, do economics.

Good luck to you! Congrats on your GCSE’s, those are some excellent grades to be proud of, but make sure you’re going to be able to focus (for long periods of time) on whichever A levels you choose.
Thank you for this detailed reply It really helps
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Dylxn
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(Original post by skahjs)
Thank you for this detailed reply It really helps
No problem.
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