[Poll] Should we re close school due to spike in Covid cases?

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Poll: Should we re-close Schools?
Yes (6)
25%
No (16)
66.67%
Not sure (2)
8.33%
Parziva1
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Do you think we should close schools again because of the spike in COVID cases today?

Just wanted to know your viewsπŸ‘
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blackugo
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Partially yes. Completely no. Some schools have no actual social distancing measures in place.
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Parziva1
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(Original post by blackugo)
Partially yes. Completely no. Some schools have no actual social distancing measures in place.
They should definitely make them safer, I agree
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Ambitious1999
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(Original post by Parziva1)
Do you think we should close schools again because of the spike in COVID cases today?

Just wanted to know your viewsπŸ‘
Definitely NOT! Kids have lost far too much schooling. The government did not think twice about throwing open pubs on July 4th while schools were forgotten about. We do not want to become a country where getting people drunk is more important than sending kids to school. But with this government sometimes I think it is
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1st superstar
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Hell no. The current R, Y6, Y7, Y11, Y12 and Y13 really need to be in school imo (happy to list the reasons why).
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(Original post by Ambitious1999)
Definitely NOT! Kids have lost far too much schooling.
Tell that to the teaching unions and people on YouTube...
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ROTL94
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My sisters three year old son has gone to school for two days and he's already sick, how they think it's safe for kids to go to school is beyond me
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khadijaaaxxxx
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(Original post by ROTL94)
My sisters three year old son has gone to school for two days and he's already sick, how they think it's safe for kids to go to school is beyond me
does he have corona?
or is he just sick?
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RyanC_
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No, I haven't even gone back yet! I want at least some time in school after 6 months of nothing
(and theres no way I can teach myself a levels from scratch from home!)
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Parziva1
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(Original post by ROTL94)
My sisters three year old son has gone to school for two days and he's already sick, how they think it's safe for kids to go to school is beyond me
I want schools to proceed with online teaching until things get better (lower number of cases)
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Parziva1
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(Original post by RyanC_)
No. I haven't even gone back yet! I want at least some time in school after 6 months of nothing
(and theres no way I can teach myself a levels from scratch from home!)
Does your school maybe do online teaching?
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A.Poet
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As a secondary school teacher, I'm in two minds on this. My school had excellent online learning provision during lockdown and personally I would feel very comfortable returning to this. However, I accept that not all students are in the same boat. The Government promised to supply disadvantaged students with laptops and, well you can guess what happened there. The problem at the moment is actually the lack of social distancing that happens. Many schools, my own included, are not managing this particularly well and students, while trying to navigate these tricky and confusing rules, aren't actually adhering to the rules very well. A lot of this is the fact that the rules are confusing/illogical - for example, two children in the same bubble don't have to socially distance onsite, but the moment they leave site, they have to. In addition, students don't have to socially distance in their bubbles, but sixth formers who are 16-18 are arguably at just as much of catching covid as I am so why shouldn't they socially distance from one another. What would reassure me is students actually making more of an effort to socially distance (many are I should add and we appreciate that, but many at my school aren't). From a teacher perspective, the lack of social distancing doesn't make me feel safe in my workplace and that's a shame, but I make sure to thank my students for socially distancing from me and respecting my right to be safe in the workplace because that allows me to teach them as effectively as I can.

(Original post by 1st superstar)
Tell that to the teaching unions and people on YouTube...
Actually do some research. Not all unions are like that. My union, NASUWT, tried to engage with the Government. It made clear that children needed to be back in school, but all they asked for was for the Government to have a plan B in the event cases rose. The Government do and guess what? It involves kids still going to school even in local lockdowns.
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RyanC_
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(Original post by Parziva1)
Does your school maybe do online teaching?
They do and have plans in place but I lack any motivation when not in the school environment so wouldn't get much productive work done... I also find it hard to concentrate at home due to my family.

(Original post by 1st superstar)
Hell no. The current R, Y6, Y7, Y11, Y12 and Y13 really need to be in school imo (happy to list the reasons why).
I'd say Y1 and Y2 too as that age is the most important to develop their reading/writing/maths skills.. unless the government wants a generation of illiterate kids that is :/

I agree with the other years tho
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Parziva1
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(Original post by A.Poet)
As a secondary school teacher, I'm in two minds on this. My school had excellent online learning provision during lockdown and personally I would feel very comfortable returning to this. However, I accept that not all students are in the same boat. The Government promised to supply disadvantaged students with laptops and, well you can guess what happened there. The problem at the moment is actually the lack of social distancing that happens. Many schools, my own included, are not managing this particularly well and students, while trying to navigate these tricky and confusing rules, aren't actually adhering to the rules very well. A lot of this is the fact that the rules are confusing/illogical - for example, two children in the same bubble don't have to socially distance onsite, but the moment they leave site, they have to. In addition, students don't have to socially distance in their bubbles, but sixth formers who are 16-18 are arguably at just as much of catching covid as I am so why shouldn't they socially distance from one another. What would reassure me is students actually making more of an effort to socially distance (many are I should add and we appreciate that, but many at my school aren't). From a teacher perspective, the lack of social distancing doesn't make me feel safe in my workplace and that's a shame, but I make sure to thank my students for socially distancing from me and respecting my right to be safe in the workplace because that allows me to teach them as effectively as I can.
I completely agree with the fact that there is little to no social distancing in schools.

The bubble thing is really confusing too, like for the fact that students may have siblings, hence the bubbles will be pointless.

I also don't understand why some schools won't allow masks to be wore in a classroom - as one could argue that is a densely packed place with no ventilation, hence according to the rules masks should be worn in classrooms, yet this hasn't been implemented.:confused:
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(Original post by A.Poet)
As a secondary school teacher, I'm in two minds on this. My school had excellent online learning provision during lockdown and personally I would feel very comfortable returning to this. However, I accept that not all students are in the same boat. The Government promised to supply disadvantaged students with laptops and, well you can guess what happened there. The problem at the moment is actually the lack of social distancing that happens. Many schools, my own included, are not managing this particularly well and students, while trying to navigate these tricky and confusing rules, aren't actually adhering to the rules very well. A lot of this is the fact that the rules are confusing/illogical - for example, two children in the same bubble don't have to socially distance onsite, but the moment they leave site, they have to. In addition, students don't have to socially distance in their bubbles, but sixth formers who are 16-18 are arguably at just as much of catching covid as I am so why shouldn't they socially distance from one another. What would reassure me is students actually making more of an effort to socially distance (many are I should add and we appreciate that, but many at my school aren't). From a teacher perspective, the lack of social distancing doesn't make me feel safe in my workplace and that's a shame, but I make sure to thank my students for socially distancing from me and respecting my right to be safe in the workplace because that allows me to teach them as effectively as I can.


Actually do some research. Not all unions are like that. My union, NASUWT, tried to engage with the Government. It made clear that children needed to be back in school, but all they asked for was for the Government to have a plan B in the event cases rose. The Government do and guess what? It involves kids still going to school even in local lockdowns.
If only everyone had your mind set, sadly they don't imo. The teaching unions have been injecting mass fear into students and parents when schools were shut (I totally understand why it was a barbaric Idea to have primary schools opened in June (I was 100% against re-opening schools in June) but parents and some teaching unions are saying that the virus should reach a point 0 before re-opening schools is taking the mickey mouse. We are in September some people have exams to sit next year so schools need to be open.) The unions on the news have also been saying things like don't do online lessons because not everyone has a computer or WiFi whilst simultaneously saying don't open school until the virus is at a point 0 like how does that make any sense? I have frankly lost faith in the teacher unions (not teachers in general) and I am not going to be listening to them that much anymore. I trust individual teachers such as yourself not the unions.
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(Original post by Parziva1)
I completely agree with the fact that there is little to no social distancing in schools.

The bubble thing is really confusing too, like for the fact that students may have siblings, hence the bubbles will be pointless.

I also don't understand why some schools won't allow masks to be wore in a classroom - as one could argue that is a densely packed place with no ventilation, hence according to the rules masks should be worn in classrooms, yet this hasn't been implemented.:confused:
Yeah some schools have said that you can't wear a mask in class which is stupid.
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LovelyMrFox
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Yes.
No matter what happens with schools ( going back in person, online, or not at all ), students are going to be at a disadvantage. Schools should not risk them and their families health to eliminate just a few of those.
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A.Poet
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(Original post by Parziva1)
I completely agree with the fact that there is little to no social distancing in schools.

The bubble thing is really confusing too, like for the fact that students may have siblings, hence the bubbles will be pointless.

I also don't understand why some schools won't allow masks to be wore in a classroom - as one could argue that is a densely packed place with no ventilation, hence according to the rules masks should be worn in classrooms, yet this hasn't been implemented.:confused:
To be fair, windows and doors should be open in all classrooms, but you are right about the bubbles being pointless and I too despair about that.

(Original post by 1st superstar)
If only everyone had your mind set, sadly they don't imo. The teaching unions have been injecting mass fear into students and parents when schools were shut (I totally understand why it was a barbaric Idea to have primary schools opened in June (I was 100% against re-opening schools in June) but parents and some teaching unions are saying that the virus should reach a point 0 before re-opening schools is taking the mickey mouse. We are in September some people have exams to sit next year so schools need to be open.) The unions on the news have also been saying things like don't do online lessons because not everyone has a computer or WiFi whilst simultaneously saying don't open school until the virus is at a point 0 like how does that make any sense? I have frankly lost faith in the teacher unions (not teachers in general) and I am not going to be listening to them that much anymore. I trust individual teachers such as yourself not the unions.
Again, it's really important to make a distinction here. NEU is the union which has been doing exactly what you say; NASUWT has not and has long said that schools should be as low a risk as possible (NASUWT accept schools cannot be no risk). It is NEU that advised its members not to offer online lessons for all manner for frankly spurious reasons. NASUWT again did not do that. It's worth distinguishing the two because NEU tends to be a very militant union with a strike-first policy where NASUWT goes for dialogue, then work to rule, then strike and is generally more moderate - this is why I unionised with NASUWT and will never join NEU. Ironically, though, the one activity schools could've done due to social distancing, exams, were cancelled last academic year and I find it curious more is not said about that.
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(Original post by LovelyMrFox)
Yes.
No matter what happens with schools ( going back in person, online, or not at all ), students are going to be at a disadvantage. Schools should not risk them and their families health to eliminate just a few of those.
This issue here it seems in that in the USA (where you are from) and other countries most schools (even the crap and poor ones) are actually bothering to offer their pupils online lessons (a full timetable of them too). This isn't the case here in the UK some schools have not bothered with giving their pupils online lessons or have started offering them too late, other schools here in the UK have failed to support their pupils throughout the lockdown and some have even gone as far as not setting any work! Hence why schools need to reopen or online lessons need to be made mandatory. I don't care which one happens but it's got to be one of them.

(Original post by A.Poet)
To be fair, windows and doors should be open in all classrooms, but you are right about the bubbles being pointless and I too despair about that.


Again, it's really important to make a distinction here. NEU is the union which has been doing exactly what you say; NASUWT has not and has long said that schools should be as low a risk as possible (NASUWT accept schools cannot be no risk). It is NEU that advised its members not to offer online lessons for all manner for frankly spurious reasons. NASUWT again did not do that. It's worth distinguishing the two because NEU tends to be a very militant union with a strike-first policy where NASUWT goes for dialogue, then work to rule, then strike and is generally more moderate - this is why I unionised with NASUWT and will never join NEU. Ironically, though, the one activity schools could've done due to social distancing, exams, were cancelled last academic year and I find it curious more is not said about that.
Yeah I definitely don't think that exams should have been fully cancelled but oh well.
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Just partially. HK government has announced that if someone in a school caught the virus or was identified as a close contact of an infected person, the school will be closed for 14 days.
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