indecisiveel2
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Hi just wanted to know which one is more respected? If I do Natsci (got a place not at Cambridge but still a RG uni) will it give me and advantage over people who did for example a straight biochem degree? Or will it jeopardise my future prospects since it’s very broad and not very specialised?

I just liked it because I would get to study both biochem and chem at degree level so I’d get the chance to both learn about reactions in the human body and the actual structures and methods of synthesis of the chemicals. I want to go into research to make new treatments and medicines to help treat diseases like cancer.

Any insights/ advice about if I’m making the right decision?
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bored_user:)
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It won't give you any sort of advantage or disadvantage but if you want to go into a particular field then the straight science degree would probs be better!
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indecisiveel2
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(Original post by bored_user:))
It won't give you any sort of advantage or disadvantage but if you want to go into a particular field then the straight science degree would probs be better!
I was thinking about that yeah. But I don’t know what skills you need to go into that specific field. So I thought having both the biological sciences and chemistry skills would help me in that sense. Although I might ask to switch to medical biochemistry because it sounds like a more suited degree for what I want to do. Scared they won’t let me though
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University of Bath
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(Original post by indecisiveel2)
Hi just wanted to know which one is more respected? If I do Natsci (got a place not at Cambridge but still a RG uni) will it give me and advantage over people who did for example a straight biochem degree? Or will it jeopardise my future prospects since it’s very broad and not very specialised?

I just liked it because I would get to study both biochem and chem at degree level so I’d get the chance to both learn about reactions in the human body and the actual structures and methods of synthesis of the chemicals. I want to go into research to make new treatments and medicines to help treat diseases like cancer.

Any insights/ advice about if I’m making the right decision?
Hi there,

I am a final year NatSci student, so hopefully I can help.

In short, NatSci courses don't necessarily give you an advantage or a disadvantage compared to a single science, as it all depends on what your career goals are. If you are interested in biochem and chem, then NatSci will be a great option for you! If you did straight biochem, you may find that it doesn't have enough chemistry for you. If you did straight chemistry, then it would have nowhere neat enough biology for you since you want to go into researching medicines and disease. In your case, NatSci would be an amazing option

I think it's important to dispel this idea that NatSci isn't very specialised, as that definitely isn't the case. Essentially, (at Bath at least) you do the exact same modules as the single science students, you just don't do all the modules from the course. For example, I take biology and pharmacology. In first year, I took 2 out of 3 biology modules, and the same for pharmacology. Essentially, you just pick the exact modules you want to do to customise your degree, instead of taking modules you aren't interested in. Your lectures are with the single science students and you take the same exams (i.e. all my biology lectures are together with biology and biochemistry students). The only exceptions are modules where knowledge of other modules is required, in which case they simply make minor adjustments to take into account that not all NatSci students will have done those other modules since they aren't compulsory. So, NatSci is broad in the sense that you are studying two sciences, but you study the same modules to the same depth as single science students. You just choose select modules to tailor your degree.

I would say that if you are interested in drug development and diseases, then there are some good degrees or NatSci combinations I could suggest. At Uni fo Bath, we have a Chemistry for Drug Discovery degree. Within NatSci, a good combination could be Biochemistry with Pharmacology, plus organic chemistry as an optional module. At Bath you choose a major and a minor from Biology, Biochemistry, Physics, Environmental Science, Chemistry and Pharmacology, plus an extra auxiliary/optional module. If you did biochemistry and chemistry, you would have to take inorganic or physical chemistry on top of organic, and those 2 aren't particularly relevant to drug development. If you did pharmacology, you take modules all about diseases, their symptoms, what causes them, how you treat them, how the drugs work and how you develop the drugs. For example, I take modules such as Drug Development, Central Nervous System diseases, Cardiovascular Diseases and so on. Pharmacology is definitely the module to take if you want to learn in depth about diseases, what causes them, how you treat them and how you develop those drugs.

I'd also suggest not exclusively focusing on RG universities. There are tonnes of amazing universities that are't Russell Group, that may rank higher than many RG unis but they just aren't big enough and don't offer enough courses to qualify as RG. Bath is definitely on of these universities - it is the 6th best uni in the UK (in the top 3 for many of our courses), but it is not a Russell Group uni. I was the same as you when I was applying and ignored non-RG unis, but I'm so happy that I looked at unis like Bath. I'd say the best unis that offer NatSci are Cambridge, Bath, Durham, UCl and Exeter, for reference

I hope this has helped, and please let me know if you have any more questions

Jessica, a final year NatSci student
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