Bristol University eradicates 'fatphobic' language from sport

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Occitanie
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https://www.lbc.co.uk/news/uk/bristo...ge-from-sport/

Bristol University fitness instructors and sports societies will be banned from telling students to “burn some calories”, as the student union voted to eradicate “fatphobic” and “diet culture” references.
The university’s student union passed a motion entitled “Changing our language to embrace body positivity”, with a purpose to provide a “more inclusive Sports Exercise and Health programme”.
Sports captains running “exercise-related events” will be told to attend a training session on “raising awareness of eating disorders and diet culture in sports”.
Meanwhile, all gym and fitness coaches must commit to “eradicating diet culture references and fatphobic language in exercise classes” and students will lobby the university to provide funding for training staff about eating disorders.

Burning calories is an essential part of losing, and indeed gaining weight.

Also, isn’t it a fitness instructors job to do and say everything to try and help their clients lose weight?

I don’t think they’re going around telling people they’re fat and ugly and should lose a couple pounds...
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DiddyDec
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Just another reason to laugh at ridiculous student unions.
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Occitanie
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(Original post by DiddyDec)
Just another reason to laugh at ridiculous student unions.
It’s insane. They talk about ‘body positivity’ which is a good thing, but losing weight, dropping your BMI is equally as vital.
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DiddyDec
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(Original post by Occitanie)
It’s insane. They talk about ‘body positivity’ which is a good thing, but losing weight, dropping your BMI is equally as vital.
They do make a valid point that exercise is not just about losing weight, I would imagine if you are doing it right you should be gaining weight since muscle is 3 times heavier than fat.
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Occitanie
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(Original post by DiddyDec)
They do make a valid point that exercise is not just about losing weight, I would imagine if you are doing it right you should be gaining weight since muscle is 3 times heavier than fat.
That’s why BMI isn’t always accurate. My BMI is quite high, but still in the healthy spectrum. I’m well above the average U.K. height, “big boned”, 90Kg or so.

Someone who is short (5”11 and below) who is physically fit and muscly will without a doubt have a BMI higher than 25, but it doesn’t take into account their physical activities and muscle mass. Meaning they aren’t necessarily unhealthy.

Exercise is a multi faceted area of health. It isn’t exclusive to just losing weight, of course it isn’t.

When a GP, dietician or fitness instructor tells you that you should lose weight or keep an eye on your calorie intake, it isn’t to insult you, it’s to promote health and your wellbeing.

They could easily tell you to eat more if you’re underweight.

We can’t forget that obesity costs the health sector billions each year. Thousands of deaths related to obesity are recorded each year too.

I personally think banning scientific language will do more harm than good.


Also I would assume to weight gained by putting on muscle is proportionally smaller. You’re losing fat when you exercise and build muscle. You can only gain a maximum amount of muscle.

I don’t think someone who is obese gains weight when they gain muscle.
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Pinkisk
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(Original post by Occitanie)
https://www.lbc.co.uk/news/uk/bristo...ge-from-sport/

Bristol University fitness instructors and sports societies will be banned from telling students to “burn some calories”, as the student union voted to eradicate “fatphobic” and “diet culture” references.
The university’s student union passed a motion entitled “Changing our language to embrace body positivity”, with a purpose to provide a “more inclusive Sports Exercise and Health programme”.
Sports captains running “exercise-related events” will be told to attend a training session on “raising awareness of eating disorders and diet culture in sports”.
Meanwhile, all gym and fitness coaches must commit to “eradicating diet culture references and fatphobic language in exercise classes” and students will lobby the university to provide funding for training staff about eating disorders.

Burning calories is an essential part of losing, and indeed gaining weight.

Also, isn’t it a fitness instructors job to do and say everything to try and help their clients lose weight?

I don’t think they’re going around telling people they’re fat and ugly and should lose a couple pounds...
This is an example of just how much the NUS is controlled by leftist extremists. Its policies are written in such a way as to ensure certain groups of people win positions of power and control within the union whilst other groups are excluded. I am willing to bet everything I have that all those that had a say in this matter were leftist extremists and those who disagreed were either not allowed a say in the matter or put in a position where they were made to be reluctant to express their opposition for fear of being expelled or suspended from the union/university. Such is the totalitarianism of the left, which has now taken over the higher education system in this country, a system which is entirely funded by the tax payer in a society where leftist extremists form a non-existent minority. If you analyse the way things work in this country, you come to the realisation that we don't really live in a democracy.
Last edited by Pinkisk; 3 weeks ago
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Underscore__
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(Original post by DiddyDec)
They do make a valid point that exercise is not just about losing weight, I would imagine if you are doing it right you should be gaining weight since muscle is 3 times heavier than fat.
But if a person exercises they won’t replace each cubic inch of fat lost with a cubic inch of muscle, if they did then yes, their weight would go up.

While I do agree that just losing weight is not a good target, BMI and weight will generally be a pretty decent indicator of whether someone has a healthy body composition or not
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Occitanie
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(Original post by Underscore__)
But if a person exercises they won’t replace each cubic inch of fat lost with a cubic inch of muscle, if they did then yes, their weight would go up.

While I do agree that just losing weight is not a good target, BMI and weight will generally be a pretty decent indicator of whether someone has a healthy body composition or not
I think the only time when a person would gain weight when gaining muscle, is someone with an already very low-fat %... and even then the weight gain wouldn't be that big at all.
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Iñigo de Loyola
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In the words of Ben Shapiro, facts don't care about your feelings.
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Underscore__
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(Original post by Occitanie)
I think the only time when a person would gain weight when gaining muscle, is someone with an already very low-fat %... and even then the weight gain wouldn't be that big at all.
Yeah either that or if you’re just trying to bulk up. I’ve put on about 10-11kg in the past couple of years, I definitely have a lot more muscle but also more fat which I guess is part of the trade off of trying to get bigger
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