SS123456
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Hi

Does anyone recommend anything in particular to have? I’ll be looking at some planners soon I love to keep myself organised. Anything else I’ll need for the university lead PGCE
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04MR17
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Posting to subscribe as I'm also starting my PGCE and am keen to know this

Though I hope I have most necessary things. :unsure:

At the taster day (online) that I went to someone just finishing his PGCE recommended having several big lever arch files/ring binders for all the paperwork (formal lesson obs, evaluations, QTS evidence etc.) which I thought was quite helpful.
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bluebeetle
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(Original post by SS123456)
Hi

Does anyone recommend anything in particular to have? I’ll be looking at some planners soon I love to keep myself organised. Anything else I’ll need for the university lead PGCE
Few tips in terms of supplies:

- an expanding A4 file (with at least 5 compartments) can be super useful during placements when you have printed plans / worksheets for multiple classes and no classroom to store them in

- you will probably need a big folder or multiple big folders. Probably don't buy more than one to start with, and then see how much physical paperwork you end up with

- USB stick is handy to have. When you come to the end of your placement, if you've saved all your stuff on your school account, you will probably want to retrieve it so you can take it to your NQT year. Just be careful not to store sensitive data on it

- definitely a planner

- an emergency whiteboard pen. The schools you're placed in should have them in classrooms, but you don't want to be stuck without one when stood in front of a class, so it's a good idea to have a backup in your pencil case

- it can be useful to have a notebook specifically for notes on lessons that you observe, so you have all those ideas / info in one place to refer back to

- I found bulldog clips incredibly useful for organising worksheets. It will depend on where you end up teaching and the subject, but in one of my placement schools, it was very typical to be using a printed starter and also a printed worksheet and then maybe even a printed exit ticket, so I needed the bulldog clips to keep everything organised!!

- a stress ball (only slightly joking here!)

Good luck with your PGCE!
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04MR17
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(Original post by bluebeetle)
- an emergency whiteboard pen. The schools you're placed in should have them in classrooms, but you don't want to be stuck without one when stood in front of a class, so it's a good idea to have a backup in your pencil case
Been thinking about this - I wonder if we (and other staff) are safer using our own rather than the ones in the classroom at the moment?
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SS123456
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(Original post by bluebeetle)
Few tips in terms of supplies:

- an expanding A4 file (with at least 5 compartments) can be super useful during placements when you have printed plans / worksheets for multiple classes and no classroom to store them in

- you will probably need a big folder or multiple big folders. Probably don't buy more than one to start with, and then see how much physical paperwork you end up with

- USB stick is handy to have. When you come to the end of your placement, if you've saved all your stuff on your school account, you will probably want to retrieve it so you can take it to your NQT year. Just be careful not to store sensitive data on it

- definitely a planner

- an emergency whiteboard pen. The schools you're placed in should have them in classrooms, but you don't want to be stuck without one when stood in front of a class, so it's a good idea to have a backup in your pencil case

- it can be useful to have a notebook specifically for notes on lessons that you observe, so you have all those ideas / info in one place to refer back to

- I found bulldog clips incredibly useful for organising worksheets. It will depend on where you end up teaching and the subject, but in one of my placement schools, it was very typical to be using a printed starter and also a printed worksheet and then maybe even a printed exit ticket, so I needed the bulldog clips to keep everything organised!!

- a stress ball (only slightly joking here!)

Good luck with your PGCE!
Wow thanks for that!

This will sound so silly but do you have any other tips on how to stay interactive on the placement aspect. I know we’re observing. But will we need to keep good interaction with the students too?

Thanks in advance
Last edited by SS123456; 2 weeks ago
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stephanieg1992
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(Original post by SS123456)
Wow thanks for that!

This will sound so silly but do you have any other tips on how to stay interactive on the placement aspect. I know we’re observing. But will we need to keep good interaction with the students too?

Thanks in advance
Definitely! I'm going to give some advice but always, ALWAYS ask the teacher before you do anything to 'help'. I've made the mistake of helping a child who the teacher didn't want helping at that particular moment, so just always make sure for the first couple of days- you'll get into the routine and then there'll be less needing to ask the teacher's 'permission' to help out.

Some teachers are very laidback, others aren't, and you don't know til you get there. Ask the teacher what they would like you to do to help out. You will basically play a teacher assistant role for a while!! It's a fantastic way to see how to teach and to get to know the kids.

As general advice, the first couple of lessons, when the teacher is doing input, I would be watching how they settle the class, introduce the learning objective, how they assess (asking questions, getting them to do work on whiteboards, partner talk), deal with any misbehaviour etc. When the kids are working, the teacher will likely ask you to help out a group or individual. If they don't, ask if you can- getting to know the kids (and their names!!) is vital to establishing rapport when you're teaching them yourself. After the first couple of lessons, when you've really seen how the teacher establishes routine, get more involved. Sit on the carpet with some children when they're doing whiteboard work and see how they work- as long as the teacher is okay with it!!

Also, ask for a seating plan (or seating plans)! It will help SO much with names.

*I'm also starting my PGCE next week so I'm not a teacher or any sort of expert, but I've worked in a lot of different schools.

edit: just to clarify, I've worked in Primary only. It might work very differently in Secondary, but I imagine it's much the same as getting to know the kids is super important before you start having control of the class.
Last edited by stephanieg1992; 2 weeks ago
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bluebeetle
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(Original post by SS123456)
Wow thanks for that!

This will sound so silly but do you have any other tips on how to stay interactive on the placement aspect. I know we’re observing. But will we need to keep good interaction with the students too?

Thanks in advance
I second a lot of the advice above.

In a way, I think it will depend on the school. At both of my placements, I was told from day one that basically, you can go around and help and also ask students questions (“do you usually do tasks like this?”, “do you find this sort of task useful?”) as much as you like, so long as you stay quiet when the teacher is talking or has asked for silent work. Kids will often try to talk to you when the teacher is talking, and the best thing to do is shake your head and look pointedly towards the teacher or to quietly say “I’m listening to Miss /Sir” if they persist.

I think it’s quite normal that early on, in the first couple of observations, you won’t walk around and help as much, and that’s fine. Everybody knows it’s nervewracking!

Definitely do try to learn names and prove to children that you’re good at helping them before taking over though.
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