How much are puppies in the UK?

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Doones
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#21
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#21
(Original post by rxyaltyx)
My dog is a wheaten terrier
:five: the best!
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CoolCavy
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#22
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#22
(Original post by Anonymous)
PLEASE do not buy from a breeder. The dog breeding industry is horrendous and treats animals like they’re disposable. In my opinion if you can’t find a suitable rescue dog then you shouldn’t have a dog at all.
Depends on the breeder really, i've spoken to a lot of breeders online who really care about their pups and focus on quality rather than quantity. A lot of them even try to keep in some sort of contact with the dog throughout it's life and will even take it back and rehome if the owner can't look after it, rather than sending it to a rescue.
I do agree that a lot of popular breeds (and trendy crosses like cavapoos) are frequently just churned out, the breeding of brachycephalic breeds is also morally dubious even from a 'reputable' breeder. There is a lot of advice online on how to find a good breeder, some puppy farmers and people in it for the money are very clever though and will borrow a flat and a female dog to pose as a 'family pet bred' one.
Ultimately although i have mainly rescue animals i do believe in the fact people have a choice. As long as the dogs themselves aren't suffering from overbreeding/inbreeding/unhealthy phenotypes etc i dont see the issue with purchasing from someone responsible.
Rescues are fabulous but a lot of shelters have very long waitlists especially now as a result of covid and some people like the relative predictability of a pedigree/bred dog in terms of temperament and similar.
Incidentally it was PETA who coined the 'adopt dont shop' mantra which is something that isnt well known. As is well known they are often very extreme with their rhetoric, refer to owners as 'guardians' and disagree with pet ownership in general (obviously not trying to imply that you share similar views).
A happy medium seems to be the best way forward in terms of adoption and breeding
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Anonymous #4
#23
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#23
you should definitely adopt not shop! you should visit your local rescue centre / dog pound / dogs trust.
Getting a puppy means that a dog in a shelter will not get a home / get put to sleep.
Please consider adopting and helping an animal that may have had a difficult start to life
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B92_uk
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#24
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#24
ita not for everyone but I would always suggest you do it yourself if you plan on breeding and myself would be keeping the puppies for my pack. some would be sold to responsible owners with strict paperwork stating the the puppies are not to be sold on and must be newted or spayed ones leaving my care. for most people using a rescue service is the best option. 3 of my siberian huskies are rescues and I have to say particularly iv found with there breed the older they get the more being passed around affects them, dogs for life guys choose your breeds very carefully
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Ciel.
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#25
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#25
(Original post by Anonymous)
Some small dog breeds only need about 30 mins of exercise a day from walking which is manageable for me. I don't live alone and there's always someone home. I have a decent size balcony that has grass so if last minute they need to do their business they could use that. I would only get a small dog that I know would be okay in an apartment compared to bigger and more hyperactive dogs like huskies or labradors.
just get a cat. your house isn't suitable for a dog.
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Anonymous #3
#26
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#26
(Original post by CoolCavy)
Depends on the breeder really, i've spoken to a lot of breeders online who really care about their pups and focus on quality rather than quantity. A lot of them even try to keep in some sort of contact with the dog throughout it's life and will even take it back and rehome if the owner can't look after it, rather than sending it to a rescue.
I do agree that a lot of popular breeds (and trendy crosses like cavapoos) are frequently just churned out, the breeding of brachycephalic breeds is also morally dubious even from a 'reputable' breeder. There is a lot of advice online on how to find a good breeder, some puppy farmers and people in it for the money are very clever though and will borrow a flat and a female dog to pose as a 'family pet bred' one.
Ultimately although i have mainly rescue animals i do believe in the fact people have a choice. As long as the dogs themselves aren't suffering from overbreeding/inbreeding/unhealthy phenotypes etc i dont see the issue with purchasing from someone responsible.
Rescues are fabulous but a lot of shelters have very long waitlists especially now as a result of covid and some people like the relative predictability of a pedigree/bred dog in terms of temperament and similar.
Incidentally it was PETA who coined the 'adopt dont shop' mantra which is something that isnt well known. As is well known they are often very extreme with their rhetoric, refer to owners as 'guardians' and disagree with pet ownership in general (obviously not trying to imply that you share similar views).
A happy medium seems to be the best way forward in terms of adoption and breeding
I just can’t see the justification for it while there are hundreds of rescue dogs available; not a single shelter near me has a waiting list. People just want designer dogs, meaning the less popular breeds are left in shelters for years on end. Even if you go with a “good” breeder, you are still encouraging that industry to continue thriving by buying into it. It’s also very difficult to tell whether you are breeding a damaging genotype into a dog or not, as some mutations are not immediately evident in the phenotype until it’s too late. I also don’t think it makes any difference who coined that phrase, I agree with the sentiment rather than whoever might have ‘thought of it first’.
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B92_uk
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#27
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#27
(Original post by Anonymous)
I just can’t see the justification for it while there are hundreds of rescue dogs available; not a single shelter near me has a waiting list. People just want designer dogs, meaning the less popular breeds are left in shelters for years on end. Even if you go with a “good” breeder, you are still encouraging that industry to continue thriving by buying into it. It’s also very difficult to tell whether you are breeding a damaging genotype into a dog or not, as some mutations are not immediately evident in the phenotype until it’s too late. I also don’t think it makes any difference who coined that phrase, I agree with the sentiment rather than whoever might have ‘thought of it first’.
I have to comment on this , alot of these recues unfortunately don't make it very easy for the dogs to be adopted, unfortunatly I can cost an awful lot for a rescue and this does make some people unable to afford this.

many have even made a business out of this charging upwards of 500 pounds for there dogs to be removed after all costs.

if there was a better way to do this it would be being done and unfortunately it starts with all owners being responsible
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CoolCavy
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#28
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#28
(Original post by Anonymous)
I just can’t see the justification for it while there are hundreds of rescue dogs available; not a single shelter near me has a waiting list. People just want designer dogs, meaning the less popular breeds are left in shelters for years on end. Even if you go with a “good” breeder, you are still encouraging that industry to continue thriving by buying into it. It’s also very difficult to tell whether you are breeding a damaging genotype into a dog or not, as some mutations are not immediately evident in the phenotype until it’s too late. I also don’t think it makes any difference who coined that phrase, I agree with the sentiment rather than whoever might have ‘thought of it first’.
Each to their own, i've known people who have complained they can't get a dog from dogs trust, battersea etc because the demand is so high. If you go onto their facebook page there are always comments complaining about it.
People need to get the dog/breed/individual that is right for them otherwise those same rescue dogs will be back at the shelters when they have destroyed someone's sofa out of boredom because the owner wasn't right for the dog.
Not everyone wants designer breeds but some want breeds that you wont find in rescues, i've never seen a rescue advert for a rescue gordon setter, bouvier des flandres, pharaoh hound, greenland dog etc.
Rescue dogs are great but it can be a lottery as to what you get especially if you get one as a puppy. Some mixed breeds grow up to be far larger than a person expected because they thought it was a different breed entirely. Rescue centres can guess at the background but with strays there is no real way of knowing. The chance can make it exciting and novel for some people but equally i can understand why someone may want to choose a specific breed that is easier to predict in terms of temperament, exercise requirements and space requirements.
A lot of dogs in shelters are staffies, staffie crosses or lurchers. All of which are wonderful dogs but that don't suit the lifestyle of everyone. I would love a lurcher but i keep rodents and their high prey drive wouldn't be suitable for my household.
As I say it's a personal choice.
Last edited by CoolCavy; 2 weeks ago
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CoolCavy
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#29
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#29
(Original post by B92_uk)
I have to comment on this , alot of these recues unfortunately don't make it very easy for the dogs to be adopted, unfortunatly I can cost an awful lot for a rescue and this does make some people unable to afford this.

many have even made a business out of this charging upwards of 500 pounds for there dogs to be removed after all costs.

if there was a better way to do this it would be being done and unfortunately it starts with all owners being responsible
PRSOM, the RSPCA gave us a real hard time when we tried to adopt our first rescue guinea pigs (we had already had guineas prior these were just our first adoptees). I understand they just want what is best for the animal and need to do background checks but they don't make it easy. There needs to be a balance between making sure the person is suitable and the animal is going to a home it can ideally spend the rest of it's life in whilst not alienating people who are looking to adopt.
We get our guinea pigs from a smaller local rescue now that has fewer hoops to jump through.
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Anonymous #1
#30
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#30
(Original post by Anonymous)
I just can’t see the justification for it while there are hundreds of rescue dogs available; not a single shelter near me has a waiting list. People just want designer dogs, meaning the less popular breeds are left in shelters for years on end. Even if you go with a “good” breeder, you are still encouraging that industry to continue thriving by buying into it. It’s also very difficult to tell whether you are breeding a damaging genotype into a dog or not, as some mutations are not immediately evident in the phenotype until it’s too late. I also don’t think it makes any difference who coined that phrase, I agree with the sentiment rather than whoever might have ‘thought of it first’.
As I said in my first post, dogs homes aren't an option for me because I don't have a garden. I'm assuming dogs homes want dogs to go to the best possible home and not risk having rescue dogs abandoned again which is completely understandable. I remember once a few years ago, a dogs home required staff to visit and inspect homes before rehoming dogs too. It seemed harder to get a dog from a dogs home compared to "dog breeders" (I think that's the correct term).
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gomeshelen
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#31
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#31
The price usually depends on the breed, sex, and quality. I took my dog in local rescue centre some time ago and I don't have any regrets. Based on my own experience I can suggest you to read more info before getting a puppy, I have found many useful info for first time owner here https://www.caninefinds.com/. There many healthcare tips and product reviews. Hope it helps you too.
Last edited by gomeshelen; 1 week ago
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