Anonymous #1
#1
Report Thread starter 1 month ago
#1
Is it that hard?
I'm scared I'm going to start my nursing degree and apparently loads of people drop out in the first year.
I messaged someone I knew who was doing nursing and they said they dropped out after their first week on placement of first year and then I saw someone else dropped out after 6 months.
Why do loads of people drop out, compared to any other degree is it a lot more difficult or something?
0
reply
Anonymous #2
#2
Report 1 month ago
#2
Maybe some people like the idea of it but are not suitable or can't stomach taking care of other people. I love medical shows and wanted to be in the medical field as a kid but I hate seeing others in pain, blood, feces, puss etc. so as much as the idea is appealing I know this is not something I could ever woke in. Also it's not very transferable so if you do like a finance degree you still feel like there are so many other fields within business you can work in so you'll complete your degree even if a finance heavy career might not be for you.
3
reply
PhoenixFortune
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#3
Report 1 month ago
#3
(Original post by Anonymous)
Is it that hard?
I'm scared I'm going to start my nursing degree and apparently loads of people drop out in the first year.
I messaged someone I knew who was doing nursing and they said they dropped out after their first week on placement of first year and then I saw someone else dropped out after 6 months.
Why do loads of people drop out, compared to any other degree is it a lot more difficult or something?
It can be difficult in terms of knowledge of some people, but can be incredibly emotionally draining. On placements, you will see people at their most vulnerable, and that would be overwhelming for many students. Many students haven't had exposure to people who need extensive care (for example in a nursing home or similar), so it can be be a shock. Some people get used to it, some don't. Another factor might be that nursing students (and graduate nurses too of course) must work on a sometimes unsociable rota which includes nights, weekends etc. that some aren't willing to sacrifice.
3
reply
moonkatt
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#4
Report 1 month ago
#4
Reality does not meet expectations
4
reply
NeverANurse
Badges: 7
Rep:
?
#5
Report 1 month ago
#5
I think some of it is the fact that it’s a career that unless you experience it, you can’t really know for sure if it’s right for you? Or at least, not until you actually get into the nitty-gritty of the practical aspects; because the theory is very different to the reality! Like a lot of jobs I suppose.
0
reply
claireestelle
Badges: 22
Rep:
?
#6
Report 1 month ago
#6
(Original post by Anonymous)
Is it that hard?
I'm scared I'm going to start my nursing degree and apparently loads of people drop out in the first year.
I messaged someone I knew who was doing nursing and they said they dropped out after their first week on placement of first year and then I saw someone else dropped out after 6 months.
Why do loads of people drop out, compared to any other degree is it a lot more difficult or something?
I dropped out of mental health nursing during my first placement (i'd had a small amount of experience at a hospital, a supported living place and an addiction clinic before I applied so thought i would be fine with the harder parts of the job) , I struggled with service users saying they wished I would die and was assaulted on placement and also with the fact I would have to given medicines covertly when it was in someone's best interests to do so. I knew it was their illness not them but I wasn't strong enough to cope with the possibility that I could be assaulted/insulted again and the long hours weren't good for my health.
3
reply
Ramipril
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#7
Report 1 month ago
#7
The reality isn't what people imagine it will be.
1
reply
nursingstudentuk
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#8
Report 1 month ago
#8
(Original post by moonkatt)
Reality does not meet expectations
(Original post by Ramipril)
The reality isn't what people imagine it will be.
In what ways do you guys think people get the wrong expectations?
0
reply
Mojmeer
Badges: 18
Rep:
?
#9
Report 1 month ago
#9
Nursing is really hard.
2
reply
moonkatt
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#10
Report 1 month ago
#10
(Original post by nursingstudentuk)
In what ways do you guys think people get the wrong expectations?
Loads of ways. People often don’t realise how challenging ward work can be, others expect to be undertaking complex clinical tasks straight away. The academic workload alongside full time hours on placement can be challenging (hence my advice about starting assignments early on). It can be emotionally challenging, people can be demanding, some downright unpleasant. People die.
4
reply
nursingstudentuk
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#11
Report 1 month ago
#11
(Original post by moonkatt)
Loads of ways. People often don’t realise how challenging ward work can be, others expect to be undertaking complex clinical tasks straight away. The academic workload alongside full time hours on placement can be challenging (hence my advice about starting assignments early on). It can be emotionally challenging, people can be demanding, some downright unpleasant. People die.
All makes sense. Everything you've written here is what I expected anyway, so hopefully I wont be one of the dropouts lol
0
reply
Suave Lad
Badges: 10
Rep:
?
#12
Report 1 month ago
#12
Too laborious and underpaid.
3
reply
xoxAngel_Kxox
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#13
Report 1 month ago
#13
Recently, my mum ended her career as a nurse after 30 years of working in the profession. The reason for that was that she didn't feel that she was able to provide the care the patients deserved, and that she'd learned to provide when she trained (way before you had to go to university!)

It possibly isn't the same at all hospitals, but where she worked they were so stretched they barely had enough time for the patients, so certainly didn't have the time to chat to them and make them feel at ease. She worked on a post-op ward, but they would regularly get moved, to wards with specialisms that they just weren't up to date with - my mum was even asked to take charge of those wards on several occasions, as she'd been a sister in her previous job.

Also there was too much emphasis on paperwork and appraisals and my mum felt that the very essence of nursing - the care - had been pushed aside.

So that's why she left - and if student nurses have a lovely idea in their heads of how they're going to bond with patients and make their experience as positive as possible they may be shocked at how stressful the role can be, and how little time they may have with their patients to provide the care they'd hoped to.

EDIT: Also there's the issue with pay and hours of course. She's in a 9-5 job now and enjoys having Christmases off, which she literally hadn't had for the whole of her adult life! She never complained about it, and always said it was a privilege to share Christmas with those unable to be at home with their families, but even so, she enjoys the time off now.
3
reply
Seretonin
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#14
Report 1 month ago
#14
(Original post by xoxAngel_Kxox)
Recently, my mum ended her career as a nurse after 30 years of working in the profession. The reason for that was that she didn't feel that she was able to provide the care the patients deserved, and that she'd learned to provide when she trained (way before you had to go to university!)

It possibly isn't the same at all hospitals, but where she worked they were so stretched they barely had enough time for the patients, so certainly didn't have the time to chat to them and make them feel at ease. She worked on a post-op ward, but they would regularly get moved, to wards with specialisms that they just weren't up to date with - my mum was even asked to take charge of those wards on several occasions, as she'd been a sister in her previous job.

Also there was too much emphasis on paperwork and appraisals and my mum felt that the very essence of nursing - the care - had been pushed aside.

So that's why she left - and if student nurses have a lovely idea in their heads of how they're going to bond with patients and make their experience as positive as possible they may be shocked at how stressful the role can be, and how little time they may have with their patients to provide the care they'd hoped to.

EDIT: Also there's the issue with pay and hours of course. She's in a 9-5 job now and enjoys having Christmases off, which she literally hadn't had for the whole of her adult life! She never complained about it, and always said it was a privilege to share Christmas with those unable to be at home with their families, but even so, she enjoys the time off now.
Why didn't she just go private or change wards or go into the community?
0
reply
Charlotte's Web
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#15
Report 1 month ago
#15
I left nursing last year after being qualified for 3 years for a variety of reasons, but essentially for me there was very limited scope for progression in my specialism and I was becoming bored and complacent. I was made redundant which solidified my decision that it was the time to leave nursing entirely. I needed more of a challenge but there was no open role for me to go to without relocating which I didn't want to do. I didn't really want to go back to shift work as it was having an impact on my mental health and general wellbeing which really limited my options.

The degree was really hard and I think by the time I qualified I was quite beaten down. It isn't for everyone and there's no shame in going in with good intentions and finding out it isn't for you. It (generally) is better to leave a profession/degree that is making you miserable than to sit it out and suffer.
3
reply
Good bloke
Badges: 19
Rep:
?
#16
Report 1 month ago
#16
(Original post by nursingstudentuk)
In what ways do you guys think people get the wrong expectations?
I suspect many fail to factor the words "excrement", "vomit", "blood", "suffering", "gore" and "brains" into their expectations and mistakenly think, because you now need a degree, that it is a genteel white collar occupation.
1
reply
nursingstudentuk
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#17
Report 1 month ago
#17
(Original post by Good bloke)
I suspect many fail to factor the words "excrement", "vomit", "blood", "suffering", "gore" and "brains" into their expectations and mistakenly think, because you now need a degree, that it is a genteel white collar occupation.
Haha, ok. Yeah I suppose that would be quite a shock if unexpected.
0
reply
Seretonin
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#18
Report 1 month ago
#18
(Original post by Charlotte's Web)
I left nursing last year after being qualified for 3 years for a variety of reasons, but essentially for me there was very limited scope for progression in my specialism and I was becoming bored and complacent. I was made redundant which solidified my decision that it was the time to leave nursing entirely. I needed more of a challenge but there was no open role for me to go to without relocating which I didn't want to do. I didn't really want to go back to shift work as it was having an impact on my mental health and general wellbeing which really limited my options.

The degree was really hard and I think by the time I qualified I was quite beaten down. It isn't for everyone and there's no shame in going in with good intentions and finding out it isn't for you. It (generally) is better to leave a profession/degree that is making you miserable than to sit it out and suffer.
What are you doing now if you don't mind me asking and did you consider private nursing?
0
reply
Charlotte's Web
Badges: 21
Rep:
?
#19
Report 1 month ago
#19
(Original post by Seretonin)
What are you doing now if you don't mind me asking and did you consider private nursing?
I work in clinical trials now, I'm involved in setting them up, monitoring them, training staff and visiting the sites. I still use a lot of my nursing skills but I'm no longer a registered nurse.

I don't know exactly what you mean by 'private nursing' as that encompasses a huge range of roles working outside of the NHS, but I was working for a private company before I left as a research nurse.
1
reply
Seretonin
Badges: 11
Rep:
?
#20
Report 1 month ago
#20
(Original post by Charlotte's Web)
I work in clinical trials now, I'm involved in setting them up, monitoring them, training staff and visiting the sites. I still use a lot of my nursing skills but I'm no longer a registered nurse.

I don't know exactly what you mean by 'private nursing' as that encompasses a huge range of roles working outside of the NHS, but I was working for a private company before I left as a research nurse.
Care homes, private hospitals?
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Back
to top
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

Current uni students - are you thinking of dropping out of university?

Yes, I'm seriously considering dropping out (44)
15.88%
I'm not sure (8)
2.89%
No, I'm going to stick it out for now (98)
35.38%
I have already dropped out (4)
1.44%
I'm not a current university student (123)
44.4%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed