Did I have a heart attack?

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nexttime
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#41
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#41
(Original post by Anonymous)
I didn't want a diagnosis, just an idea about things with similar symptoms. Particularly heart attacks, I just wanted to know if they can resolve themselves after 5 minutes or do they always lead to death without medical help.
(Original post by Cryoraptor)
No. If you had a heart attack and didn't get medical treatment, you'd be dead right now.
Most heart attacks do not kill.

They do leave permanent heart damage though.
(Original post by AzureCeleste)
No not necessarily.
A heart attack tends to arise due to some sort of blockage in the vessels which supply the heart. This could be due to a clot for example. Sometimes blood clots just end up resolving themselves and treatment doesn't need given to resolve it. However, part of your heart muscle does die during this so to prevent further attacks patients are put on medication (often blood thinners to prevent further clots from arising). For some people the clot may not resolve and as such they do require treatment or they will die- ultimately if you are having a heart attack you should always receive medical attention.
Heart attacks can present in different ways so some people may not realise they have had one
Hope this makes some sense.
Its not really a 'clot' resolving - its more that either the vessel isn't completely blocked or its sufficiently small that the downstream heart muscle dying is still compatible with life.

Most heart attacks are not simply clots.
(Original post by Anonymous)
To complicate things, I have haemophilia so I always thought that puts me at a lower risk of heart attacks as my blood doesn't clot as easily as other people's.
It does actually put you at a lower risk - something like 50% lower, depending on lots of things. Still quite possible though.
(Original post by AzureCeleste)
I'm pretty sure this far down the line an ECG is the only thing that could be done to determine if you had one (I could be completely wrong though but from my knowledge of the heart this is what I think).
ECG would be the first port of call and that is available in most GPs, but there are lots of scans a hospital could do to check if they wanted.
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AzureCeleste
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#42
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(Original post by nexttime)
Most heart attacks do not kill.

They do leave permanent heart damage though.

Its not really a 'clot' resolving - its more that either the vessel isn't completely blocked or its sufficiently small that the downstream heart muscle dying is still compatible with life.

Most heart attacks are not simply clots.

It does actually put you at a lower risk - something like 50% lower, depending on lots of things. Still quite possible though.

ECG would be the first port of call and that is available in most GPs, but there are lots of scans a hospital could do to check if they wanted.
Sorry I was aware it isn't necessarily a clot resolving and that it normally isn't, I was more trying to think of an example as to how it could go easily undetected and was first thing I thought of.
Didn't know GPs had ECGs- most of the ones I know of don't have them, nice to know
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#43
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(Original post by AzureCeleste)
Sorry I was aware it isn't necessarily a clot resolving and that it normally isn't, I was more trying to think of an example as to how it could go easily undetected and was first thing I thought of.
Didn't know GPs had ECGs- most of the ones I know of don't have them, nice to know
Sending a patient up to the hospital for a 2 minute ECG would seem a colossal exercise in wasting time and money... however, you're right some GPs do do just that. I don't think its the majority though. Seems quite area dependent. Maybe I'm wrong.
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AzureCeleste
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#44
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(Original post by nexttime)
Sending a patient up to the hospital for a 2 minute ECG would seem a colossal exercise in wasting time and money... however, you're right some GPs do do just that. I don't think its the majority though. Seems quite area dependent. Maybe I'm wrong.
I think perhaps my GP just doesn't have ECG's in the practice then
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Elektra06
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#45
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#45
Check the leaflet or look up online if caffeine interferes.

Those energy drinks are a lot of caffeine at once! I would discuss with a doctor but if it happens again check your heart rate, put a finger to your thumb or neck and count the beats in 1 minute see if it's abnormally high.

Only a professional can diagnose and or figure out if caffeine is safe for you to consume for the most part it is in moderation
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EyestriX
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#46
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#46
(Original post by Anonymous)
This happens to me. When im sitting or lying in an awkward position, i get sharp pains in my heart area and feel so out of breath. It hurts to inhale deeply during that time. Idk what it is but fingers crossed i dont die some time
i get that alot. I've gotten used to it. It's not your heart i believe (though best to get it checked by a doctor). I'm saying that because I get it on my left and right side at times, and sometimes lower down. It's my ribs that rub together or touch which causes the sharp pain. When you breath deeply, your ribcage move outwards, that's why the pain comes only when you breath deeply, or when you've been in an awkward position. When i massage my ribcage and do a few stretches, or practice breathing techniques it goes away
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EyestriX
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#47
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my mum gets that too btw so i guess it runs in the family
edit: she spoke to her doctor about it and he confirmed that it was her ribcage and not her heart. every case is different, i'm only saying what I experienced, i can't really say anything about yours
Last edited by EyestriX; 1 week ago
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Anonymous #3
#48
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Go to a private doctor asap or abroad.

NHS doctors are crap most of the time.

Better not to sit on it in case it actually was a heart attack.
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#49
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(Original post by Anonymous)
Go to a private doctor asap or abroad.

NHS doctors are crap most of the time.
Although almost all private doctors also work in the NHS, of course.
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#50
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(Original post by nexttime)
Although almost all private doctors also work in the NHS, of course.
Well yeah, but I meant to say that OP should go private instead of his local GP/hospital. They delay matters a lot and you end up in a long waiting list, or worse, your appointment cancelled/ postponed.
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