xx_Ammmz_xx
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Hi

Please could someone explain how specialised tissue is created from embryonic stem cells? Struggling to find an explanation that's making sense.

Thanks in advance!
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Kallisto
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(Original post by xx_Ammmz_xx)
Hi

Please could someone explain how specialised tissue is created from embryonic stem cells? Struggling to find an explanation that's making sense.

Thanks in advance!
An embryonic stem cell is at the beginning. After a while, it comes to a morula first and develops to a blastocyte, a phase in which embryonic stem cells are created. These cells are able to become every specialized tissue, as long as they are pluripotent. In the next steps of embryonic development, these pluripotent cells become to multipotent cells. These cells are just able to create certain tissues they are assigned.
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QuentinM
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(Original post by xx_Ammmz_xx)
Hi

Please could someone explain how specialised tissue is created from embryonic stem cells? Struggling to find an explanation that's making sense.

Thanks in advance!
Throughout development, exposure of cells to different hormones/signalling molecules, or to differing concentrations, starts the process of differentiation. Stem cells are "pluripotent", which means they can be turned into virtually any cell type in the body (main exceptions being cells that make up placenta, umbilical cord etc).

Release of different chemicals at different stages starts the process of turning those pluripotent cells into more specialised cells. For example, during a process known as "gastrulation", the ball of cells of an embryo forms three distinct layers. One of them, the ectoderm, is the cells that will eventually form the skin and nervous system.

Eventually as development nears its end (embryonic at least) the cells become closer to being "fully specialised".

Given the development of stem cell cultures in the last few decades, we have begun developing methods to differentiate stem cells into specific types in a dish (e.g. turning stem cells into neurons by exposing to specific chemicals at specific time frames)
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xx_Ammmz_xx
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(Original post by QuentinM)
Throughout development, exposure of cells to different hormones/signalling molecules, or to differing concentrations, starts the process of differentiation. Stem cells are "pluripotent", which means they can be turned into virtually any cell type in the body (main exceptions being cells that make up placenta, umbilical cord etc).

Release of different chemicals at different stages starts the process of turning those pluripotent cells into more specialised cells. For example, during a process known as "gastrulation", the ball of cells of an embryo forms three distinct layers. One of them, the ectoderm, is the cells that will eventually form the skin and nervous system.

Eventually as development nears its end (embryonic at least) the cells become closer to being "fully specialised".

Given the development of stem cell cultures in the last few decades, we have begun developing methods to differentiate stem cells into specific types in a dish (e.g. turning stem cells into neurons by exposing to specific chemicals at specific time frames)
Thank you!! This is a brilliant explanation
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