HA8210
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#1
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#1
explain the gas exchange system of insects, and how they are adapted for their lifestyle
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izaakha
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#2
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Explanation

1. Insects developed a tracheal system for gas exchange.
2. Trachea contains pores in its surface called spiracles. It is through these
spiracles that air moves.
3. Oxygen moves into the cell, down a concentration gradient (concentration of
oxygen outside the cell is higher than inside the cell).
4. To reach individual cells of the insect’s body, the trachea branch off into smaller
tracheoles.
5. Like oxygen, carbon dioxide also moves down a concentration gradient, from the
inside of the cell, to the spiracles. Eventually, carbon dioxide will be released into
the atmosphere.
6. Rhythmic abdominal movements facilitate the moving in and out of air in the
spiracles.

Not quite sure on the 'adaptations' - I think you could say that they are able to manually close their spiracles to prevent water loss, they also have a waxy cuticle that prevents water loss, they have Chitin Rings around the tracheae to keep the airway open, the tracheal tubes ends are full of tiny fluid lined tubes called tracheoles - respiratory gasses can dissolve into this fluid and easily diffuse
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HA8210
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#3
Report Thread starter 1 year ago
#3
(Original post by izaakha)
Explanation

1. Insects developed a tracheal system for gas exchange.
2. Trachea contains pores in its surface called spiracles. It is through these
spiracles that air moves.
3. Oxygen moves into the cell, down a concentration gradient (concentration of
oxygen outside the cell is higher than inside the cell).
4. To reach individual cells of the insect’s body, the trachea branch off into smaller
tracheoles.
5. Like oxygen, carbon dioxide also moves down a concentration gradient, from the
inside of the cell, to the spiracles. Eventually, carbon dioxide will be released into
the atmosphere.
6. Rhythmic abdominal movements facilitate the moving in and out of air in the
spiracles.

Not quite sure on the 'adaptations' - I think you could say that they are able to manually close their spiracles to prevent water loss, they also have a waxy cuticle that prevents water loss, they have Chitin Rings around the tracheae to keep the airway open, the tracheal tubes ends are full of tiny fluid lined tubes called tracheoles - respiratory gasses can dissolve into this fluid and easily diffuse
thanks again
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