Are people who do calisthenics just as physically strong as weight lifters?

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arthurpendragon1
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Question above

If there were two people, one trained through calisthenics and the other through lifting weights yet they were both a similar size, would the weight lifter cause more damage in a fight? Or do they both have the same capacity? Surely muscle is muscle
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gtty123
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Muscle size doesn't = fighting prowess.
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arthurpendragon1
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(Original post by gtty123)
Muscle size doesn't = fighting prowess.
Okay, so if somebody who was ripped through calisthenics attempted to curl a 20-25kg weight for the first time, would they really struggle despite being already very muscular through bodyweight exercises
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gtty123
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(Original post by arthurpendragon1)
Okay, so if somebody who was ripped through calisthenics attempted to curl a 20-25kg weight for the first time, would they really struggle despite being already very muscular through bodyweight exercises
It depends on the person. Personally, I've seen 'skinny' guys curl a lot. And, vice versa I've seen 'big' guys curl little amounts.
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Nutritionist
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Muscles that are the same size don’t have to have the same strength
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Cambrian80
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Nutritionist is right. Two muscles of the same size are not necessarily the same strength. A fun example would be Arnold, who in his prime was 107kg of muscle and could deadlift 322kg, which is the same as the current powerlifting WR holder in the 74kg weight class. Being bigger doesn't necessarily make someone stronger.
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Kyri
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Guys that are elite at calisthenics tend to have very high relative strength. In a lifting competition with weight classes they will do decent, although not as good as someone who has trained specifically with weight lifting. Muscles do become more efficient (aka stronger) at specific movement patterns if you practice them enough, regardless of muscle size. Equally, a weightlifter won't be as good at calisthenics as a someone who regularly trains calisthenics, even if they can lift more weight.

But small guys usually won't have the same absolute strength as a big guy that trains with heavy weights. Otherwise the records in weightlifting, powerlifting and strongman wouldn't always be held by the biggest guys. Yes, there's an element of some people having more fast twitch fibres than others, but usually bigger muscles have far more potential for strength if trained properly.
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Zain_Ahmed
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(Original post by arthurpendragon1)
Question above

If there were two people, one trained through calisthenics and the other through lifting weights yet they were both a similar size, would the weight lifter cause more damage in a fight? Or do they both have the same capacity? Surely muscle is muscle
Calisthenics would win. Calisthenics is about strength, whereas weight lifting makes u a little stronger, but not like calisthenics. Muscle is muscle but it isnt always strength.
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Nutritionist
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(Original post by Zain_Ahmed)
Calisthenics would win. Calisthenics is about strength, whereas weight lifting makes u a little stronger, but not like calisthenics. Muscle is muscle but it isnt always strength.
Weightlifters have a higher absolute strength than people who do callisthenics. That is, the can move more static weight from A to B than a callisthenics person
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Zain_Ahmed
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(Original post by Nutritionist)
Weightlifters have a higher absolute strength than people who do callisthenics. That is, the can move more static weight from A to B than a callisthenics person
Moving a static weight around doesn't mean that they have an increase in overall strength. Calisthenics is about buliding strength. You don't see your avg weightlifter doing planches or L - pullups. But calisthenics people can lift heavy.. Not as heavy as a weightlifter but as I said - lifting from A to B isnt always strength.
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Nutritionist
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(Original post by Zain_Ahmed)
Moving a static weight around doesn't mean that they have an increase in overall strength. Calisthenics is about buliding strength. You don't see your avg weightlifter doing planches or L - pullups. But calisthenics people can lift heavy.. Not as heavy as a weightlifter but as I said - lifting from A to B isnt always strength.
That’s why I said absolute strength
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Zain_Ahmed
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(Original post by Nutritionist)
That’s why I said absolute strength
Absolute strength is the overall strength.
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Nutritionist
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(Original post by Zain_Ahmed)
Absolute strength is the overall strength.
No
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Khanthebrit
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Bigger = Stronger.

Anyone saying otherwise is being silly. Do you really think the guys lifting in the 200lbs weight division are lifting more than those in the 308lbs division? Of course not. They've got an extra 108lbs of mass and size to add on.

It's likely those that people who do calisthenics are going to be much better at lifting their own bodyweight - that's specifically what they train for. a 308lbs powerlifter is likely to be pretty bad at this as he's going to have at least another 100lbs of weight to move.

It's also very likely that people who do powerlifting/strongman are physically stronger with regard to moving objects in their external environment - that's what they train for. IE Bench, Squats, Press, Deads etc. Someone who does calisthenics is likely to struggle as they haven't allowed themselves to gain an extra 100lbs of mass.
Last edited by Khanthebrit; 1 day ago
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Nutritionist
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(Original post by Khanthebrit)
Bigger = Stronger.

Anyone saying otherwise is being silly. Do you really think the guys lifting in the 200lbs weight division are lifting more than those in the 308lbs division? Of course not. They've got an extra 108lbs of mass and size to add on.
*Yuri Belkin has entered the chat*
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Khanthebrit
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(Original post by Nutritionist)
*Yuri Belkin has entered the chat*
There are a few extreme genetic monsters that defy my prior statement, but for the most part, bigger = stronger.
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Nutritionist
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(Original post by Khanthebrit)
There are a few extreme genetic monsters that defy my prior statement, but for the most part, bigger = stronger.
I know, I agree
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