Hda1011113
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Hi,
I’m just after some advice. I’m in year one of midwifery (January intake), completed one placement in feb/March and now currently on another. My first placement didn’t put me on night shifts but this new placement have done. I’ve got a few health conditions which don’t stop me from working but I’m very concerned with the upcoming night shifts due to me suffer hypothyroidism- I’m just concerned about the fatigue and being able to safely drive back home after my shift. My university offered for me to go to occupational health again but I declined as they aren’t really that helpful.
Is there something under the disability equality act to protect me if I decline to do night shifts if I act adversely to it? I’ve read something that covers employees with diabetes and other metabolic illnesses (thyroid would come under metabolic). Please can somebody advise me ?
I do well on the day shifts, apart from aching feet by the end I’m ok to drive back home. I’m just really nervous about nights 🙁
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Emily_B
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I'm a nurse and also have hypothyroidism. As long as you work out your sleeping pattern, and still keep taking your meds, you should be absolutely fine. The main issue - for absolutely everyone, not just those with hypothyroidism - is getting used to having spells of being up all night.
My trick for nights is to get up early the day I start nights, go to bed about 130-530pm (do best to rest if not sleep), and have a coffee just before I go out to work. I also still take my meds in the morning - just on the morning I start nights, then in the morning when I get home from work.
It's perfectly fine to feel nervous about doing nights. Feeling tired, and sometimes a bit odd, after nights is completely normal for everyone.
If nights start seriously affecting your health, you'll need to get a plan put in place, agreed by the uni and by the placements. Don't be surprised if this requires speaking to Occupational Health too!
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Tracey_W
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(Original post by Hda1011113)
Hi,
I’m just after some advice. I’m in year one of midwifery (January intake), completed one placement in feb/March and now currently on another. My first placement didn’t put me on night shifts but this new placement have done. I’ve got a few health conditions which don’t stop me from working but I’m very concerned with the upcoming night shifts due to me suffer hypothyroidism- I’m just concerned about the fatigue and being able to safely drive back home after my shift. My university offered for me to go to occupational health again but I declined as they aren’t really that helpful.
Is there something under the disability equality act to protect me if I decline to do night shifts if I act adversely to it? I’ve read something that covers employees with diabetes and other metabolic illnesses (thyroid would come under metabolic). Please can somebody advise me ?
I do well on the day shifts, apart from aching feet by the end I’m ok to drive back home. I’m just really nervous about nights 🙁
(Original post by Emily_B)
I'm a nurse and also have hypothyroidism. As long as you work out your sleeping pattern, and still keep taking your meds, you should be absolutely fine. The main issue - for absolutely everyone, not just those with hypothyroidism - is getting used to having spells of being up all night.
My trick for nights is to get up early the day I start nights, go to bed about 130-530pm (do best to rest if not sleep), and have a coffee just before I go out to work. I also still take my meds in the morning - just on the morning I start nights, then in the morning when I get home from work.
It's perfectly fine to feel nervous about doing nights. Feeling tired, and sometimes a bit odd, after nights is completely normal for everyone.
If nights start seriously affecting your health, you'll need to get a plan put in place, agreed by the uni and by the placements. Don't be surprised if this requires speaking to Occupational Health too!
Emily_B
Hda1011113

Yeah that's what I do on nightshifts Emily. Get up in the morning earky and do what I need to do and then back to bed around 12pm untill about 5.30 and up and off to work. I don't suffer from that but generally getting your body use to working nights when you used to sleeping is the thing you got to do.it do take time to adjust.

The only thing is nightshifts is basically compulsory on midwifing as a student as its part of the whole 24/7 of things as babies can't wait till next day.

You need to obviously put plan in place for to cope with this with making your mentor / ward manager & sister aware you have this and hopefully they can help you with things,
You may be best talking to your course leader and seek more information whether you can work only dayshifts but under NMC regs I think you need to still complete a certain amount of nightshifts hours .
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mayacerise
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I know this may not help but I did a nursing degree for a while (dropped out) and I’m still a nursing assistant and prefer working nights. My pattern for nights which works for me but may not work for others is say I start nights on a Friday, Thursday night I’ll stay up until about 6:30 in the Friday morning then I’ll sleep from then until about 16:30/17:30 (I can sleep for ages and not be woken up) then I’ll get up and get ready for my night shifts
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moonkatt
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You can have medical exemption to doing nightshifts as a student, but you'll have to prove that through going to occy health, this would apply with any condition, they're there for that reason, not involving them won't go in your favour.
Last edited by moonkatt; 1 month ago
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paub
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wife has lupus she was exempted long before it was diagnosed. it would cripple her and effected her practice. her ward would not permit no nights. so she was transferred to community. night work is recognized as harmful to health if you have real reasons why you cant do it. but they can try to also sack you. so be careful
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moonkatt
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(Original post by paub)
wife has lupus she was exempted long before it was diagnosed. it would cripple her and effected her practice. her ward would not permit no nights. so she was transferred to community. night work is recognized as harmful to health if you have real reasons why you cant do it. but they can try to also sack you. so be careful
This is why it's important to be in a union
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paub
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very important. occy health did more though.
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Hda1011113
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Hi,
I’m completed back to back night shifts and did well. First night was worse but peanut butter kept me going. I did find driving difficult after the last night though so I think I’d need to see occupational health about placement distances as I know uni would want me to go to a big one in a city centre which is an hour drive with traffic. Thanks for the advice. I’m treading really carefully with Occy health as I know what they can be like
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